#1
I'm looking at buying own guitar, for the first time and a
LTD LTD LMH100QMNT Quilt Maple Top Electric Guitar in Reindeer Blue has caught my eye. The things I don't like about it are no wammy bar (but will I ever use it?) and not sure where the jack is.

But what I came here for is locking nut, this guitar does not have one, should I go for a guitar that does? I really don't know anything about locking nuts.

Thanks,
Higgins909
#2
The 'NT' at the end of an LTD guitars model name basically means it's a fixed bridge variant of a guitar that may have a Floyd Rose bridge as an option.

You only really need a locking nut if your guitar has a Floyd Rose.

If your guitar had a locking nut and it was a fixed bridge you'd never be able to tune it with the nut locked down! (unless the bridge has fine tuners, but most guitars that are fixed bridge don't)
Quote by higgins909

The things I don't like about it are no wammy bar (but will I ever use it?)

That's a question you need to answer for yourself. I'd recommend you avoid a guitar like a 100 Series LTD with a Floyd Rose because they usually suck on cheap guitars. They're also a pain in the ass to set up properly for beginners.
and not sure where the jack is.

They're usually in the lower corner of the guitar.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 8, 2014,
#3
Great info!

But this guitar would be ok because it is a fixed bridge?

For a guitar that had a Floyd Rose and lock, wouldn't you still tune it by head? wouldn't the other way mess up intonation?
#4
It'll be fine. Fixed bridges are much preferred in many situations to a Floyd. Mainly because it's far easier to set the guitar up, there is a lot less to go wrong, and generally sustain is better too.

With the Floyd Rose guitar, you only use the machine heads to tune the guitar initially. From there the nut is locked down and you use the fine tuners at the bridge to check the tuning again. Using fine tuners doesn't effect the intonation because it doesn't move the intonation saddles to tune the strings.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 8, 2014,
#5
If your questioning if you'll use a whammy bar then you probably won't, don't get a floyd on a cheap guitar it will suck compared to a fixed bridge equivalent. Also you don't seem to understand how a floyd rose works in the first place so you'd be confused as hell when you got it in your hands. You don't use the machine heads when the locking nut is engaged, you use the machine heads to get the tuning close to where you want it (you want it flat as opposed to sharp), lock the nut, then tune with the fine tuners on the bridge. Even then you still have to stretch your strings out, adjust the springs in the back of the guitar, intonation is a pain in the ass and was designed by a moron (at least on my UV777 it is/was), to much hassle, especially for your first guitar. I know a kid that bought a guitar with a floyd rose, he couldn't play it for weeks because he didn't understand it, after that it was still out of tune most of the time.
Last edited by maowcat at Jun 8, 2014,
#6
I own a few guitars- some have a Floyd Rose and a locking nut, some just a fixed bridge. As the other user posted, the locking nut is for floyd rose- it prevents the guitar going out of tune when you're doing dive bombs and using the tremolo a lot.

There are some negatives to having a floyd with a locking nut. One is that maintenance becomes a little more troublesome- particularly if you want to adjust string gauge or tuning. It involves a bit of fiddling around with bridge height, tension of the springs at the back of the block, etc. It just takes some time to get it set up to a good standard.

Another issue is with low quality or licensed floyds if you have one open string ringing out and you bend another string, you may cause the open string to adjust its pitch. This is because the bridge is floating, so adding tension causes it to shift. I've never tried this on a really high quality floyd rose, but I've heard it is less of an issue. For me this is something that is just frustrating more than a huge issue, I don't have the problem that often but when I do it just annoys me a little.

On the other hand, the guitars with floyd rose bridges rarely require tuning and usually have a good action if they're set up well.

If you're unfamiliar with floyd rose, don't think you'll use the tremolo much, or don't want the hassle then I would go for a fixed bridge.

I can't say which of my guitars I prefer because they suit different areas, but I will say that the fixed bridge guitars require little to no maintenance compared to the floyd.

