#1
I just ordered the squier, with the intention of playing it through my blackstar HT40 tube amp... Im thinking it should be OK because its only one octave lower than standard tuning guitar, but Im wondering if anyone has any experience with this. I dont want the lower frequencies to mess up my tubes.
#2
If you are going to play bass through your blackstar you will have to keep it down around 1 or 2. It's fine for lower talky volumes. At band volumes not gonna happen.

It's not so much the tubes... The speaker is going to hate you for it.
Last edited by cheesefries at Jun 10, 2014,
#3
Gotcha. I think it will be Ok, be it that I mess with an octaver every now and then, and it seems to handle it just fine. I just play bass at home, so no need to get the amp up higher than a few notches anyway. Thanks
#4
Quote by pjs87
I just ordered the squier, with the intention of playing it through my blackstar HT40 tube amp... Im thinking it should be OK because its only one octave lower than standard tuning guitar, but Im wondering if anyone has any experience with this. I dont want the lower frequencies to mess up my tubes.


A standard bass is only one octave lower than a standard tuning guitar.

But a bass will ordinarily have thicker strings and a longer scale. Think of it this way -- those little spinet pianos (the short vertical ones that tuck up against a wall) compare to the Squier. They're still tuned the same as a standard grand piano, but the shorter string length means that the bottom end is far muddier (you can barely hear a distinction between the bottom half-dozen keys). The nine-foot grand would correspond to a standard 34" scale bass -- you can really hear the distinction in the bottom keys.

The lower frequencies won't affect your tubes. Most guitar tube amps are full-range where the electronics are concerned. It's the speakers that won't do what you need. Most guitar speakers drop off rapidly below about 100Hz (a standard low E is about 82Hz), and the actual bass fundamentals are well below what they can reproduce well.

Here's the issue, however. In order for a speaker to reproduce a note an octave down at the same volume, it needs to move about four times as much air. If a guitar speaker attempts that, it can "jump the track." Guitar speakers don't have enough Xmax to support that distance of movement. In short, you need to be careful that you don't accidentally hit a transient that will move the speaker cone too far.

Bear this in mind: the volume setting is immaterial. You can nail one of those transients with the amp volume set to 1 or 2.
#5
Quote by pjs87
Gotcha. I think it will be Ok, be it that I mess with an octaver every now and then, and it seems to handle it just fine. I just play bass at home, so no need to get the amp up higher than a few notches anyway. Thanks


I've run "home" bass through a low-powered tube amp (mine is 50W, and that's "low" compared to my 1500W solid state gigging amps), but I'm running it into a ported 2x12 cabinet with a pair of 200W Eminence speakers. I think it might be a bit scary to run it through something like an open-back combo <G>.

Some octavers actually produce the fundamental of the octave tone, some just reproduce the harmonics that *indicate* that tone to your ears. Depending on your octaver, you might not actually be feeding the amp the same notes that the guitar would.