#1
Alright, so here's the deal. My input jack was making like, a jumping sound, and by that I mean the kind of sound that just sounds like a clap when the negative and positive terminals on the cable touch for a brief instant, when a sideways force would be pushed up against the cable. But the problem occurred when I tried to fix it. I opened up my guitar and re-soldered the negative and positive terminals and the wiring. Now, I had done this before with no problem at all, but this time, a constant buzz occurs that goes away when I touch the strings or anything connected to the ground. Keep in mind that no grounds were touched/modified other than the negative and positive returns, everything was placed back in its normal position.

Now, my concern is that perhaps my rosin-core electrical solder is the culprit, because I've encountered very similar problems when I attempted to fix another person's guitar, but I thought it was just the pickups. But this cannot be the pickups or a grounding loop/error because only the input jack's terminals were touched. Please help, I'm really concerned and I've been troubleshooting this for a couple weeks.
#2
Something I forgot to mention- the input jack is a closed tele-style input jack, so I have no access to either of the contact points, only the outside portion. If this gives you an idea, its a fender 1985 contemporary stratocaster with the input jack on the side, accessible from the back.
#3
If the buzz goes away when you touch metal it's a grounding issue. Try resoldering the connections again and make sure you didn't pull/break the other end of the wires that connect to the jack.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#4
Okay, sorry it took so long to respond, but I did re-check under the pickguard, and no, the ground cable is completely connected. My main question here is, I suppose, if solder can cause obscurities in grounding?
#5
Quote by ommie1111
Okay, sorry it took so long to respond, but I did re-check under the pickguard, and no, the ground cable is completely connected. My main question here is, I suppose, if solder can cause obscurities in grounding?


Not typically, unless there's a burr or bit if slag touching something it shouldn't. You tinned the wires first, right? You can always try touching them again, remelting the solder at the joints and letting them "re-settle" and see if that clears it up. It's possible, albeit unlikely, that a hairline break happened inside the housing. It's still making electrical contact but may be causing a grounding buzz. If that's the case, and it's the enclosed type, then it's time to order a new input assembly.
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#6
Doesn't sound like a solder problem, it sounds like a bad jack problem. Maybe something is cracked internally causing the problem. A new Switchcraft jack is about $1.50. Make certain you have the shielded ground to the sleeve and the hot wire to the pin.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
You know, I had thought about that. So much so that I decided to bypass the jack and just touched the hot and ground to the input cable, like wrapping them around the points on the cable. It was still happening, but I think its time to get a new input jack anyways.
#8
Further comment, it almost seems like the hot and the ground are touching or there's more voltage on the hot than the ground... odd right?
#9
Quote by StarGeezerTim
Not typically, unless there's a burr or bit if slag touching something it shouldn't. You tinned the wires first, right? You can always try touching them again, remelting the solder at the joints and letting them "re-settle" and see if that clears it up. It's possible, albeit unlikely, that a hairline break happened inside the housing. It's still making electrical contact but may be causing a grounding buzz. If that's the case, and it's the enclosed type, then it's time to order a new input assembly.


Yea I tinned the iron first. I think you guys are probably right on it being time for a new input assembly because its been happening with both guitars I have after soldering on, and I'm making a presumption that because my iron gets so hot that it burned through the separation area and they're touching now.
Last edited by ommie1111 at Jun 18, 2014,
#10
Okay so as it were, I got the new output jack Friday and wired it up without soldering. As it turned out, the new jack did NOT fix the problem. As it stands, I have a new observation- as I kinda pulled the hot wire to be more taut, the buzzing slightly went away, but if I was holding the wire, even just touching the surrounding cover of the wire, the buzzing would get worse. Does this mean I need to use newer and better wire for the job?