#1
Went to Guitar Center yesterday to check out some guitars. I took the old starcaster with me to have them look at it and see if I could trade it in. Online I was looking at two used Epiphone les Paul's they had. One was a traditional pro and the other was a studio delux. The trad pro was a gold top and the studio was a silver burst.
Gave the guy at the guitar area my star caster and told him I couldn't get it to stay in tune. That every time I picked it up i had to tune it again. Well a bit later they came back and said the neck was bowed and that was why it would not stay in tune. So I ended up trading it in. Got like $55 out of it.
So then got to looking for something new. Had about $400 to spend and ended up going with the Epiphone studio delux mainly becasue I just loved the color and finish on it. And it literally looks like new there is not a single scratch on it anywhere.
I also got a gig bag and a few other odds and ends while I was there like some different picks a stand a cheap strap. Got home late so haven't had any time to play it yet
I'll try and get some pics of it up when I can. But I can say I am very happy with it
#2
Great, congrats! Looking forward to seeing the pics! HNGD!
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#4
well I'll have to do that then. didn't really know it was a requirement. sorry fellas I'll get some pics up
#6
Quote by metriccar
How would a neck become bowed?

Weather and use. Its not a critical issue though, it can be fixed in under 2 mins by a novice if you'd bothered to check into it.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#7
Quote by metriccar
How would a neck become bowed?

Changes in temperature and humidity and changes in string gauge.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#8
Quote by lucky1978
Weather and use. Its not a critical issue though, it can be fixed in under 2 mins by a novice if you'd bothered to check into it.



Not necessarily. Necks can be bowed in such a way that a truss rod has little or no chance of affecting anything. It then becomes a structural problem and often one that's not worth the time and effort to fix.

What bothers me, however, is why the tech would tell him that a bowed neck would cause his guitar to go out of tune often? I'm having trouble making sense of that.
#9
Quote by metriccar
How would a neck become bowed?


I've seen guitars that were left face-in, leaning into a corner, back-bowed to a point where they needed to be clamped to a flat surface and slowly brought back to straight. Guitars with necks made of wood that wasn't properly seasoned will sometimes take a set. I've seen guitars that were bowed inward in the 1-5 fret area, bowed backward in the 7-12 fret area, and that then had a ski jump in the 15-21 fret area.

Improper storage accounts for a lot. Guitars left most of their lives on stands have a higher proportion of neck issues than guitars hung on hangers, though guitars on hangers have more issues than guitars left in cases.
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 15, 2014,
#10
Quote by dspellman


What bothers me, however, is why the tech would tell him that a bowed neck would cause his guitar to go out of tune often? I'm having trouble making sense of that.


The guitar tech didn't tell me that was what was causing it to keep going out of tune. They told me that the neck was bowed. I just assumed that was the tuning problem.
#11
Quote by champ198
The guitar tech didn't tell me that was what was causing it to keep going out of tune. They told me that the neck was bowed. I just assumed that was the tuning problem.


Pick up "How to make your Electric Guitar Play Great" by Dan Erlewine. Maybe $20 at Amazon, and the best accessory you'll ever get for your guitar. Even if you never touch your guitar other than to string it and play it, you'll know what to look for and how to talk to your tech intelligently. Best case, you'll be able to fix whatever ails your guitar (setup-wise) on your own when you need to.