#1
Hey there,

My brother keeps getting more and more annoyed with me playing guitar at low volumes so I will need to sell my amp I think. There is not really any other option.

Since I already was planning to get an audio interface and guitarrig. Will I be able to use any audio interface as an fx loop? I would like to be able to keep my effects pedals more than my amp. But without my amp I can't really use them to their full extent.

I thought of buying an M-audio M-track, but I think I'll need to pay much more if it has to have an fx loop or something that I can use as an fx loop.

Any recommendations/ideas?
#2
Honestly, routing all of that through a DAW will get annoying. You'll need an interface with at least two ins and four outs.

The best solution, for the same amount of money, is to get an isolated speaker cab and use your current amp into that, then run the mic inside the iso cab into your daw for headphone/low level monitoring. Or just get an amp with a headphone output.
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#3
Buy an amp with a headphone input :-/ It's pretty standard on most combo amps out there nowadays.

Doesn't have to be fancy, and if you feel like you need to get rid of your amp (which I wouldn't unless you don't like how it sounds), then the money you get from selling it can be put toward an amp with a headphone port.

I honestly don't think you need the FX loop at all if your running into a DAW. Here's why: The reason FX loops were made was because time based effects (i.e. Delay) sound terrible when you put them before an amp's onboard distortion/OD/Crunch and sound just as bad when they're going through a clean pre-amp that you cranked to get tube saturation. An FX loop alleviates it by allowing you to place your pedals after the gain stage.

Another side effect of an FX loop is that your modulation pedals get fed a stronger signal (since your signal goes through the gain stage before it hits those effects).

Without any of that being a factor in your case, you don't really need one. In fact, you may find that your rig sounds cleaner/clearer without the FX loop when you're playing on the clean channel without tube saturation, but that's another two paragraphs.

Try running everything in the same order (main line effects and then whatever is in your effects loop) directly into the DAW and then use one of the amp sims from Guitar Rig. I think it'll be fine If your modulation sounds weak, try adding a booster in between the main line and effects loop pedals.

You shouldn't be running into tube saturation or Dist/Crunch/Fuzz/OD problems because you shouldn't be using them. Pick something clean in Guitar Rig to simulate.

Sorry if you know most of what I said, but I figured I'd cover the whole shebang

EDIT: In fact, don't even use an amp sim in Guitar Rig. Go with a cab sim. I'm assuming you have an OD of some sort on your board. Another way to look at them is an 'amp in a box' of sorts, so you really shouldn't need an amp sim
Last edited by mjones1992 at May 28, 2014,
#4
Well the only OD I have is this bad monkey which I only use to switch from rhythm tone to lead tone so to speak. Or to make my metal rhythm sound in combination with my amp gain. So it's not enough gain for my style of music.

So I can just run guitar rig with my fx like:
Guitar ---> Noise supressor --> Delay --> EQ ---> M-track ---> Guitar rig?

The noise supressor has a seperate send an return for cancelling the effects of the noise. My wah and OD are hooked to that one.

Will this setup sound any good? I think I can ditch the EQ. Because my Bugera V22 was way to warm and I needed a more modern tone. Only possible with an EQ pedal.

I just don't like to not be able to control effects with my foot. It's a weird thing I have.
#5
What about getting a multi effect pedal that's also an interface? The Zoom G3/G5 would do a great job for you - an interface for playing into your DAW, you can plug headphones straight into it, and you could use it with your amp when you get the opportunity to play out loud.
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#6
Quote by GaryBillington
What about getting a multi effect pedal that's also an interface? The Zoom G3/G5 would do a great job for you - an interface for playing into your DAW, you can plug headphones straight into it, and you could use it with your amp when you get the opportunity to play out loud.


So I can just plug it in via USB to my computer and be able to use it with guitar rig as amp simulator?
EDIT: Can I also use it as just an interface. So leaving all the amp sims out and effects? So I can use my direct guitar signal to my computer into guitar rig?
Last edited by liampje at May 28, 2014,
#7
Quote by liampje
So I can just plug it in via USB to my computer and be able to use it with guitar rig as amp simulator?
EDIT: Can I also use it as just an interface. So leaving all the amp sims out and effects? So I can use my direct guitar signal to my computer into guitar rig?

Yeah, they're not the most amazing interfaces in the world (after all, it's a secondary function) but they're decent enough. I used a DigiTech BP355 for years before I got my Scarlett.
#8
Sorry to kind of go off topic. But will those multi effects sound well if you put it in front of an amp. And then I'm talking about the delay effects, because they tend to sound not as good when not in the effects loop.

Ontopic: Will a G3 unit give at least the decency of an m-track? And is it compatible with windows 8?
#9
I find the delay effects are pretty good, there are some good modulation effects on it as well....but I use it in the loop so not a fair comparison for what you're after. FWIW, it does sound really good using the inbuilt ODs & amp sims through headphones - I'd personally rate it higher than the Line 6 POD or M series, but that's about as useful as saying I prefer Gibson to Fender.

I've never used the interface feature so can't comment on it's quality, but according to the specs it does work with Windows 8.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at May 29, 2014,
#10
The line in will be more or less comparable, but obviously it won't work for microphones. Maybe, maybe not. Who knows until you try. If you already have an OD (and don't wanna use the OD in the multieffect) then you could always make a clean patch and use it in conjunction with your OD. Place the OD before the amp and the multi in the FX loop on a clean patch (no amp sims or anything like that, just the effects you want). The upshot of this is you can also have another patch for just using the multi on its own, and several others for different things.
#11
I'm gonna add another point here.

I've been playing clean through an interface and adding all the efects with simulations for practice and recording for the last 4 years. In fact i don't have an amp anymore (sold it to buy more studio stuff lol). I basically use Amplitube 3, Guitar Rig, some free sims with cab impulses that are awesome & effects from DAW, etc. My outputs are Phones in night, Monitors in day

I do have a Line 6 M13 for live shows, and i'm lucky enough to have a friend who is always willing to lend me his amp if there's no other band playing who's willing to share the amp for a while (I don't usually gig lately anyways).
I almost never record the M13 trough the interface, it's get muddy easy, and it's a lot harder to control the effects.

So my point is: Buy an interface, connect your guitar clean, sim all the effects, etc. and see if that is enough for you. It has been for me for years (Notice that there's a lot to learn to tweak the programs, effects and equing to make your guitar sounds good alone and specially in a mix).

You can keep your pedals and send them straight to the interface and see if it's enough. Hell, you can split your signal with a splitter, one with your guitar clean connected to a sim, and another with your effects also to a sim and mix the volume kinda in the way you do with an effect loop (never tried that, i just tought of it! going to try it)

If that suits you, it's time to sell your amp, buy better interfaces, monitors, and get in the crazy and expensive world of recording in your home.

But first buy an interface and start testing

Just an idea...
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Last edited by tiky at May 30, 2014,