#1
I'm a guitarist for I can't remember how long xD, maybe 5 or more years. I've been enticed how the bass guitar sounds whether rock or any mellow songs and I'm enamored by it. Here I thought I should try a new one besides a normal six strings instrument and moves to two lesser strings. I'm looking for a cheap bass that is around $200 or $350 something. I play any genres so I don't just stick to rock, but I play any kind of genres out there. I'm looking for a bass that almost covers up any songs and I can switch into whenever I like it. No need to buy a separate one for any specific genre. Also, the neck doesn't warp so easily when I put a little heavier gauge strings, and a passive bass.

I've been thinking about getting an Ibanez GSR200, but I'm not sure if it's good or not. Do Ibanez SR series matches the one that I have listed? I forgot to mention, I have small hands so getting fender basses with larger necks is kind of hard to play, well for me. Although I wanted to get one, but yeah it is kind of unfortunate for me xD. I'm not knowledgeable about basses, so list the basses you own or have owned with a better quality sound and the materials.
#3
I like the Squier line of basses but they take a huge depreciation hit if you buy one new. Look for a used one IMHO.

For the transitioning guitar player I think the Squier Jaguar Special Shortscale is the best option in the Squier line. $180 new or often found used in the $125 price range.

Personally, I think the best overall value option is to look for a used Fender MIM Jazz bass. There are tons of used ones out there and you can usually find one in the $250-$300 price range. Because it's a true Fender it holds its value and you can get your money back more often than not should you choose to sell it.

Ibanez basses are very well made with slim necks. You can often find a decent one used for $100-125.

Be thinking about what amp to get though. A cheap bass through a decent amp sounds better than the reverse.
#4
I don't think I've played a GSR200 specifically, but I do have a bass which is probably part GSR and I love it. The neck is thin and fast and it can produce a good range of sounds. My hands are also small and I have no trouble playing that at all. There are stretching exercises you can do though, and Jazz necks are thinner than PBass necks as a general rule. +1 to buying used, too. I picked my Ibanez up for about $100, including a very nice lockable flight case and a decent new set of strings. New, the case probably would have been more than that on its own.
Quote by FatalGear41
Bassists don't hover on the forum day and night like guitarists. We've got lives to lead, music to play and whiskey to drink.

Quote by Ziphoblat
I'd rather go at my hands with a hacksaw than play lead guitar, and I'm only slightly exaggerating.
#5
ESP LTD B-104. great bass, slick neck (my hands are also kind of small), very comfortable, with a very clear punchy sound. I own one , and I LOVE it. Costs about 300$ (brand new), and worth each penny. One of its competitors is the Ibanez gsr200, which is about 100$ cheaper, but for those 100$ you get better wood, better electronics and set up, better tuners (the ibanez tuners aren't that good), better structure (six bolts on the esp, four on the ibanez) and better design (on my opinion).
Last edited by rimmry at Jun 2, 2014,
#6
Quote by VeloDog
I like the Squier line of basses but they take a huge depreciation hit if you buy one new. Look for a used one IMHO.

For the transitioning guitar player I think the Squier Jaguar Special Shortscale is the best option in the Squier line. $180 new or often found used in the $125 price range.

Personally, I think the best overall value option is to look for a used Fender MIM Jazz bass. There are tons of used ones out there and you can usually find one in the $250-$300 price range. Because it's a true Fender it holds its value and you can get your money back more often than not should you choose to sell it.

Ibanez basses are very well made with slim necks. You can often find a decent one used for $100-125.

Be thinking about what amp to get though. A cheap bass through a decent amp sounds better than the reverse.


Can a squier bass cover any style of music and genre? I just need to get used to it's neck and I've done that with my classical guitar. I've tried the other day, I think it was the fretless version and I like the sound.
#7
I'm sorry guys I must be tired when I was listing some of the things I was looking for a bass. I meant active not passive, if I couldn't find any active basses in that kind prices then I should just wait I guess.