#1
My band have recently let our synth player go. So we are currently just a three piece going forward.

We always had this issue previously, but the added synth made the sound fuller etc. etc.

Now as a three piece I (guitarist) often get lost in the mix. Especially when the drums are snare and cymbol heavy (mostly the cymbols).

My limited understanding tells me that there is a lot of overlap around the low-mid frequencies. On my amp my Mids are all the way up, the bass is all the way down and the treble sits at 12 o'clock.

So I'm going to have to do something to find my space in the mix, but being an instrument that really works in the mid frequencies I am not sure exactly what I need to do.

If I cut mids will i disappear even more?

Should I maybe be cutting other frequencies rather than boosting mids?

I'm just looking for some recommendations that I can try. I know that there are likely to be a lot of factors, but I don't really know where to start.
#2
Generally, if you are lost in the live mix and need to cut through, you could:
-Boost the mids/treble/presence of your amp, you could try a treble booster pedal.
-Get the bassist to reduce his bass/mid fequencies.
-Turn your guitar up.
-Use less distortion.
Hope this helps...
#3
Thanks,

Thinking about it, my bassist does like his mids. So may get him to cut them a little. It is my clean channel so maybe volume is an issue rather than gain, however I tend to turn up until the sound engineer tells me to turn down! So I'll also try boosting more high mids and treble I guess.
#4
I think the best way is to find your tone, then have the others balance with you so you still cut through enough, messing with your tone just to cut through is sort of working backwards
#5
Lost in the mix with a three piece band? Turn up, or have them turn down. I doubt this is an eq problem but need to hear a live recording to be sure. Point your amp at your face, not your knees so you can always hear it and let the engineer worry about the mix.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

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#7
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Yeah, in a three piece. That's one of the reasons why I am so confused, but a couple of people have said it. Obviously I am not in the audience so I can't get the front of house effect.


Get yourself a long long lead and get off stage to have a listen for yourself - it's the only way.

(I really don't get on how you can be lost in a 3 piece though, it's almost impossible)
#8
1) set all your amp eq controls to 5 - your equing doesn't make any sense by any standard, unless your amp is really completely terrible.

2) get your drummer to tone down his cymbal bashing. Drummers that play too loud are pretty much the cause of 99% of live sound issues. It takes skill to play with intensity but with a controlled volume - get him/her working on that.

3) If 1) and 2) fail, get a new amp that sounds good with the eq set flat.

If you can't cut through as a guitarist in a three piece band, you have serious problems as a band in relation to your sound or arrangements, or both. You should rarely, if ever, have to do any extreme equing on your amp or elsewhere.
#9
Quote by slapfunk_101
-Get the bassist to reduce his bass/mid fequencies.


i would try this. i remember seeing Arch Enemy one time, and the bassist's signal suddenly cut out. i could immediately hear what the guitars were doing so much more clearly, and i was actually a little disappointed when they fixed the problem.
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#10
I borrowed a wireless one time for a sound check and went way out to the back, it was so cool, sounded amazing! Great way to check
#11
Give yourself SOME bass. maybe somewhere between 9-12 oclock. for EQing, start with all the settings at 12 oclock and adjust from their.

Sometimes less gain is helpful for cutting through if your fingers/guitar sound good that way.

Have your bassist cut his mids. Individual tone means nothing in a band, what sounds good alone might not sound good together. Maybe have him cut his mids down, and experiment with distortion on the bass. It can help blend the two depending on your style.

What kind of music is it? lol
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#12
Quote by reverb66


2) get your drummer to tone down his cymbal bashing. Drummers that play too loud are pretty much the cause of 99% of live sound issues. It takes skill to play with intensity but with a controlled volume - get him/her working on that.



I think you've probably nailed it right there. I'll change eq and give that a go also.

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What kind of music is it? lol


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#13
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Yeah, in a three piece. That's one of the reasons why I am so confused, but a couple of people have said it. Obviously I am not in the audience so I can't get the front of house effect.


So you are loud enough on stage to hear what you are playing?

One thing is that audience members aren't sound engineers or musicians and your mates want to hear you above the rest of the band. Our keyboard players husband mixed for us a couple of times and his wife was louder than the rest of the band put together when i listened to the recordings after the gig!

Your mix may be ok, talk to the sound engineer first.

If you are sure it is bad then work with the bassist on EQ and volumes. Bear in mind that it may also be to do with room acoustics and may not happen at other venues.
#14
Point your amp at your ears. You would hear yourself even if you were actually quiter than the rest of the band because your amp is pointing at your ears.

Also, make the bassist turn down a bit and tell your drummer not to play so loud.
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#15
Thanks Phil,

Yeah I can hear what I am playing no problem. The sound engineer at our last gig said that there was an issue and that the cymbals in that particular room would cause this issue and that the drummer would need to play quieter, but I have had a lot of people over the last year that have said they struggle to hear me, but the majority of the time that would be with the Synth player in tow so he would be taking all the frequencies!

Our last gig was reviewed and our sound got panned due to them not being able to hear me. However a number of "non-friend" contacts there said we sounded better without the synth player as they could hear all the instruments.

Maybe I am reading into it too much and it is a case of "you can't please everyone".
#16
bass-player.....I´m guessing he´s hogging some of the mids. The cymbal bashing will make you diseapear in close proximity but if the audience has trouble hearing you and your miced through the PA than it´s the bass player boggarting the mids.
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