#1
In your opinion whats the most stable stock electric guitar for keeping intonation/tuning. Reason is I have had a run of inexpensive guitars and have had a nightmare of a time keeping them intonated. I currently have an affinity strat that I bought to upgrade but even after changing the saddles I cant keep it intonated. Its literally driving me nuts. At this point I dont care if its a strat, lp, semi hollow or what. I just need something to stay playable and not spend the majority of my practice time tweaking/tuning, etc. Willing to spend upwards of around 800 bucks. I have had these guitars professionally set up and I also do my own set ups. I can play and want to get better but simply cant tolerate poor quality any longer. Ive seriously considered giving up on the instrument entirely but I still have a fainting sliver of hope there might be one electric out there that I can find to play.
#2
If you're going to be spending $800 on a guitar, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll be getting something far more stable than the cheap guitars you've had in the past.

We need more information than that to provide sensible recommendations. Read this:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1497696
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#4
My acoustics great. I just want the options an electric can offer. I fully understand an affinity isnt close to the quality of a mia strat. Is there a good option somewhere in the middle? People seem to love or hate mim strats, ive played them and I like them but I like to keep things simple. The more moving parts, the more potential hassles. What has a more proven track record for dependability, a tuneomatic or tele type bridge? My playing style is classic/60s rock/ blues. I really dont mean to sound like a nut or a pain in the ass but I just want a friggin tried and true workhorse of a guitar.
#5
Can't comment on the MIM Strats, but I had an MIM Telecaster for about 10 years and it was great - played it loads, gigged it loads, never had a single issue with it. When I finally sold it last year it was still going strong.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#6
Usually anything above 150 bucks with a properly cut nut and a solid bridge is stable enough for that. That is all you need for your requirements.

A 10 dollar precut graphite nut and a little work could do wonders for the guitars you already have.
Last edited by cheesefries at Jun 9, 2014,
#7
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're going to be spending $800 on a guitar, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll be getting something far more stable than the cheap guitars you've had in the past.

+1 to that.

Quote by finklestienkid
What has a more proven track record for dependability, a tuneomatic or tele type bridge? My playing style is classic/60s rock/ blues. I really dont mean to sound like a nut or a pain in the ass but I just want a friggin tried and true workhorse of a guitar.


We do need answers to the questions found in GaryBillington's link. But even without them, I can say this:

1) MIM Fenders and higher-end Epiphones are generally well enough made that you WILL see them used by professionals.

2) The Tribute series are to G&L as MIM Fenders are to Fender or those Epiphones are to Gibson...but better. They're made in Indonesia, but use most of the same parts- including the pickups- as G&L's USA models.

3) Godin guitars are all made in Canada, and they have pretty ferocious quality control. Very good guitars.

4) Reverend guitars are made in Korea, with final inspection at company HQ in Detroit. Good guitars with a lot of overall consistency. (I own 3, want more.)

5) Carvin guitars are made in San Diego, each individually customized for the buyer from a number of classic, basic designs. That means they can range from @$850 up to as much as you want to spend. You might not be able to afford a new one, but used ones are definitely worth looking at.

6) used guitars can be a real steal.
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#8
Quote by finklestienkid
In your opinion whats the most stable stock electric guitar for keeping intonation/tuning. Reason is I have had a run of inexpensive guitars and have had a nightmare of a time keeping them intonated.


Not even an inexpensive guitar will go out of intonation while you're playing. Tuning issues are generally the fault of the nut, and usually on a guitar that has a non-straight-pull headstock, such as an LP.

But in answer to your question...

I have two kinds of guitars that stay intonated and that stay in tune.
One -- anything with a Floyd will hold tune (and intonation) remarkably well.
Two -- I have Carvins with straight-pull headstocks that stay in tune (and intonation has never been an issue) nearly perfectly. These are neck-through guitars with locking tuners.