#1
I'm catching up on theory I've neglected and am leaning chord construction. So a D Major is made with a D, A and F sharp. When turning this into say a Dsus2 you add an E by removing the F sharp. I'm just wondering why the F sharp gets chucked out here as opposed to the A?

Thanks for any help.
#2
If you're wanting to learn your theory right you should always try and list the note intervals in their respective orders. For a D chord it would be D F# A. When making a sus2 you remove the third (F#) and replace it with a second (E) therefore making the chord D, E, A. Don't do like you're doing and list the 1st, 5th then 3rd. It will just create a lot of confusion as it seems to have already done.

Music theory has rules and if you removed the A that would be far far from a Dsus2. The A is the 5th not the 3rd. You may be confused due to not properly ordering your note intervals?
The first is always the root note and you work from there. I have a hunch that you don't have the fundamental major scale knowledge to understand how chords are made?
If I'm wrong then crucify me but i will give you a very quick summary of how a D major is made:

A major scale is made using the intervals T T S T T T S (tones and semitones).
The D major scale consists of D E F# G A B C#
The D major chord contains the bold notes... D E F# G A B C#
They are the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes as you see in the scale.
A Dsus2 would remove the 3rd and replace it with the 2nd, and the intervals in this case would look like so....
D E F# G A B C#

If you already know this then excuse me if i come off as condescending or rude, but from your original post it seems like you lack the understanding
Last edited by vayne92 at May 28, 2014,
#3
Yeah I do know basically how chords are made with the major scale and that d is the root, F sharp 3rd a 5th etc. I guess the guy I learned it from just didn't tell me why you remove the 3rd as opposed to the 5th.

And just out of interest (and if this is a stupid question tell me why) in every sus2 chord presumably the 3rd is always removed to play the 2nd?

Thanks for clearing any of this up.
#4
Quote by ltimatetablatur
I guess the guy I learned it from just didn't tell me why you remove the 3rd as opposed to the 5th.


I can't answer this myself. I'm not exceptionally bright on my music knowledge. It's just the rules i guess . Maybe there's an actual reason for it, but not one i can answer. Doesn't matter regardless. Those are just the rules haha.

Quote by ltimatetablatur
And just out of interest (and if this is a stupid question tell me why) in every sus2 chord presumably the 3rd is always removed to play the 2nd?


The formula for a standard Sus2 is ALWAYS the same. 1st, 2nd, 5th. Remove the third and replace with the 2nd. It's just the rules
#6
In order for a chord to be suspended (sus), you must replace the 3rd. If you were to say replace the 5th and make D F# E, you would get a Dmajoradd9 (Dmajoradd2nd if your placing the second before the third D E F#), which while is similar, isn't suspended, and would be very much major.
#7
Quote by Jimjambanx
In order for a chord to be suspended (sus), you must replace the 3rd. If you were to say replace the 5th and make D F# E, you would get a Dmajoradd9 (Dmajoradd2nd if your placing the second before the third D E F#), which while is similar, isn't suspended, and would be very much major.


Ah yes this would make sense. Been a while since i brushed up on my chord knowledge.
#8
The 5th (whether perfect, diminished, or augmented) is basically always there in a chord. Even if it's not played, it's implied (or specifically labeled with a 'no5'). The root and the 5th are basically the first building blocks in any chord with everything else decorating around them. Someone who knows better can feel free to correct me, but that's how I've always understood it, so much so that when I see a chord I need to name the first thing I do is look for a 5th so that I know the lower note of that interval is the root and the chord is built from there.

In this instance, replacing the 5th with the 2nd instead of the 3rd still really leaves you with a 5th (like I said, it's implied) ultimately giving you a formula of the root, 2nd (or 9th), third, fifth. This is an add9 chord. The difference between a sus2 and an add9 is whether or not the third is left.
#9
Quote by vayne92

The formula for a standard Sus2 is ALWAYS the same. 1st, 2nd, 5th. Remove the third and replace with the 2nd. It's just the rules


Yeah a sus chord removes the 3rd so it sounds kind of ambigous, neither major nor minor, since the third is the main component of telling you whether a chord is major or minor.

Quote by ltimatetablatur

And just out of interest (and if this is a stupid question tell me why) in every sus2 chord presumably the 3rd is always removed to play the 2nd?


yeah if it's a sus2 it won't have a third.

you can play the third as well as the 2, though- in that case it'd be either a major or minor 9 chord (or an add 9 if you omit the major or minor 7th).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
The chords themselves (sus2 and sus4) actually come from old ensemble arrangements (any group of instruments, not just small ones).

It's all got to do with really old composition techniques and voice leading: if you want to transition smoothly from one chord to another then a good way to do that is to 'suspend' one note from one of the chords and change the notes around it. As a very basic example on a guitar something like this:


e|---------
b|---------
g|-7--7--4-
d|-9--7--5-
a|-10-10-7-
e|---------


(G, Gsus2, Em)

You hit the G chord, suspend the third to the second which gives you a nice leading melodic line down to the Em.

Really that's a terrible example (and might not actually be technically correct) because I don't fully understand it... but that's the basic idea of where they come from.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#12
Quote by The_guitarguy
This site seems to have a decent download for basic chord construction..

<url redacted>


I hope you get banned soon.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.