#1
Hello guys,

So i've found that A phrygian mode and F major scale has the same notes in them but with different tonics and subdominants vice versa...

My question is;

that i shouldn't mistake them and
-play F major scale over Fmajor
-play A phrygian mode over Amajor

Is it right and if you have more ideas on how to make my soloing sound good over different chords with these scales please write them down
#2
Yes those are technically what it is, but considering your observation i see that you really arent proficient in this. Please refer to the stick in the sub forum. Also I'll just put in a little tip for you here. All the modes in general are related to each other and in particularly to the major and minor scales. Do some research on this first before you get into the 'D dorian is to a, F lydian' stuff.
#4
Quote by rockzede
Hello guys,

So i've found that A phrygian mode and F major scale has the same notes in them but with different tonics and subdominants vice versa...

My question is;

that i shouldn't mistake them and
-play F major scale over Fmajor
-play A phrygian mode over Amajor

Is it right and if you have more ideas on how to make my soloing sound good over different chords with these scales please write them down


You can play however you like, and you are correct that these are scales. A phrygian would sound best over Am, not major.

If you play these scales, over both these chords in the same progression progression, then what you have, is functioning as F major.

If you're playing over an A minor only and not changing chords, then you are playing A Phrygian, if you play either scale.

I think as a starting point, if you take the odd note, the note that makes the scale characteristic - (in the case, of Phrygian, it's the 2nd note you play. the b2( and treat this as a passing note or color note you can use that to make your solo over that, sound interesting if you know that note bends the ear a bit, and you can color your lines with it at will.

If you change from Am though, then you can lose that Phrygian flavor unless you know what you are doing.

Kudos for your question and it sounds like you're really trying to understand. Respect for that.

Best,

Sean
#5
thanks for all you guys I'm gonna eat that sticky now!

Quote by Sean0913
You can play however you like, and you are correct that these are scales. A phrygian would sound best over Am, not major.

If you play these scales, over both these chords in the same progression progression, then what you have, is functioning as F major.

If you're playing over an A minor only and not changing chords, then you are playing A Phrygian, if you play either scale.

I think as a starting point, if you take the odd note, the note that makes the scale characteristic - (in the case, of Phrygian, it's the 2nd note you play. the b2( and treat this as a passing note or color note you can use that to make your solo over that, sound interesting if you know that note bends the ear a bit, and you can color your lines with it at will.

If you change from Am though, then you can lose that Phrygian flavor unless you know what you are doing.

Kudos for your question and it sounds like you're really trying to understand. Respect for that.

Best,

Sean


and this was a good explanation further thanks for your effort I have to study a bit to understand these i'm all lost now I am still trying to find a way out.