#1
Hello guys
I bought an Ibanez Iron Label, but I have just realized that the strings are not thick enough to go down to drop C. Already in standard E I am getting a little buzz from the low E (is that supposed to happen by the way?).

So.. This was anticipated (that I needed other strings), but I didn't anticipate the fact that the string gauge perhaps won't fit in the guitar nut.

It feels very annoying to have this kind of issue. The reason why I lack expertise to anticipate how thick the strings could be, is due to me playing on a flyod rose, having absolutely no idea about a regular guitar.

So. The Iron Label has a seventh string version too. Should I give this back to the store, as it has several problems, which a new guitar shouldn't have and invest in a guitar with an extra string, or is there another solution I am too blind to see ?

Thanks!!
#2
For that buzz you mention - do you mean fret buzz (i.e. you hear it when you play a fretted note) because that's going to show up with nearly any guitar. Usually a good setup can minimise fret buzz, quite a few players are happy to accept a little bit if it lets them have the action lower.

For the nut, I doubt you'll have any trouble going up a couple of gauges if that's what you're thinking. You'd probably only need to start worrying about the nut if you were going as high as 12's or 13's. If you like the tension of the set of 9's when it's in standard tuning, I'd probably try something like a 10-52 set for Drop C. I've had 10-52 sets on a couple of non-floyd guitars no problem.

If you want the seven-string then go for it. But what are the 'several problems' with your guitar?
#3
Quote by Confuse-a-Cat
For that buzz you mention - do you mean fret buzz (i.e. you hear it when you play a fretted note) because that's going to show up with nearly any guitar. Usually a good setup can minimise fret buzz, quite a few players are happy to accept a little bit if it lets them have the action lower.

For the nut, I doubt you'll have any trouble going up a couple of gauges if that's what you're thinking. You'd probably only need to start worrying about the nut if you were going as high as 12's or 13's. If you like the tension of the set of 9's when it's in standard tuning, I'd probably try something like a 10-52 set for Drop C. I've had 10-52 sets on a couple of non-floyd guitars no problem.

If you want the seven-string then go for it. But what are the 'several problems' with your guitar?


Thanks for the quick response man!

As for the buzz, it's not really fret buzz. It happens when I pick the low E with my finger, a little harder than I usually do in standard tuning. In drop C tuning (with my current strings), it happens just by picking the low E (C, as its in dropc) string normally.

The reason why I fear the nut, is due to the fact that the nut holes already seem to be filled up with the strings. It's hard to explain, but basically, it looks like there isn't anymore space. I am however not sure whether they installed 9's or 10's on my guitar. I suppose it's 9's as it's really hard to speed pick the low E in drop C.

The several problems are not really that many, but include: Very rusty strings, scratches here and there (not small) and some white paint on the back of the neck.

I don't want to sound spoiled, calling these problems, but having paid full price, for a new guitar, I would rather have a guitar without these issues.
#4
Ah okay. I might have guessed that the buzz was caused by trem springs, except you said it's a non-floyd model! Is the nut slot cut too low for that string? That might possibly cause it.

Yeah, I understand what you mean with the strings 'filling' the nut. I've got a couple of guitars that I'm sure I had a 0.052 on the low E, now I've got 0.046's. The strings I've got on at the moment really look like they fill the nut slot even though there were bigger strings before. Like I said, I don't think it'll be a problem unless you get something really big.

I wouldn't really list rusty strings as a problem - you pretty much expect to have to change your strings on a new guitar. But the others do sound annoying. I would be irritated too, and I can completely understand you wanting something without those problems. When you spend however much on a new guitar, it ought to be 'right'. If those things irritate you, then returning it would be a good idea. But any other guitar you get will probably end up having some *small* imperfections of its own. So, as long as you're not expecting the replacement to be completely flawless you should be good.
#5
Just widen out the slots until the heavier strings fit.

Also having corroded strings when you just bought the guitar is not something to get riled over. Consider how far that guitar has had to be shipped, how it has gone through different climates and how long the guitar has been sitting at the store. Having corroded strings on a brand new guitar comes with the territory.

Having a guitar that isn't set up for your needs right out of the box comes with the territory for the same reasons.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 8, 2014,
#6
The string gauge was 10's, I have considered to buy 12's, will that damage the guitar? Now that it is only 2 numbers higher?
#7
You won't damage it.
Ibanez Prestige RG852MPB
Ibanez Prestige RG652KFX
ESP E-II M-1
LTD AW-7
Schecter Loomis NT
EVH 5150 III 50
PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#8
Ah, great! That's good news I just wanted to hear. Will I have adjust the truss rod or similar in that case, or is changing the strings sufficient?

I have to note that I will go back and forth between standard E and drop A/B/C.
Last edited by Cyrox at Jun 10, 2014,
#9
Go to somebody and make a new nut for the fat strings and keep the old one in case you want to sell your guitar.

On a different note, I find you should stick to a single tuning, no mater which one it is. If you like drops, why didn't you just get a 7 string or a baritone ?
#10
Quote by realsmoky
Go to somebody and make a new nut for the fat strings and keep the old one in case you want to sell your guitar.

On a different note, I find you should stick to a single tuning, no mater which one it is. If you like drops, why didn't you just get a 7 string or a baritone ?


The baritone version and the 7th string version are a bit more expensive. A bit too much, I am afraid, as I don't have 200$ extra to pay for it unfortunately. Although you are right, I imagined switching back and forth from tuning to tuning.. What I was wondering was, if it would damage the guitar changing back and forth. Perhaps the truss rod has to be adjusted and maybe, strings will break more often, but will I make any permanent damage by switching back and forth a few times whenever I pick up the guitar?