#1
Here's some tips I came up with through a mixture of learning a couple songs and researching a lot. Think of this as a beginner Doom Metal guitar guide. I also included a few Black Metal tips but those are extremely minor things (I don't expect to write a separate guide for that).

Here are the basics to Doom Metal (a slow bitter-sweet version of Heavy Metal initially inspired by Black Sabbath). It's also a type of Extreme Metal and has sub-genres of its own like Stoner Rock, Sludge Metal, Drone Metal, Gothic Metal, Death-Doom, and possibly Goth Rock.
1. Listen to some good Doom Metal bands such as Candlemass, Saint Vitus, Warning (the doom metal band), Paradise Lost (pioneers of Gothic Metal and especially the Doom oriented variant), or Black Sabbath. Next learn one of their songs and analyze it or research multiple Doom songs on Songsterr (that's what I did for quite a bit of my information).
2. Melodies in both Doom Metal and Black Metal tend to be strong and dark (high quality melodies that sound good slower and faster). Doom Metal uses more 8th notes than you'd think (at least at slower tempos) and doesn't have to have a tempo below 100 BPM. It also mixes the 8th notes with slower notes (4th and half notes) and usually has strong and melancholy melodies.  Doom Metal utilizes minor keys, and fairly slow tempos. Thirds and fourths (especially the Perfect 4th) are important in this style and power chords are used almost as often as in other styles of Metal. The pentatonic minor and Blues minor scale are quite popular in this style as is Aeolian and occasionally Harmonic Minor. Some also argue that the Phrygian and Phrygian Dominant (Phrygian with a Major 3rd instead of a minor 3rd) are useful for both a dark and/or exotic sound.
3. Doom Metal drum beats are often very similar to Hard Rock ones (complete with backbeat snare and usually the kick on 1 and 3) but slowed down a little.  Both Doom Metal and occasionally Black Metal often have the snare doing a basic backbeat (played on 2nd and 4th beat in quarter note). They tend to be fairly simple but effective.
4. Both Black Metal and Doom Metal usually have simple basslines that mirror the guitar parts and closely listens to the drums (although the same can be said for Emo, Hard Rock, and certain types of Punk and Metal). Doom Metal (in general) is often pretty repetitive but that's not a bad thing.
5. Also the best way to play in sync with a band and produce a good groove is to listen to the drummer.
6. Fuzz is considered a very important part of the Doom Metal guitar tone and to a lesser extent, bass tone. Big Muffs are a very popular and affordable fuzz pedal (I'd recommend either the original type or the Bass Big Muff). I also find that the Boss CE-5 pedal (which to me is a very dark and cool sounding chorus pedal) is good for Extreme Metal (especially Doom Metal and Black Metal). You might want to use a little overdrive from your amp and boost the mids and bass (treble should be around a 6).

Good luck writing doom metal and hope this helps. These are merely guidelines and not rules.

Update: I updated this with new facts and observations on 6/6/17. I wanted it to be more accurate than it was (I kinda retooled it a bit).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Jun 6, 2017,
#3
Perfect fourths are the most important, and (well) hidden thirds - be creative with inversions.

See Warning.
#4
I chose Black Sabbath because they're the most famous example and people would recognize them more than say Saint Vitus or Candlemass. This is supposed to be a beginner's guide and I only put what I knew. I agree though that I should've put more emphasis on the Perfect Fourth and inversions.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#5
That's fair. But I would put a few more names up. 1-3 more. Examples: Witchfinder General, Warning, Solstice, Pentagram.
#6
How to write Doom Metal:

1. Listen to it
2. Listen to it some more
3. Keep listening
4. Listen to something else if you start to feel burnt out
5. Listen to it some more later
6. Start writing

(You can apply this tactic to any genre. If you find yourself unable to write in the style after prolonged listening, then go back and listen some more.)
Last edited by TheHydra at May 30, 2014,
#7
Slow tempo, bluesy riffs, fuzz, heavy drum beat.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
[quote="RonaldPoe
5. Finally I'd suggest writing a normal Metal song before starting to write Doom Metal (helps a lot).
QUOTE"]


1. Listen to some good Doom Metal bands such as Candlemass,

I was on the bus today procrastinating while returning home from watching the new tom cruise sci-fi. - I haven't made much music in years because I was waiting in college to learn more about song writing and theory. I'm new to targeting notes and niche chord functions for Jazz, blues and country etc. But, I've been doing Metallica,slayer,maiden and heavier bands like Death-schuldiner for years. Sometimes I find it hard to see any relation in riff based songs. I can see chords and harmonies, but have been lost on relating a 4/5 (or whatever) bar loop to the next riff loop. - I've wanted an explanation and hard method for of a riff after you have a solid intro, verse. - Then I realised just like the demos I did years ago, you need to pre design the structure and go with the feel/tempo of riffs. Candlemass have great arrangements. 9/10 every riff is pretty much in the same key. Some times they will cycle a b3 or just use 2 4 5 1. Most riffs work chromatically with diatonic and triadic harmony?

If there are any tried and tested metal looping devices I can't find any..
Last edited by 094568029434geo at Jun 2, 2014,
#9
I recently started a Doom Metal Band but after creating 4 songs that I find fairly original, I have trouble not to accidentally steal big Doom bands ideas like Cirith Ungol (By Reverend Bizarre) bass bridge or Dark Buddha Rising's Chinytid45 main riff. They are not exactly the same but the ressemblance is uncanny. Am I not listening to enough Doom? Is this just a way to cope with creativity blocks and I'll start composing original stuff afterwards? Is my musical instinct in need of making covers? XD I don't know man, I just wanna start composing good original stuff like I used to
#10
lol didn't Ronald just make a thread a week ago asking for info on doom? He literally hasn't learned anything in three years.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
Quote by theogonia777
lol didn't Ronald just make a thread a week ago asking for info on doom? He literally hasn't learned anything in three years.


Yeah that's about it. I guess I will make my own thread. This guy can't help me.