#1
Hi all,

I am setting my guitar up for C standard or drop Ab. That way if I tune up to C# or B the trem won't sink way too far. I am having trouble with the screws which were inserted at an angle. To get the trem to balance for C / C# I have to lower the screws past the cavity shield and now can't put it back on as the screws protrude and wont allow it. Basically it looks like I have to get new screws and use wood filler to seal the old holes then re-screw the unit.

Is this normal? I have had a few strats and two Floyds and they all had screws at an angle. it makes sense for the angel. Has anyone managed to set up a Floyd for B/C standard and not had the screws obstructing the cavity shield?

asdf
#2
To balance the lower string tension of lower tunings you should:
a) decrease the tension of the springs on the back of the guitar's body using the two screws that you see on the left on this picture:


b) use thicker strings.
#3
? I'm setting it up for C#

a) decrease the tension of the springs on the back of the guitar's body using the two screws that you see on the left on this picture:

maybe because I use older strings? I set it up fine then it goes out of tune.. tuning it up forces the bridge forwards
Last edited by 094568029434geo at Jun 14, 2014,
#4
Different strings = different tension, even if you use the same brand and thickness, old strings tension will differ from the new ones.
It does not matter if you're tunned to C#, Bb, E standard or what ever, the procedure is always the same. (Keeping in mind that when the lower the tuning the thicker strings you may need)
You can take it to a tech or...
Just use a damn phillips head screwdriver to adjust the two screws that hold the spring claw until the bridge is leveled with the body, tune the bugger, check if the bridge isn't to high or to low, if so, repeat until you succeed.
You'll save money and learn a new skill.
Last edited by tsc86 at Jun 14, 2014,
#5
Quote by tsc86
Just use a damn phillips head screwdriver to adjust the two screws that hold the spring claw until the bridge is leveled with the body, tune the bugger, check if the bridge isn't to high or to low, if so, repeat until you succeed.
You'll save money and learn a new skill.

Do this. Otherwise, you'll be spending money on a tech every time you replace the strings.


Also, I do recommend thicker strings.
#6
I have set up floyds before and not had this, but this was set up for E. I do it in C standard and its fine. 2 min later the strings drop two tones, then retuning brings the bridge forward. Should I move the fine tuners to neutral.
#7
Quote by 094568029434geo
I have set up floyds before and not had this, but this was set up for E. I do it in C standard and its fine. 2 min later the strings drop two tones, then retuning brings the bridge forward. Should I move the fine tuners to neutral.


I usually run them "out" a bit more than neutral, since I rarely have a string go sharp.
#8
Quote by 094568029434geo
I have set up floyds before and not had this, but this was set up for E. I do it in C standard and its fine. 2 min later the strings drop two tones, then retuning brings the bridge forward. Should I move the fine tuners to neutral.

Well, every FR is different. That said, I put the fine tuners at about 40-50%.

If your strings are dropping 2 tones, then you need to stretch them out though. Put your fretting hand on the 12th fret, then grab the string near the bridge and gently tug. Go to the 10 fret and repeat, then 8th fret, then 5th fret, etc. Do this for every string -- before you have locked down the nut! That way, you strings are nice and stretched before you even use the fine tuners.
#9
I've had to put the springs back on to stop the problem. So how can I get more flutter and action from this Jackson licenced Floyd? Can I buy springs that are different gauge? They all look the same?