#1
Im currently using a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe. got it a couple of months ago. use it for giggings 1-2 a month. when i practise alone at home i cant really crank up the volume to really push the tubes hard enough to the point i get the sound im going to using for my gigs/practice.

Ive read the solution is a volume mod. check the link below.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fender-Hot-Rod-Deville-Blues-Deville-Hot-Rod-Deluxe-TONE-LOW-VOLUME-MOD-/161305234124?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item258e8a8acc#ht_1891wt_1794

This mod adds a Grand MasterVolume to control the sensitivity of both channels' volume knobs which allows you to easily adjust your amp to low volume.

"The Blues Deville + Hot Rod Deluxe/Deville are notorious for their difficulty to dial into low volume tones. The new Grand Master Volume Pot lets you control the sensitivity of the factory installed volume knobs and therefore you can easily adjust the amp to any low volume level you desire. Grand Master Volume Pot to right of V1 (input preamp tube)"

Would this mod be a solution? Or there is a better solution?
#2
The link doesn't work and I'm guessing it's a pot that goes in the FX loop. If sensitivity of the input gain and master volume is a problem then that would help. Another solution is a volume pedal in the loop. Based on the loop specs a 10K - 25K pedal would be best. Do you know the impedance of the volume pot on eBay?
#3
Another solution is a volume pedal in the loop. Based on the loop specs a 10K - 25K pedal would be best. Do you know the impedance of the volume pot on eBay?


I have the same problem, and never tought of this. Genius! I'll be able to remove my ear plugs now
#4
Those eBay mods usually are just a volume pot between two female jacks. Obviously it’s not necessary if you already have a volume pedal, but if you don’t have one an $10 eBay attenuator isn’t a bad deal.
#5
Isn't that effectively just a master volume in a slightly different part of the circuit? Can be helpful if the amp's volume pot is a bit jumpy, but it's not letting you push the power amp tubes any more, either.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#6
The only advantage that would give is a log pot instead of the ludicrous linear volume pot on the HRD. It will make it easier to control the volume at lower settings but it will have no effect on anything else.
If it was me, I'd simply replace the pots in the amp. It's a design error, fix the error.

It's still going to sound the same, just the volume won't be so touchy down low.
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#7
Quote by Taz9
I have the same problem, and never tought of this. Genius! I'll be able to remove my ear plugs now
If you have a pedal after the volume pedal then you could use a standard higher impedance volume pedal. The FX return is 50K ohm, which will negatively affect the linear volume sweep of the pedal. But if the pedal goes into a high impedance input pedal (which all guitar pedals are) then the sweep will be fine.
#8
I love the sound of a HRD at about 4 on the volume. It's pretty loud though. Using the volume pedal or a volume pot in the pre-out/power-in does help to tame it some but the tone is not exactly the same because you are pushing the preamp tubes, not the power tubes and to a greater degree Fletcher-Munson curves. When playing quietly, turn up the bass to compensate for this and driving the amp with a tube screamer in front also gets you closer to live tone.

The volume pot characteristics never bothered me much. I just turned up the amp plenty and used the volume on my guitar to control volume and gain.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Quote by Cathbard
The only advantage that would give is a log pot instead of the ludicrous linear volume pot on the HRD. It will make it easier to control the volume at lower settings but it will have no effect on anything else.
If it was me, I'd simply replace the pots in the amp. It's a design error, fix the error.

It's still going to sound the same, just the volume won't be so touchy down low.


yeah i think that's why those things have taken off so much, the linear volume pot in the HRD
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
If you have a pedal after the volume pedal then you could use a standard higher impedance volume pedal. The FX return is 50K ohm, which will negatively affect the linear volume sweep of the pedal. But if the pedal goes into a high impedance input pedal (which all guitar pedals are) then the sweep will be fine.


Not sure I get it right
#11
It's a little had to explain. The impedance of the pot interacts with the impedance of the input that the pedal is connected with. If the input impedance is low (say 10K) and the volume pot is high (say 250K) then the sweep of the pedal will be off. In this example the level will be divided in half in the first 4% of the pedal movement (4% of 250K = 10K). For simplicity I'm using linear pots to demonstrate.

As a general rule in audio you want the output impedance to be much lower then the input impedance the output is connected with. For example in line level applications a 1K output likes a 10K or higher input.