#1
e|--------------------0--------------------------------------------------------|
B|-----------5-------0--------------------------------------------------------|
G|-3--------4-------6--------------------------------------------------------|
D|-3--------3-------7---------------------------------------|
A|-2--------5-------7-----------------------------------------------|
E|-3----------------5----------------------------------------------------------|

I use these chords quite alot, it would be nice to know their names.
If anyone knows, i would be grateful if you would tell

I mostly don't play them as arpeggios.
Last edited by Rensa at Jun 13, 2014,
#2
The first chord is G B F A#. The intervals in the chord are root (G), major third (B), minor 7th (F) and augmented 9th (A#). It's a G7#9 chord.

The second chord is D F B E. The intervals in the chord are root (D), minor third (F), major 6th (B) and major 9th. It's a Dm6/9 chord.

The third chord is A E A C# B E. The intervals in the chord are root (A), major third (C#), perfect fifth (E) and major 9th (B). It's an Aadd9 chord.

But really, learn about chord construction and naming chords gets a lot easier and you don't need to ask these questions. It's not that hard. You just need to know the intervals and the note names.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Thanks Maggara, do you have any reccomendations on where it's best to learn?
I could google, but how to get the 6/9 and add chords is beyond me. I can deal with Major, Minor, 7th, 9th chords.
#4
Quote by Rensa
I could google, but how to get the 6/9 and add chords is beyond me


normal triad, add the 6th and add the 9th. instant 6/9 chord.


Maj 6/9
e-(3)--
b-3---
d-2---
g-2---
a-3---
e------

^the high G in brackets is the 5th which doesn't affect the chord's quality, so you can keep it or toss it. it becomes harder to play the 5th in this position for the minor 6/9 (see below)

minor 6/9
e-(3)--
b-3---
d-2---
g-1---
a-3---
e------
#9
OK, here's some info about chord construction. First you need to know the note names and the intervals.

Triads:
Triads are chords with three notes (root, third and fifth). There are four different kind of triads:

Major - root, major third, perfect fifth
Minor - root, minor third, perfect fifth
Augmented - root, major third, augmented fifth
Diminished - root, minor third, diminished fifth

When naming chords, triad is assumed major. So if the chord name is just C, it means C major. "m" in the chord name means a minor triad, for example Cm means C minor. "aug" or "+" means augmented and "dim" means diminished triad (for example Caug or C+ and Cdim).

7th chords:
The 7th in chords can be major, minor or diminished. When naming chords, the 7th is assumed minor. For example C7 means C major triad + minor 7th and Cm7 means C minor triad + minor 7th. "Maj7" means major 7th. For example Cmaj7 means C major triad + major 7th and Cmmaj7 means C minor triad + major 7th.

Diminished 7ths are only used in diminished 7th chords (diminished triad + diminished 7th). The chord symbol for diminished 7th chords is °7, for example C°7 means C diminished 7th chord. There are also half-diminished chords (diminished triad + minor 7th) and the symbol for them is ø7. For example Cø7 means C half-diminished chord. They are also sometimes called m7b5 chords.

Extended chords:
Extended chords are 7th chords with "extensions", ie 9th, 11th and 13th. So they all include a 7th plus extensions. When naming chords, the extensions are all assumed major. For example C9 means C major triad, minor 7th and major 9th.

11th chords also include a 9th in them, and 13th chords include both an 11th and a 9th in them. But usually when you play a 13th chord, you omit the 11th and the 9th. Also, an 11th chord doesn't need to include the 9th in the voicing.

Add chords:
Add chords don't have a 7th in them. There are add9, add11 and (add)6 chords (all major intervals). For example Cadd9 means C major triad + major 9th, Cmadd11 means C minor triad + major 11th, C6 means C major triad + major 6th and Cm6 means C minor triad + major 6th.

Suspended chords:
Suspended chords have a major second or a perfect fourth in them instead of a third. So they are neither major or minor. Sus2 = root + 2nd + fifth and sus4 = root + 4th + fifth.

This is pretty much all you need to know about chord construction and naming. Hope this helped a bit and wasn't too confusing.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jun 13, 2014,
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Excellent chord explanation.

If the extensions or added notes aren't major then you notate it with a sharp or flat sign in front of the 9, 11, or 13, like C#mb9. This seems kinda obvious, but sometimes little details like that can trip people up.

Hm, I just thought of something I've never thought of (or run into). What if you have like a dominant 7th chord with a flat extension? Would it have to be labeled as an add chord instead of an extended chord, like A7addb9? Otherwise the name would be Ab9 which should obviously be an Ab dominant 9th chord.

Maybe my first paragraph is wrong and sharps and flats are for add chords only?

Edit: Wait, no. it would be more like A7b9 wouldn't it? That sounds right to me, but I'll wait for someone to let me know if I'm right.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Jun 13, 2014,
#11
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The first chord is G B F A#. The intervals in the chord are root (G), major third (B), minor 7th (F) and augmented 9th (A#). It's a G7#9 chord.

