#1
I've been playing guitar for quite some time now, but the one thing I can't get to the best of my ability would be the movement between chords, they don't sound smooth enough.

This problem doesn't actually bother me much for open chords, I play them fine, however, what I do struggle with is power chords. I CAN play them, but I however just can't get them to sound smooth enough when i'm switching strings (e.g when I play a G power chord, there will be a slight pause when switching to let's say to a D power chord)

And just for notes - I haven't exactly got the best wrist strength either, I have quite weak wrists, they do ache quite a lot when i'm playing for a while, but i'm working on that.

Thanks
#2
I wouldn't worry about grip strength regarding power chords –*maybe with bar chords, but power chords aren't really that different than open chords in the strength department. (I used to find them easier than open chords when I started out.)

Maybe someone else has a good exercise for this, but otherwise, I think it's one of those case where if you practice, the speed will follow.

Also, I don't know how you're playing them, but I you might want to try putting your pinky down on the next string right below your ring finger when you play power chords. This is an octave higher than the root that you're playing with your index finger, so it doesn't change the nature of the chord –*but I found it easier when I was learning to play them.
#3
Quote by TreblePunkette
This problem doesn't actually bother me much for open chords, I play them fine, however, what I do struggle with is power chords. I CAN play them, but I however just can't get them to sound smooth enough when i'm switching strings (e.g when I play a G power chord, there will be a slight pause when switching to let's say to a D power chord)


What is it about the transition that fumbles you up? Can you be more specific?

Also, are you playing them with the 1st & 5th only (index finger and ring finger)? Or are you adding the octave in (pinky finger added)?
#4
The first thing I do when switching from one chord to another is look for any fingers that I don't have to move. Then I can use them as a reference point for the rest of the chord. With power chords however, that's not really an option in most cases. Pretty much all you can do for those is familiarize yourself with the guitar more and practice more.

As for your wrists aching, you probably aren't using proper technique. You want to always keep your wrist as straight as possible. Raise the guitar up a bit, and angle the neck up. Obviously, you won't always be able to keep your wrist perfectly straight, but always try to find a comfortable position, with a wrist that's as straight as possible.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#5
Quote by Junior#1
The first thing I do when switching from one chord to another is look for any fingers that I don't have to move. Then I can use them as a reference point for the rest of the chord. With power chords however, that's not really an option in most cases. Pretty much all you can do for those is familiarize yourself with the guitar more and practice more.

As for your wrists aching, you probably aren't using proper technique. You want to always keep your wrist as straight as possible. Raise the guitar up a bit, and angle the neck up. Obviously, you won't always be able to keep your wrist perfectly straight, but always try to find a comfortable position, with a wrist that's as straight as possible.



Just practice the chords you're transitioning to slowly it's really that simple.
#6
Quote by Black_devils
Just practice the chords you're transitioning to slowly it's really that simple.


+1 - there is no trick except practice.
#7
I was having problems with that when I was first starting out, so I developed the bad technique of using my pinky to fret both of the higher notes instead of the proper way of using my ring finger and pinky finger, but, 8 years later, still works fine for me.

It's just repetition and more repetition.
#8
Quote by Alligatorfish
I wouldn't worry about grip strength regarding power chords –*maybe with bar chords, but power chords aren't really that different than open chords in the strength department. (I used to find them easier than open chords when I started out.)

Maybe someone else has a good exercise for this, but otherwise, I think it's one of those case where if you practice, the speed will follow.

Also, I don't know how you're playing them, but I you might want to try putting your pinky down on the next string right below your ring finger when you play power chords. This is an octave higher than the root that you're playing with your index finger, so it doesn't change the nature of the chord –*but I found it easier when I was learning to play them.


Yeah, I almost always play power chords with my index, ring and pinky finger, I think when only played with the index and ring finger they sound a bit dull and not as full