#1
I have the opportunity to buy an Ibanez S5470 for a great price. My only concern is the locking nut. I have never owned one but I have witnessed others break a string during a gig and it took way too long to replace the string and get things back in tune. I am wondering if anyone has replaced, or simply removed, the locking nut and still enjoy the functionality of the tremolo? The Fender LSR looks interesting as a replacement. I imagine it would not work as well, but would it still work as a guitar that didn't have a locking nut to begin with like a Strat? Also, would I have to go with locking tuners? Too many expensive changes and the Ibanez won't be worth it.

Thanks for lending your experience.
#3
That's why you have a backup guitar at all times when gigging, its called being prepared
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#4
Quote by Robbgnarly
That's why you have a backup guitar at all times when gigging, its called being prepared


I do have a back up. What technique do you use that enables faster string changes when using a back up?
#5
Quote by BigMaxAttack
I do have a back up. What technique do you use that enables faster string changes when using a back up?

You swap guitars and worry about restringing either after the set or gig. never replace a string while on stage, it is very unprofessional.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Quote by BigMaxAttack
I have the opportunity to buy an Ibanez S5470 for a great price. My only concern is the locking nut. I have never owned one but I have witnessed others break a string during a gig and it took way too long to replace the string and get things back in tune. I am wondering if anyone has replaced, or simply removed, the locking nut and still enjoy the functionality of the tremolo?


You're overthinking. Replacing a locking nut with a standard nut is a bit of a PIA because a "shelf" has been created to handle the locking nut, and that shelf doesn't exist for a standard nut. The point of a locking trem is to maintain tuning while you're using the trem. It's considered an improvement over a Fender trem for exactly that reason, and the improvement was the addition of a locking nut (the fine tuners on a Floyd-like-trem were necessitated by the locking nut AFTER the locking nut was produced).

If restringing after a broken string is primary on your mind, buy a different guitar.
#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
You swap guitars and worry about restringing either after the set or gig. never replace a string while on stage, it is very unprofessional.

extremely unprofessional!
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#8
Quote by dspellman
You're overthinking. Replacing a locking nut with a standard nut is a bit of a PIA because a "shelf" has been created to handle the locking nut, and that shelf doesn't exist for a standard nut. The point of a locking trem is to maintain tuning while you're using the trem. It's considered an improvement over a Fender trem for exactly that reason, and the improvement was the addition of a locking nut (the fine tuners on a Floyd-like-trem were necessitated by the locking nut AFTER the locking nut was produced).

If restringing after a broken string is primary on your mind, buy a different guitar.


This is a very helpful answer. I will probably get the Ibanez. Thank you.
#9
Quote by Robbgnarly
That's why you have a backup guitar at all times when gigging, its called being prepared


This ... and its also a great reason to have many guitars ... well thats what I tell the wife anyway

If you are breaking strings a lot then you either have sharp "bits" on the bridge saddles or your strings are to light for your playing technique......before you do anything go up a gauge in strings