The second chord is D F B E. The intervals in the chord are root (D), minor third (F), major 6th (B) and major 9th. It's a Dm6/9 chord.

The third chord is A E A C# B E. The intervals in the chord are root (A), major third (C#), perfect fifth (E) and major 9th (B). It's an Aadd9 chord.

But really, learn about chord construction and naming chords gets a lot easier and you don't need to ask these questions. It's not that hard. You just need to know the intervals and the note names.



god I love this board. So many people who can lay things out clearly and explain stuff better than loads and loads of other music based forums...
#12
Quote by The4thHorsemen
If the extensions or added notes aren't major then you notate it with a sharp or flat sign in front of the 9, 11, or 13, like C#mb9. This seems kinda obvious, but sometimes little details like that can trip people up.

Hm, I just thought of something I've never thought of (or run into). What if you have like a dominant 7th chord with a flat extension? Would it have to be labeled as an add chord instead of an extended chord, like A7addb9? Otherwise the name would be Ab9 which should obviously be an Ab dominant 9th chord.

Maybe my first paragraph is wrong and sharps and flats are for add chords only?

Edit: Wait, no. it would be more like A7b9 wouldn't it? That sounds right to me, but I'll wait for someone to let me know if I'm right.

Yeah it is A7b9.
#13
Here seems like a good place to ask a question I've been unsure of to ask google...

A D7 chord leads excellently to Gmaj, C7 leads wonderfully to Gmaj.

Do the sus2 or sus4 chords have a similar 'super power', or is it a case of it acting mostly like a 5th chord, neither major or minor
Last edited by flaaash at Jun 14, 2014,
#14
Quote by flaaash
A D7 chord leads excellently to Gmaj, C7 leads wonderfully to Gmaj.


This is because D7 is the dominant in the key of G, and C7 is the dominant of F (I'm going to guess you meant F instead of G at the end.

Quote by flaaash
Do the sus2 or sus4 chords have a similar 'super power', or is it a case of it acting mostly like a 5th chord, neither major or minor


Well in the key of G a Dsus2 will still lead well into G, as it is still based off the dominant tonic.

It's worth mentioning that a lot of the time 5th chords (and sus chords to some extent) are either major or minor - their tonality is implied through other instruments within the song.

These questions are pretty basic, perhaps it's time to learn some theory? If you don't you'll just have random trivia facts and you won't know what to do with them.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Quote by AlanHB
This is because D7 is the dominant in the key of G, and C7 is the dominant of F (I'm going to guess you meant F instead of G at the end.


Well in the key of G a Dsus2 will still lead well into G, as it is still based off the dominant tonic.

It's worth mentioning that a lot of the time 5th chords (and sus chords to some extent) are either major or minor - their tonality is implied through other instruments within the song.

These questions are pretty basic, perhaps it's time to learn some theory? If you don't you'll just have random trivia facts and you won't know what to do with them.



Thanks - yeah I meant F.

Looks like I'll have to brush up on theory. I've forgotten a lot.

Even though I'm mainly a soft rock and country type of musician.- I always get inspired to write jazz music when I stumble across good threads like this.
#16
HOLY CRAP, thanks everyone. Maggara that is a great overview of things, THANKS ALOT!
You guys rock!
#18
Quote by cdgraves
You could also call the 2nd one a G13, sans root.

If there's no root (no G), how exactly could it be called a G13? This idea always seemed rather silly to me. Let's remove the root, which is the tone that implies the chord name and then say it's "G13" or whatever.


Of course, if the bass plays a G. But assume the bass isn't playing a G.
#19
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
If there's no root (no G), how exactly could it be called a G13? This idea always seemed rather silly to me. Let's remove the root, which is the tone that implies the chord name and then say it's "G13" or whatever.


Of course, if the bass plays a G. But assume the bass isn't playing a G.

Because we don't know the context. If there are other instruments playing and any of them plays a G note, it could be G13. I think his point was that chords can have different names. And you can use the same fingerings for G13 too.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Because we don't know the context. If there are other instruments playing and any of them plays a G note, it could be G13. I think his point was that chords can have different names. And you can use the same fingerings for G13 too.

Well, yeah...I get that. I'm just saying, you have to define the context to be able to call it G13.


If I'm just playing (no other instruments, not even my voice) that chord on guitar, no way in hell it's G13. On the other hand, if I play that chord, and the bass plays a G note...then yes, it's G13. But people have too much of a tendency to just go, "This is G13". Well...yes, it can be.
But TS doesn't seem to have the theory knowledge to know that you need the context. In the right context, all chords can be named differently, really.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jun 17, 2014,
#21
Ok, I pretty much agree with crazysam regarding the second chord, but I do see some sense in cdgraves's point considering that the first chord is a G7#9. The second chord shape could conceivably be just a continuation of the first chord, depending on the rhythmic/dynamic context, in which case it would probably be a G13#9. Even both chords could maybe be considered a G13#9 together.

Then again, this is just a supposition that could very possibly not be true.

EDIT: Ugh, I re-read the OP and this isn't a progression. Never mind then.
Last edited by sickman411 at Jun 18, 2014,