#1
Looking for any advice from some of you country slingers. I recently joined a country band there giving me a lot of time and are willing to be patient while I learn but I need to hold my end of the deal and progress as fast as I can. They don't expect me to sound just like the songs we do our own thing and I can put my own style on it, only problem is that I don't have a lot of experience in the genre as a lead player. My dad tought me how to strum along D, G and A a long time ago but other than that I'm pretty green.

Now I don't expect it to happen over night but a little guideline in the technique/theory department would be greatly appreciated. Here's where I'm at.

I know major/minor pentatonic scales in all 5 positions
I can improvise in key and in time
Have a few licks I can work in from youtube but it kinda sounds forced at times
I know a good part of the fretboard top 3 strings better but can find any note
Have a basic understanding in chord structure

Pretty much I can play along with the guys, follow the melody a bit but my playing just doesn't sound "country" most of the time it sounds like I'm trying to play metal which is kinda true cuz I always go to my main licks. If I stay away from old habits my playing is in key and time but it sounds very monotone and boring.

How can I sound more country? Sorry for the vague question I just don't know how to start twangin. Songs I'm expected to play are old to new guys like Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings and Alan Jackson and newer songs like Wagon wheel and Mud on the Tires.

If anyone has any advice that would be awesome or even if you could direct me to a youtube channel, instructional book/software or some website that could help. For now I'm just cruising Youtube lessons.

Thanks. Oh and btw I'm using a squire Telecaster and a VoxVT20+ looking to upgrade to a Peavey Classic 30 soon.
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
Last edited by UFC on VHS at May 28, 2014,
#2
Listen listen listen. The classic country sound is rooted in blues and bluegrass music, often with a pedal steel guitar to achieve the signature twang.

Common techniques for twang are double stops with bends, slides, hammer/pull, fingerstyle or hybrid plucking ("chicken pickin"), strong use of blue notes.... And make sure to follow the chords - use the corresponding pentatonic scale for each chord change, and arpeggios on the dominants.

I've got like a 2 minute sample of country-style lead playing if you click the soundcloud link in my signature vvvvv Nothing virtuosic, but it's decent wrap up of standard country sounds.
#3
Chicken pickin. Gotta have some of that in your quiver. Lots of good tutorials on youtube and truefire.com to get you in the feel and moves of country. I am no country Tele hero but we have covered a dozen country tunes over the years and James Burton, Buck Owens, Vince Gill, and Brad Paisley are really good players to listen to and cop their moves.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Well, first thing you need to do is to LISTEN to country songs all day long. You can't expect to sound country unless you've heard a ton of it.
#6
The best way is really to learn country tunes (preferably by ear), that way you learn what country players do in context. Like what they use over specific chords, how they comp, how they blend major and minor with chromaticism.

Listen to the great country players, guys like Brad Paisley, Danny Gatton, Johnny Hiland, Chet Atkins, Brent Mason, Jerry Reed, Joe Maphis etc. Learn what they are doing from the recordings. And on youtube you can surely find videos explaining the different techniques used in country.

A good ear is your friend. Just like when you were learning to speak, you had to imitate professionals (your parents and relatives). If you are going to learn the language of country, you have to imitate the professionals until you can talk on your own.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
Quote by UFC on VHS
Looking for any advice from some of you country slingers. I recently joined a country band there giving me a lot of time and are willing to be patient while I learn but I need to hold my end of the deal and progress as fast as I can. They don't expect me to sound just like the songs we do our own thing and I can put my own style on it, only problem is that I don't have a lot of experience in the genre as a lead player. My dad tought me how to strum along D, G and A a long time ago but other than that I'm pretty green.

Now I don't expect it to happen over night but a little guideline in the technique/theory department would be greatly appreciated. Here's where I'm at.

I know major/minor pentatonic scales in all 5 positions
I can improvise in key and in time
Have a few licks I can work in from youtube but it kinda sounds forced at times
I know a good part of the fretboard top 3 strings better but can find any note
Have a basic understanding in chord structure

Pretty much I can play along with the guys, follow the melody a bit but my playing just doesn't sound "country" most of the time it sounds like I'm trying to play metal which is kinda true cuz I always go to my main licks. If I stay away from old habits my playing is in key and time but it sounds very monotone and boring.

How can I sound more country? Sorry for the vague question I just don't know how to start twangin. Songs I'm expected to play are old to new guys like Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings and Alan Jackson and newer songs like Wagon wheel and Mud on the Tires.

If anyone has any advice that would be awesome or even if you could direct me to a youtube channel, instructional book/software or some website that could help. For now I'm just cruising Youtube lessons.

Thanks. Oh and btw I'm using a squire Telecaster and a VoxVT20+ looking to upgrade to a Peavey Classic 30 soon.


The easiest way = learn the guitar solos for the songs you need to learn. Country, for the most part, is pretty straightforward on guitar once you learn some solos you'll see a lot of repetition of licks and lines which sound "classically country". When in doubt, learn Hotwired from Brent Mason and just copy what he's doing, which is what I hear half the time I see a country act.
#8
G Major Pentatonic is your friend.Also look for Gegg Koch on YT.He does clinics and shows you one style of chickin pickin that sounds cool,Once you get it down you could work it in there.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at May 29, 2014,
#9
Ok thanks guys I have a lot of work to do
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112