#1
Perhaps I am the only one in existence that likes to play scales. I see it as a challenge. Yes, I'm new. In time, I'm sure I will get bored with it. but for now I enjoy playing scales. With that said, my taste is primarily metal music and I have been searching for the scales that will lend itself useful to my taste. I have googled and found many penatonic scales but it seems that those are mostly bluesy style. Not that I can't learn from those scales. I play them for fun, but I wanted to get a better scale(s) for metal. I found this on UG, what do you think?

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/music_styles/killer_heavy_metal_method_for_beginners_to_intermediate.html


Also, anything that you can lend me in pursuit of metal happiness will be much appreciated.
#2
There are no such thing as "metal scales", since there are no scales that are exclusive to metal. The scales primarily used in metal are the minor pentatonic, major, minor and harmonic minor scales. But then again, all of those are found in jazz and classical aswell.

Its not a matter of which notes you play, but how you play them.
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#4
Phrygian scales/modes lend themselves to metal in cool ways. Played on acoustic they have a very strong, romantic sound. Played with distortion they can take a very sinister tone.
I would check out the Phrygian mode, and if you like that definitely check out Hungarian Minor scale. The Phrygian mode is a mode of the major scale, so it can sound relatively tame compared to H. minor. H. minor is a different beast altogether.
With a #4, natural 5, and b6 scale degrees it has 3 semi-tones places right next to each other. Very unique and vast possibility for discord.. Like Phrygian it is a minor scale, but traditionally it has a natural 2 as opposed to Phrygian's b2. Some food for thought.
Some other scales you might want to check out:
-Phrygian dominant
-Harmonic minor and it's modes
#5
I've started learning the modes and I've found that Phrygian and Lydian are often used in metal. I've also read that harmonic minor scales are good for that.

I've never put them into practice though as my "metal" days were before I even knew what a scale is.
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#6
Quote by chrismendiola
I've started learning the modes and I've found that Phrygian and Lydian are often used in metal. I've also read that harmonic minor scales are good for that.

I've never put them into practice though as my "metal" days were before I even knew what a scale is.


... I don't know what metal you've been listening to but lydian is, in my experience, one of the rarest sounds in metal.

Frankly modes are completely unnecessary anyway and 'metal' scales don't exist. There are scales. There is metal. The things that make metal what it is really aren't the scales.
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#7
A lot of metal (at least the older stuff I used to listen to) is based very much on pentatonic minor. Played with heavy distortion it's very metal sounding and of course a ton of metal stuff has its roots in the blues. After that your natural minor scale (Aeolian mode) is good for a 7 note scale and 3 notes per string fast licks. As mentioned Phrygian mode is nice and sinister and the harmonic minor scale is popular with some.

Just try the minor modes and see which has a sound you like. I used to be fond of Dorian for metal / hard rock as well. Of course there's Locrian which can sound extremely dark, but the flat fifth would tend to clash with the perfect fifth of your power chords, but I suppose you could leave the fifth out and just play root octave "chords" which can sound kind of cool. It's all fun stuff to experiment around with.
Last edited by gtc83 at Jun 4, 2014,
#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
... I don't know what metal you've been listening to but lydian is, in my experience, one of the rarest sounds in metal.


It tends to be common enough in folk metal, but that's about it.
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#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
... I don't know what metal you've been listening to but lydian is, in my experience, one of the rarest sounds in metal.

Frankly modes are completely unnecessary anyway and 'metal' scales don't exist. There are scales. There is metal. The things that make metal what it is really aren't the scales.

I couldn't tell you- metal isn't my thing, and I've only started learning modes. Maybe I got them mixed up, but I remember one of the free lessons I've seen on the web where somebody plays through the modes through different genres, making that claim.

Truth be told, I'm pretty sure I have my modes mixed in my head.
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#10
Quote by chrismendiola
Truth be told, I'm pretty sure I have my modes mixed in my head.


Almost everyone does. They instantly overcomplicate most playing when just good knowledge of the key and backing or a good ear is literally all you need.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.