#1
(A small disclaimer up front, not important for the question: I`m new to the forum so sorry for the beginners questions. I`ve been playing guitar for quite a while but only got into acoustic guitar heavily for a relatively short time, but becuse I got more gigs with the acoustic and want to record with it more, I`ve become aware of the inadequacies of my tone and knowledge about gear and sound, which brings me to this forum.)


Recently, I became obsessed with the idea of blending diffrent pickups for the tone of my acoustic guitar. I assume this is something that has been posted on this site many times, but I am wondering about blending a specific signal chain. First, I`m gonna list the gear that I want to use, then the signal chain, and then my questions about them.

The Gear:

My guitar is equipped with an LR Baggs preamp and transducer pickup.
Boss GT-10 (pic of the back, and it`s options of connectivity - http://cms.rolandus.com/assets/image...0_back_gal.jpg)
Seymour Duncan Woody XL pickup.
Behringer: XENYX 302USB Mixer (http://www.behringer.com/assets/302USB_P0ADV_Top_XL.png)


Signal chain:

SD Woody --> Boss GT (output R/L) --> Behringer mixer (Line input R/L)
LR Baggs transducer --> Begringer mixer (Mic input)

(Reasoning: I do like some of the characteristics of the transducer pickup, but not it`s glassy highs on the treble strings, so that`s why I would be using the Woody for, and putting it through the Boss GT gives me the option of adding effects. The transducer going to the Mic input gives me some more options other than the guitar controls for the EQ-ing of the tone)
For recording, I can go from the mixer through USB to my computer/DAW, for playing live I can go the the PA or to the mixer that the band uses.


Question:

Is this something that could work? Or am I better off trying to blend two signals in a diffrent way.


PS: I know that a lot of people have opinions about digital equipment like the GT, and that the gear listed is not near anything really good, but I want to get to know the basic building blocks of tone with inexpensive equipment so I can get to know what I want and what suits me best. (Haven`t yet bought the mixer or the pickup, so if you know of any good replacements in the same price range, do tell.)

Thank you!
#2
Yes it could work but... recording acoustic guitar with a good mic and good mic technique always sounds better. Always.

I have similar pickups and play a lot of acoustic gigs. I used to do the blend thing between my Baggs ribbon transducer for excellent bottom and Baggs M1 pickup for the sweetest top end. The "getting it exactly right" live was difficult and most sound engineers didn't really get it. I have since reverted to just using mostly the ribbon because K.I.S.S. works.

Sometimes we just overthink it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 3, 2014,
#3
Yeah, I`ve been recording acoustic guitar with microphones before and that captures the essence of the guitar itself, but becuse I`ve been listening to Jon Gomm for a while now, I`m really interested in experimenting with stuff like this.

Becuse I`m a total newb when it comes to gear, even though I`ve been playing for years, here`s a couple of newb questions:

1) Are the signal chains ok? Is pluging the transducer to the mic input possible without it sounding fuzzy or something?

2) Is pluging boss output R/L to line input R/L going to give me stereo sound?


The reason I would like the signals to be separate before adding effects is becuse I would like to experiment with adding overdrive or some other effects to my tone, but from past experiences, the transducer pickups that come with guitars don`t sound good when effects other than delay, reverb or some compression are added to them. I would set up the transducer for some percussive stuff, like thumping with my palm, and to get me some mids, and the SD Woody pick up would be there for effects, general EQ-ing of the sound through the Boss GT, and to get better sound from the treble strings.
#4
I like Jon Gomm stuff too but I am just not that wildly creative.

Line out from the Boss > line in to the mixer will be fine. For transducer > mic input you will need a direct box for impedance matching. The Baggs Para DI is more $$ than a basic direct box but the eq and notch filter make it best-in-class and my favorite acoustic processing tool for live work. Give it a look:

http://www.fullcompass.com/product/445961.html?utm_source=googleps&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=googleps&gclid=CI22-9D93b4CFZFufgod168AAQ

For recording I recommend going direct from your processors into a digital interface and forget the mixer. An analog mixer will just get in the way and the DAW opens up a million experimental possibilities.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 3, 2014,
#5
Thank you very much!

What will happen if I plug the transducer to mic input witheout a box for impedance matching?

The Behringer mixer actually has an USB port so I can connect it to computer/DAW directly, so that wouldn`t be a problem. (that`s why that little mixer seems like the perfect option for me)
#6
Quote by CoolerV
Thank you very much!

What will happen if I plug the transducer to mic input witheout a box for impedance matching?

The Behringer mixer actually has an USB port so I can connect it to computer/DAW directly, so that wouldn`t be a problem. (that`s why that little mixer seems like the perfect option for me)


You will still get sound from the guitar going direct but it won't sound very musical. Huge impedance mismatch.

If the Behringer mixer allows you to record several discreet tracks at once it might be useful but this sounds like the hard way. A good quality interface will handle all inputs with impedance matching and send your inputs directly to a fully functional DAW with unlimited eq and effects on every input. This is what I would do and skip all the mixer/direct box/Boss processor stuff. Recording quality will be 10x better. Record different pickups on separate tracks and add effects and blending later during mixdown.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 3, 2014,
#7
Again, than you for your replies! This will definately help me in my research, I`m really starting to be more aware of what goes in making a good personalized tone.
#8
I have a set up that uses a Maton AP5 piezo/preamp passively combined with a magnetic soundhole pickup. The magnetic is wired in series with the hot output of the preamp, via a push-pull pot for phase and volume. It works very well, and I can get a blend of any volume from either pickup, with tone control on the piezo only. The magnetic works even when the battery is pulled from the preamp, so it also acts as a backup in the event of battery failure.


This is a pic of the magnetic, with the volume/phase pot on a bracket stuck to the inside of the soundhole: