#1
So, the latest chapter in the fret buzz issue. I took my guitar to a tech who says the guitar isn't set up right. It's in its factory setup, so it's however Ibanez left it although who knows what shipping did it to it. Also, the neck is very very straight (his words), which it is, I remember seeing that when I inspected. He said raising the action would sort the fret buzz (as I thought) and that he's personally leave it alone. It's £25 and 1 hour to get it set up. Should I do it?

All my guitars to date have been just factory set up
#2
My personal feeling is that everyone should learn how to set up their own guitars. It's fairly easy to learn, the tools are very inexpensive, and it'll be very fruitful for you in the long run as a guitarist. Check out some guides, and buy some hex keys.
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#3
Quote by JustRooster
My personal feeling is that everyone should learn how to set up their own guitars. It's fairly easy to learn, the tools are very inexpensive, and it'll be very fruitful for you in the long run as a guitarist. Check out some guides, and buy some hex keys.


I considered setting it up myself (since building my rig I've been more into building/fixing stuff myself rather than letting others do it), however I've been waiting to get this guitar for years and am scared to mess it up. Being a south pawed player, I can't really just walk in to a store and grab a guitar which is why this guitar is that bit more special
#4
If you have another, cheaper guitar, do your "maiden voyage" on her and than on the new Ibanez.

Either way you should have it set up - and it's really fairly easy to do, just scary the first time.
#5
I agree with Rooster, everyone should learn how to set up their own guitar. And I say that as a guitar tech who makes a living setting up people's guitars. My experience is that "factory setups" range from non-existant to spotty at best. And the so-called techs in most big-box stores like Guitar Center are really nothing more than string changers. So either find a good tech you can trust or learn to do it yourself.
#6
Quote by stormin1155
I agree with Rooster, everyone should learn how to set up their own guitar. And I say that as a guitar tech who makes a living setting up people's guitars. My experience is that "factory setups" range from non-existant to spotty at best. And the so-called techs in most big-box stores like Guitar Center are really nothing more than string changers. So either find a good tech you can trust or learn to do it yourself.


Me too. Learn how. It seems daft to me to pay $40 an hour for a job that just needs a few very basic tools and a bit of research and commonsense.
#7
Factory setups are usually poo.

Get a few tools. Watch a few videos off youtube. And you'll be able to setup your guitar like YOU want it.

It's never the same. Some people like high. Some like low. Some don't mind a bit of buzz. Some cant stand it.
Last edited by cheesefries at May 31, 2014,
#8
For me it really comes down to if the guitar is a fixed bridge or floating trem. Fixed bridge is very simple to setup with some basic tools but I personally can't be bothered to deal with a floating trem setup tbh. Call me lazy but all of my FR equipped guitars have been setup initially by the shop I've bought them from and the results have been fantastic.

Most shops will/should offer one free setup after buying a new guitar as well which helps because if its free I'll take it. I personally prefer a higher action and thicker gauge which requires a setup to be done anyway.

It's really a time vs money thing, but I'd personally pay the bit of change, not worry about it and get it back so you can get down to playing the thing.
#9
Like I tell all players - Learn how to DIY. Find a good, respectible, recommended luthier/tech at a mom & pop store who will take the extra time to show you what was fixed and possibly go through all the steps to set up your guitar.

I had one tech setup one of my Ibanez RG's because I just bought it and needed it for a gig that night. $42 later (yeah, it was a while ago) I had a guitar that I couldn't play. I'd never set up a Floyd Rose before, but I learned quick. Well, at least I got it to stay in tune for a few songs. I also learned that I'd chew my arm off in desperate situations.

Somewhere down the road, you WILL learn at least something about setting up your own guitar. Nobody can really do it for you, and your style will probably change. You'll probably find "that guitar," and she will be totally different than what you've been playing. Who knows, you may end up playing Righty like I did for a while with the Lefty/money shortage, and you may end up buying soldering essentials to do your own pickup swaps and wiring mods. You'll save money buying decent starter guitars (if the company does offer a Lefty model, it usually is good quality) and making it scream with your own touches.
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#10
I dont know man I set my guitars up myself because I know what kind of adjustments I prefer and that works for me so you should try that. It takes a while but its worth it.
banned
#11
I've got a really good tech who set up my Carvin and I think it was....40 bucks? I'm just really afraid of messing up the intonation and what not if I try to do it myself.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
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#12
Most issues from setting a guitar up are from improper use of the truss rod. If you don't crank the shite out of the rod most changes you make are reversible and it is merely trial and error. Granted if you're dealing with a trem then set ups take longer, but in the long run learning to do the set ups yourself saves money and you always do it to your specs. I find that some of my guitars get set up differently depending on my use for them.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, MIA Standard Strat, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Orange TV50H 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#13
Learn to do your own, there's no reason not too. The tools are cheap, buy them and after you've done 2 setups the tools paid for them selves.
http://www.philadelphialuthiertools.com/measuring-tools/ Everything you need right there except the wrenches and screwdrivers if needed but most guitars come with them anyway and for good reason too. Always make sure your using the right size allen wrench!!!!!!!