#1
Hi all,

Could do with some advice from people who have experience with the Line 6 HD floor boards.

I currently have a huge Fender Twin and A Marshall Jubilee combo. I bought the Marshall originally because the Fender was just too heavy to be lumping round everywhere.

I've recently joined a band after about 5 years in exile and have been practicing using either depending on how I feel on the day, until recently the Marshall died (probably something very minor and fixable).

Because of the weight issue, I'm toying with selling both amps (should get over £1000 I would think) and buying a used Line 6 HD. I use POD Farm on my PC and am generally happy with it, and figure for the price, it would be a viable alternative.

So, the question is - Does anyone have any experience using this range WITHOUT an amp for practice/gigging?

What is the difference between the HD3/4/500 models and is there any real reason to go for the top of the range for my needs?

I generally dial a couple of sounds into the amp and then just switch channels. I don't really use effects. The band I'm in currently is fairly rocky, and i plan on an electronic project at some point too.

I figure I could sell one of the amps and buy a HD400 and keep the other amp to gig with alongside the floor unit so I have the power to move more air if I need to.
Got it:
Pacifica 604w, Hohner G3T, PRS SE Soapbar I, Schecter Ultra I
Fender 'evil' Twin, Marshall 2554 combo
#2
I have not used this personally but I think it is worth serious consideration:

An EV ZLX12p with POD would be an excellent ultra-modern, high tech, light weight rig with 1000 watts and 126db output. The speaker sounds amazing, only weighs 32 lbs and fits on the back of a motorcycle. $400 for the EV also makes this a pretty reasonable setup for a digital modeling rig.
http://www.electrovoice.com/zlx/
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Thanks for your input.

The place I practise at has a PA already, and any place we gigged would definitely have a PA system, so, I'm not sure the speaker would be necessary.

My big concern was whether it's practical to scrap the amp entirely (other band members not being able to hear etc) and if there was any massive difference in sound quality between the different models.
Got it:
Pacifica 604w, Hohner G3T, PRS SE Soapbar I, Schecter Ultra I
Fender 'evil' Twin, Marshall 2554 combo
#4
It's hella convenient if you ask me.

The simple stuff, mildly overdriven and natural sounding stuff tend to sound better on analog amps.
For example I don't think I would personally trade silver jubilee for a pod.
I would trade a twin reverb for a pod indeed though.
That's probably related to the way I use them kinda amps though, so it's mostly a matter of personal opinion, really.

Pods though have this shit ton of amp models and cab models and routing options and stereo options and funny effects all in a single, relatively light box.

It's a matter of deciding what you prefer.
Also you may even not find the pod worse sounding, so just go trying a HD500x and see how you like it.
Name's Luca.

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#5
I think the PODs have different amounts of signal processing power. I have a HD500 however the newer 500X has even more DSP for intensive signal chains. The 500 series also supports the DT25/50 amps and the JTV series guitars if you ever were to dabble in those. The line 6 site also used to have a comparison chart showing the differences in turns of inputs and looper times etc.
#6
I have an HD500X. It is excellent for playing into a PC and recording. I would not use it live. DSP through a PA does not feel right. The sound is flat and sterile in a way that's kind of hard to explain compared to a real tube amp through real speakers.

Most people seem to want to use tube amps in the studio and use DSP live, and I have found that that is totally backwards, from a sound perspective (though yes, the convenience factor is undeniable).

So it's pretty much up to if you're comfortable with that sound/feel live.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#7
Quote by Offworld92
I have an HD500X. It is excellent for playing into a PC and recording. I would not use it live. DSP through a PA does not feel right. The sound is flat and sterile in a way that's kind of hard to explain compared to a real tube amp through real speakers.

Most people seem to want to use tube amps in the studio and use DSP live, and I have found that that is totally backwards, from a sound perspective (though yes, the convenience factor is undeniable).

So it's pretty much up to if you're comfortable with that sound/feel live.


I feel the same way actually. I can record and get great tones with a DME but live I feel disconnected somehow. I think it sounds good but something is missing for me. I still need me some tubes at this point but DMEs are getting better all the time.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by afoolandaknave
Thanks for your input.

The place I practise at has a PA already, and any place we gigged would definitely have a PA system, so, I'm not sure the speaker would be necessary.

My big concern was whether it's practical to scrap the amp entirely (other band members not being able to hear etc) and if there was any massive difference in sound quality between the different models.

Other band members will be able to hear you if you use monitors. Also, they may not even be able to hear you if you use a regular amp if the amp is not pointed at them.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
I use modelers. I'd buy the HD500 rather than the 300 or 400 (which are very difficult to sell). Short story -- you want that rather than the other two. You'll want to have a good set of headphones that are flat enough to mimic the PA response and/or some decent studio monitors that do the same. If you're going to develop user presets, you don't want to talk into a venue and need to tweak each one. That said, you'll probably do a bit of that anyway until you get used to how things sound coming out of the PA.

It's completely practical to scrap the rest of the amplification gear if you have a PA setup that your bandmates can hear you through for practice. In our case, it meant pointing the PA at us rather than at the opposite wall (which never made much sense anyway). One of the benefits is that you won't have guitar amp sounds polluting the vocal mikes. Now if you can talk the drummer into a set of electronic pads...
#11
Quote by kaup
or you could buy axe-fx 2 on credit...


Right. $2400 plus the $750 for the recommended MIDI footboard. The Axe-FX II is already being superceded by the interim XL version until they can get Axe-FX III into production.

Better line up some gigs...
#12
in all honesty though I've been looking at the POD HD Pro and browsing for a decent FRFR monitor that i might be able to afford. I feel like the new technology is slowly going to lean toward these direct setups more because of the reliability and continuous improvements to the tone and capabilities of equipment like this.

