#1
Hello guys! I am not new to the forums, but this is my first post so keep that in mind. (Also, if this is in wrong section I apologize.)

So I have been playing guitar for about 9 years. At first, I only played electric. When I went off to college, I fell in love with acoustic. However, my acoustic guitar I feel is lacking and I would love to add some extra spice. I want to add some percussive strumming like this fellow here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPHUvoG5Pkg.
Does anyone have any tips on how I start learning this? Is there a name to that strumming technique? I have searched the internet and only came up with things of this nature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq7vdQAyU_U. I already know how to do this and would love to add more.
I'm usually pretty good at picking up new concepts so I would love to start adding this to some of my songs I play. Thank you in advance!

-Steven
#2
Just experiment with the different sounds you get from various places on your guitar and hands; there can be a distinct difference between finger tips and your wrist, for example, and big differences between hitting the large part of the body around the bridge, and the higher parts near where the neck joins the body. If you are after specific rhythms, be mindful of whether you are strumming up or down. Some of the techniques he uses are flamenco golpes, and he even throws a rasqueado/rasgueado or two in there. What he does isn't flamenco, however, so don't go and master flamenco as a prelude to this.

I recommend setting your fingers into groups; thumb for strumming and golpes (hitting the guitar), index and middle for strumming, ring finger for golpes, or you could use your thumb for golpes all upstrokes, index and middle for downstrokes, ring for golpes. There are a lot of ways to do this, and after you try out a few may find yourself favouring particular combinations, but you will still have to make use of several to get the desired sounds.

I'll give you an idea to get you started. Its not as complicated as the example given, but I think it will suffice for a starting point. All the rhythms are the same length, as you want to keep up that constant effect. If you want some chords to go with this try alternating between A major and Bb major (once per bar or two bars) for a very flamenco sound.

Golpe, muted upstroke, downstroke chord, golpe, muted upstroke, downstroke chord, golpe, upstroke chord

Or if its easier to read an abbreviated version:

G, um, dc, g, um, dc, g, uc

These can be very hard to at first, so be patient, and do a lot of slow practice.
#3
Thank you. I will definitely look up flamenco golpes and even check out reaqueado. I'll also practice that exercise and let you know how things go. Thank you for the suggestions.

-Steven