#1
I had a few questions regarding eq settings, namely a trend Ive been noticing in my preferences.

I seem to have an adversion to treble, specifically with medium-high gain settings. I am constantly scooping my treble. I usually have it around 4/10, and my mids at 5-7 and bass at 5.

Is there anything unusual/problematic from a mixing standpoint about this? Whenever I look at "suggested settings" i usually see treble at 7/10. But on all three of my amps, treble just sounds terrible in person that high up. I know there are more factors in play (like presence setting, or where youre standing). My presence is usually at 6/10 and i prefer to sit right in line with my 4x12.

Also- i notice that using a high pass filter in recording metal is pretty common.. but does anybody use high pass in their effects loop? I have a mxr 10 band and i tried cutting 31hz and 62hz by -12 db. It sounded pretty decent. Anybody else do this? Thanks
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#2
If it sounds good to you, it probably is. Trust your ears.

HPF on a guitar amp? Not usually necessary. The lowest note on a 6 string is 82 hz and most quality guitar amps employ some HPF circuitry anyways. If you do use one, you want it before the preamp and not in the effects loop. Killing any rumble before it hits the amp will give you more definition.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

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#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
If it sounds good to you, it probably is. Trust your ears.

HPF on a guitar amp? Not usually necessary. The lowest note on a 6 string is 82 hz and most quality guitar amps employ some HPF circuitry anyways. If you do use one, you want it before the preamp and not in the effects loop. Killing any rumble before it hits the amp will give you more definition.


+1 i usually set it there or even lower, but i am a 2-3, but sometimes more, but tubes make a difference. what you hear in front of it is that the audience hear from it.

above all as cajun said "Trust your ears".
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#4
If you're playing with a band, you definitely want your trebles higher. It means it is clearer in the mix. Your job is to be a treble instrument, and to let the bassist fill out the lows. However if you are playing by yourself, and it sounds good to you, then yeah be as bassy as you like.
#5
Quote by gutguitar
If you're playing with a band, you definitely want your trebles higher. It means it is clearer in the mix. Your job is to be a treble instrument, and to let the bassist fill out the lows. However if you are playing by yourself, and it sounds good to you, then yeah be as bassy as you like.


that goes for gigging too for me anyways. i always cut through. fuckin' splawn PM's cut through just about anything. and its got a tung sol in one of the earlier gain stages, so i have to tame it a little bit. it was freshly retubed when i bought it, but once i go all JJ's i am sure i will bump up the treble, however i sometimes will increase the presence.
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alright "king of the guitar forum"


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nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
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#6
Yeah it's fine if you're alone but you may have to adjust it in a band scenario. Not enough treble and you might just get muddled in with the bass. It also really depends. Fenders for example tend to be incredibly bright so you'd turn down your treble to compensate.
#7
Quote by Jmoarguitar
Yeah it's fine if you're alone but you may have to adjust it in a band scenario. Not enough treble and you might just get muddled in with the bass. It also really depends. Fenders for example tend to be incredibly bright so you'd turn down your treble to compensate.


on my mark and rec the treble is around noon or just shy of, splawns lower, Fryette differs by channels, but i don't gig that amp (its nice to have at my other house, because i can get stunning cleans for my tele and strat, and a nice bluesy on channel two and full on metal for channel three. so it has plenty of uses.

and in reality you have to adjust at every gig for that gig, just depends how you are mic'd (or not) and how the room is and the size of the stage and height of the stage. how deep the room is.
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alright "king of the guitar forum"


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nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
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2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#8
Several things at play here.

One, 4x12s beam treble. Pretty much everything from 500Hz on up is available on axis, but drops off as soon as you're off axis.

Two, most players playing alone cut their treble because it really shows up mistakes. The better players leave it alone.

Most presence knobs are little more than a slight boost in treble. Some are actual presence knobs that adjust the negative feedback to the power tubes (as you approach zero negative feedback, you'll find the amp developing a bit more "hair" when you dig in, even on the clean channel, and a bit more finger response). So you may be dialing one down and the other up, and both at odds with each other.

It's fine to dial out the low frequencies. Most 4x12s fall off sharply below 110Hz anyway, but with the HPF kicked in, you're not wasting power trying to reproduce those inaudible frequency notes. And yes, that falloff means that you're not reproducing the fundamental of a low open E string, which is why it tickles me to watch the metal folks downtuning, only to plug into an amp that's ignoring them. In the cases where an amp/speaker system is incapable of reproducing the fundamentals, it fills in the gap by reproducing the mathematical set of harmonics that "indicate" that note. What you actually hear are low mids and mids.

When you're mixing, you'll want those highs back. What you get from a close-miked 4x12 is much different from what you hear wandering on and off axis, so if you're miked, you want to go by what you hear from the PA (or in the recording) rather than what your amp sounds like. You want to set your guitar for mids and high mids if you want to cut through the mix. Low mids are the province of the bass player, and you'll just add mud if you go there. For maximum punch, you want the kick and the bass to be very clear. Give them their own space.