I also have a question:
POD HD500
or
POD HD Pro X

which and why?
#13
Quote by kaup
in all honesty though I've been looking at the POD HD Pro and browsing for a decent FRFR monitor that i might be able to afford. I feel like the new technology is slowly going to lean toward these direct setups more because of the reliability and continuous improvements to the tone and capabilities of equipment like this.

I also have a question:
POD HD500
or
POD HD Pro X

which and why?


Considering just those two:

The HD500 (X?) is cheaper and has the foot pedal stuff included. It's easier to toss into a soft case and cart around. The HD ProX requires a rack case and if you want the foot pedal stuff, you're looking at a Shortboard II for another $199 (or the Express for $99).

In short, $499 vs. $699 (new) plus $199. $900 (plus rack case) vs. $500. The electronics are identical (I think there may be an extra connector or two on the back of the Pro).

On the one hand, I prefer to have the electronics in the backline (which would argue for the rack mount), and I'd have a wireless back there with it in the same rack when I'm using an ordinary guitar. The nice thing about the footpedals for the Pods is that you can connect with an ethernet cable (relatively cheap) and you don't need guitar cables running back and forth or AC bricks out front to power them (as you do with the HD500).

I like both of these solutions because they accommodate the Variax guitars (I have three) and allow me to run them via an ethernet cable, and that allows me to change guitar models and alternate tunings by storing them in user presets along with the
amps/cabs/FX modeling, so that I change *everything* with a single stomp.

If you don't have a Variax, however, consider picking up the Pod HD Bean version. Easier than either of the others to carry around, and it has ALL of the electronics (except for the Variax stuff). The only thing missing are a few connectors (and, sadly, the Variax connector). Cheaper by a bunch (as low as $199 at one point near Christmas time, but $399 normally). And honestly, you don't necessarily need all of what the shortboard provides, so a $99 FBV Express,with expression, tuner display, four bank switches, tap tempo, etc.) is more than enough.
#14
Quote by kaup
in all honesty though I've been looking at the POD HD Pro and browsing for a decent FRFR monitor that i might be able to afford.


Lots of FRFR possibilities out there. The CLR from Atomic Amps runs about a grand and it's powered. The QSC K12 has been used a lot by folks. Around $800 new. Cheaper yet might be the Carvin PM15A. Powered, 15" speaker (plus tweeter), 400W (I think) RMS power.

A great compromise -- the 900W capable passive Carvin LS1503, which has a 15" LF driver,a 6" mids driver and 1" tweeter (it even has one of those "tophats" built in for putting it on a speaker stand. Add the HD 1500W power amp that puts out about 900W bridged, mono, @ 8 ohms. A bit over $500 for the pair.

Another thought: I have a pair of KRK Rokit 8's as my nearfield studio monitors. They're 100W each (divided about 75W/25W LF/HF) and will go very low and very high and up to around 109 dB. New, about $250 each (powered, of course), but the used versions of the previous model (Gen 2) are also excellent and went out the door (until the last) at around $150 each new this past Christmas and are showing up used at just over $100 each.
#15
I should qualify and say in this case my concern is largely live use. I have a halfway decent studio set up with monitors, synths and the like and am looking at this solely to play with other people.

The idea of selling both amps and having my own speaker as a monitor will be an option I imagine. I think I might buy the 400 off ebay as they go for about £160 used and look at whether i need to sell one/both amps in the future. Truth be told, I prefer the Fender to the Marshall, but it is just too heavy to carry every week. Maybe use it for gigs alongside the Line 6, and keep the modelling set up just for practise.
Got it:
Pacifica 604w, Hohner G3T, PRS SE Soapbar I, Schecter Ultra I
Fender 'evil' Twin, Marshall 2554 combo
#16
Make sure you actually try your setup before selling your current gear. Make absolutely no mistake you may be downsizing your rig but you're also talking about a substantial downgrade in tone & feel.

While you may be happy with your POD Farm on PC you need to consider the fact that you're playing it at a much lower volume than you would be playing with a band. If you were to crank the POD Farm up to a band volume you'd start to notice just how fizzy and sterile and dead the tones really are.

Also you have to consider how you're going to hear yourself. At practice you can just stick yourself through the PA, but this can often be a huge pain to get a good sound unless you're really know how to separate your guitar from the vocals on the PA. Gigs pose a bigger problem, because you'll need to either have a monitor of your own or use or you'll have to get the sound man to put you through the foldback monitors... Which are for vocals and tend to make the guitar sound absolutely horrid.

So, you'd either need to get an FRFR monitor or get a poweramp and go into a guitar cab, but if all you're using is a Line6 floorboard both options are just silly and overkill.

I had seen a lot of people using floorboards direct into the PA and I've never EVER heard one sound good.

One idea would be to find a smallish clean amp and run a Line6 into that. It still won't sound as good as your current setup, but it definitely will sound better than direct.

Another would be go for a better modelling system. Kemper, AxeFX, get a good monitor or poweramp => cab setup. But this is expensive. Very expensive.

Buy a dolly and stop carrying your amp around like a fool

Switch to a head/cab setup. Heads can weight anywhere from 10-60lbs and cabs can weigh from 25-120lbs. An Orange Tiny Terror and matching 1x12 cab is 12 pounds for the head and 30 for the cab.

But again I want to emphasize that whatever you do, find a way to try your new setup with your band before selling your old one. There is absolutely nothing worse than realizing you'd rather break your back carrying heavy gear than spend another minute playing on a setup that you can't stand the sound of.