#1
So I'm in a rock band and we are semi heavy. We're not metal, but a bit on the hard side of classic rock, let's say. Think Wolfmother, maybe.

However, we got asked to open for a pop singer/violin player. This person is very talented but she's not heavy at all... Think like... I'm like a bird by Nelly Furtado but with Violin.

Now they obviously heard our music because they asked us to perform... and they made us sign a contract and we're getting paid so obviously they're serious about this.

My question is should we soften our sound a bit? Cut back on the distorion or take out the heavier sounds?

Our band is a bit divided on this issue. On the one hand, they hired us in spite (or maybe because of) our sound so we should give them what they paid for. On the other hand, it's improbable that someone who paid to see Nelly Furtado would be happy to see Wolfmother opening for her...

What do you guys think?
#2
tough call. Ultimately it will have to be you and your band who decides, but I think if I was in the position I would see this as a great chance to change things up a bit. Not completely change your entire sound, but maybe throw in some songs that you wouldn't do, make it unique to the occasion
#3
Just "Be You". Do you play Nelly Furtato? if not, why play at a place where you have to question the audience's reception of your band. The main reason most of us do this IS FOR THE CROWD. Play to "your" audience, compromise is for suckers not willing to go the distance. I guarantee Maiden would play Maiden @ a Jimmy Buffett Concert
#5
I agree. Stay true to your music, but if in doubt ask the violinist you are opening for.
#6
I think this is definitely something to pay attention to. It's one of those subtle courtesies that sets apart a band that's easy to gig with from one that causes too much friction.

If you hammer through a set of heavy tunes, it's a safe bet that some or a good bit of the audience will be in the mood for that kind of music; especially if your set is short and leaves people wanting more. It can make people more resistant to a different sound unless they are already fans of the headliner.

There's nothing wrong with grabbing attention and keeping it, though. It's your band's style, so don't hide it. Just don't work people into a frenzy necessarily. You're opening for this band, so think like you were in their house and were embracing their customs or whatever.
#7
play your music they booked you how you are if you play something else theyll be confused as to what they bought

now you are opening so dont go and like shit talk about the main act or whatever but dont change your sound just because you think they crowd wont like it good music is good music
#8
I'd say basically be yourself, just write the setlist with a bit more focus on the less heavy tracks. I don't know how much material do you have to choose from, but if you have enough to make choices, then I guess this is the best path. I think this is also generally the best route for any band opening for anyone - be yourself, but with a bit of adjustment for the audience you're likely to play for.

If you don't have too much to choose from, though, then I'd say just do your usual thing. Nobody has to stay if they don't like your set, but this is what you're best at and you can give it your 100%.
#9
Quote by Smegal
I agree. Stay true to your music, but if in doubt ask the violinist you are opening for.


+1

It's not your show - it's the violinist's. If you are unsure ask her.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
DON'T CHANGE ANYTHING! Play what you play the way you play!

Changing the sound because of the crowd is how bands start getting commercial and loose their personality. I've seen this happen to two local bands, in a town where the music scene is almost dead.
If you change your sound for one show people who see the show will always think "that band plays this" when your band actually plays "that". Your image is extremely important, because it's based on it that people will hire you for shows.

Remember, when there's a band which doesn't fit the rest of the show it's not the band's fault, it's the show organizer's fault.
Last edited by mp8andrade at Jun 12, 2014,
#11
Jimi Hendrix opened for the Monkees, at one point. The band loved his music. The tweeners who came to the show, not so much. It didn't last.

It may be that while the violinist thinks your music is great, she might not be that in tune with what her audience will accept. Beyond that, I agree with Alan.
#12
You have to do your 'thing' in these situations. The customer is always right and once you've accepted the gig you have to go through with it. Just do the best you can as you would with any audience.

I always try to make sure people know what we play before accepting a booking but if they don't listen to our mp3's or check out our website then there's very little the band can do. We've played two weddings recently and we are really not a wedding band, but we went down well as the bride knew her friends (first dance was AC/DC) and any live band would have gone down well. we've had several bookings out of it as well, so job done!

I like being support, if you go down well everyone thinks you ae better than you really are and if the lead act goes down better then everyone is happy. No pressure so just have a blast and enjoy it.
#13
Also it's probably too late to mention this but even if you play heavy music doesn't mean that you need to turn your amps up stupidly loud.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
thanks for the advice everyone! We confirmed with the booker and they're not really worried so we're not either.

We'll have to cut a few songs out of our set to fit the length they asked anyways so we'll cut out the heavier ones.


We're still on the fence about this one though.

What do you guys think... too heavy?
http://differentdays.bandcamp.com/track/vanity
#15
Quote by flexiblemile

My question is should we soften our sound a bit? Cut back on the distorion or take out the heavier sounds?

Our band is a bit divided on this issue. On the one hand, they hired us in spite (or maybe because of) our sound so we should give them what they paid for. On the other hand, it's improbable that someone who paid to see Nelly Furtado would be happy to see Wolfmother opening for her...

What do you guys think?


No!!

I like thrash metal. I like Kate Bush. I hate everything inbetween. Don't be inbetween.