#1
So for a few months now, I've been encountering a problem with the pickup selector switch on my PRS SE Custom 24: When I switch to the bridge position, the output is greatly decreased, and if I lower the tone knob to its minimum, there will be barely any sound at all. I am told this is a issue with the parts not making full contact (which is confirmed when I press the switch hard towards the bridge, as the output begins to increase, but when I release pressure, the problem comes back).

However, occasionally, without doing anything, this problem will fix itself. The bridge pickup will be back to full output without me ever touching any internals. Then on the next day, without touching any internals, the problem will come back. Does anyone know the cause of this and/or a permanent solution to fix this problem? It would be ideal if i didn't spend extra money to replace the entire switch. Thanks!
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#2
Sounds like something needs to be re-soldered. Take a look inside to see if anything is obviously loose. If you're confident with a soldering iron it shouldn't be too hard and it'll cost you nothing! If you don't want to do that, take it to a guitar tech. A small job like that shouldn't be too expensive
#3
Quote by JustGuitar98
Sounds like something needs to be re-soldered. Take a look inside to see if anything is obviously loose. If you're confident with a soldering iron it shouldn't be too hard and it'll cost you nothing! If you don't want to do that, take it to a guitar tech. A small job like that shouldn't be too expensive


Curious as to why this would be solder-related? As i mentioned, if i push hard on the switch towards the bridge position, there is temporarily more output (until I release the pressure). But I will take a look into the soldering anyway.
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#4
I had the same problem with one of my squier after replacing the pickups, I think that a piece of wire fell into it, had to replace the switch, those asian closed switches are not really meant to be disassembled. Maybe some contact cleaner spray would help? Of course if your switch is open it's easier to troubleshoot the problem

that guitar is like falling in love with a stripper
Silmeria
Valkyrie
modded Squier Strats
#5
Quote by billyTheShears
I had the same problem with one of my squier after replacing the pickups, I think that a piece of wire fell into it, had to replace the switch, those asian closed switches are not really meant to be disassembled. Maybe some contact cleaner spray would help? Of course if your switch is open it's easier to troubleshoot the problem


The switch is a closed type. Still, I'm very curious as to why this problem arises, then fixes itself overtime, without my intervention in any way.
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#6
It could be a solder connection, or it might be an accumulation of dirt or some kind of gun on the contacts of the switch. When you push on it, the switch makes full contact because something is moving. Either there's more pressure being put on the contacts on the switch, making a cleaner connection, or the solder joint is being closed by the pressure. It could just be the switch itself, too.

Clean the contacts in the switch and see what happens. If that doesn't do it, check the solder joints. If that doesn't do it, try putting a jumper from the pickup to wherever the wire on the other side of the switch is going. That will tell you if the switch is bad.
#7
Quote by Monkeyleg
It could be a solder connection, or it might be an accumulation of dirt or some kind of gun on the contacts of the switch. When you push on it, the switch makes full contact because something is moving. Either there's more pressure being put on the contacts on the switch, making a cleaner connection, or the solder joint is being closed by the pressure. It could just be the switch itself, too.

Clean the contacts in the switch and see what happens. If that doesn't do it, check the solder joints. If that doesn't do it, try putting a jumper from the pickup to wherever the wire on the other side of the switch is going. That will tell you if the switch is bad.



Tried cleaning it, the problem is still here. I don't think I have a jumper or electrical equipment to check the connections.

Say if I were to replace the switch. Would a switch like this work? The current one is a 3-way blade switch.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Electronics,_pickups/Components:_Switches_and_knobs/CRL_3-way_Lever_Switch.html
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#9
I don't know what the original switch looks like.

The jumper is just a piece of wire. It helps to have small alligator clips on each end. Attach it to the switch at the two points that are being switched. For example, if the switch connects the pickup to a tone knob, then connect one clip to the switch terminal for the pickup and the other to the switch terminal for the tone knob.

The idea is to bypass the switch and see if the problem persists. That's assuming that cleaning the switch and playing with the solder joint don't do anything. Check the solder joints by poking at them with a pencil while the guitar is plugged in and you're hitting strings to make noise.
#10
Quote by Monkeyleg
I don't know what the original switch looks like.

The jumper is just a piece of wire. It helps to have small alligator clips on each end. Attach it to the switch at the two points that are being switched. For example, if the switch connects the pickup to a tone knob, then connect one clip to the switch terminal for the pickup and the other to the switch terminal for the tone knob.

The idea is to bypass the switch and see if the problem persists. That's assuming that cleaning the switch and playing with the solder joint don't do anything. Check the solder joints by poking at them with a pencil while the guitar is plugged in and you're hitting strings to make noise.



In terms of appearance, they look exactly the same. It's just that I'm not sure of the dimensions of the one on the website. I emailed them and am currently awaiting a response.
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...