I would honestly suggest playing a few, and seeing whether you could see yourself using it. The lack of locking nut on a fixed bridge is normal and won't negatively affect the guitar.
#7
Ok, it sounds like you have never owned your own electric guitar. I would NOT buy a guitar with a Floyd Rose for your first guitar. Get a fixed bridge guitar, and learn how to maintain and care for that.

A Floyd Rose system is a lot more work to set up and so on. You want to learn the basics of guitar care with a guitar that's relatively easy to learn the setup, maintain, clean, etc. With a Floyd Rose system, there's more parts and the system isn't easy for beginners to learn to do the setup on such a system. (Fyi, "setup", which involves several things, is important to your guitar's health. It includes adjusting action, intonation, tuning, and more. All of the steps of setup are key towards making your guitar sound good.) So, look...if you just want a good cheap-ish guitar, don't get one with a Floyd Rose*.


*I am VERY, VERY leery of cheap guitars that include a Floyd Rose system. Why? Because the materials of the Floyd Rose tend to be bad quality. You do NOT want bad quality materials on any part of your guitar, but especially not on a system like that. Nothing is worse than the metal of the block mechanism warping over time, because it wasn't made of good quality metal. DO NOT BUY A CHEAP GUITAR THAT INCLUDES A FLOYD ROSE SYSTEM, PLEASE. You will be happier in the long run.


Edit:
Quote by maowcat
intonation is a pain in the ass and was designed by a moron (at least on my UV777 it is/was)

What are you on about?...

Intonation on Floyd Roses is just fine. It's a similar system to Fender intonation, in that you detune the strings and then move the individual bridge blocks forward to adjust intonation. It works just fine. Yes, it's a pain in the ass FOR A BEGINNER; it shouldn't be an issue for someone who has some experience in caring for their own guitar.

Also, the UV777 is fairly good quality guitar, and it is not made out of cheap materials. It runs around $1500-2000, depending on where you buy it. Guitars in that price range are definitely above average quality. So, although it's possible you got the one "bad one" which was somehow more of a pain to intonate than the other UV777s, I find that possibility unlikely. (Ibanez has a good reputation, in regards to quality control, after all.)
Iirc, the UV777s have the original Edge 7 Pro bridge, which are good quality (unlike the Edge Pro 3, which are bad quality). I have no idea why you think the intonation is "a pain", unless you just thought Floyd Rose systems in general were a pain.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jun 9, 2014,
#8
Quote by higgins909
Great info!

But this guitar would be ok because it is a fixed bridge?

For a guitar that had a Floyd Rose and lock, wouldn't you still tune it by head? wouldn't the other way mess up intonation?


initially before you lock down the nut yes you would tune normally. the fine TUNERS at the bridge are to do just that fine tune it once it is locked. often when you lock the nut you will need to tweek the tuning due to the pressure on the strings from locking. this has nothing to do with intonation (which has to do with the notes everywhere on the neck being in tune when played.) if you aren't using a trem then a locking nut really isn't needed. what many do is get locking tuners for added tuning stability. these aren't the same as a locking nut as they don't actually lock the strings in place like the nut. instead the lock the string to the tuner so that you don't need wraps around the tuning pegs. this greatly reduces the chance of the stings binding at the nut.
#9
Quote by higgins909
I'm looking at buying own guitar, for the first time and a
LTD LTD LMH100QMNT Quilt Maple Top Electric Guitar in Reindeer Blue has caught my eye. The things I don't like about it are no wammy bar (but will I ever use it?) and not sure where the jack is.

But what I came here for is locking nut, this guitar does not have one, should I go for a guitar that does? I really don't know anything about locking nuts.

Thanks,
Higgins909


If there's no whammy, there shouldn't be a locking nut.
In fact, if it's not a Kahler or Floyd Rose, there's no point in a locking nut, even if the guitar has a whammy.
If this is your first guitar, you probably don't need a whammy, and you probably won't want one for a while; it'll just get in your way.

The jack location will be obvious once you have the guitar in hand.