#1
Hi

I've been playing since about more then 5 years now and unless some very early very basic lessons i am completely self-taught.

I still can't afford a teacher but i can't get rid of the feeling almost desperately needing one.
Reason behind this is im struggling really hard to pick out exercises, songs and theory to learn that suit my needs and stick with them ( or stick with exercises way beyond usefulness in a lot of cases too) . I'm working with a book(from Peter Fisher) as my only demanding progressing routine (set to 1 hour a day) which aims a lot at my weaknesses (ear-training, chord-construction theory, etc.) but in fact i play a lot more a day, basically from noon to night time, sometimes more sometimes less and there the problems start.

I'm constantly looking for new information(including exercises, etudes etc) on tons of sites and overwhelming myself with the amount of stuff i want to be able to play (ever tried on working on up to 30 songs per day?) or understand. Also i find myself often trying to work on as many techniques as possible a day (around 15 or so?) but in the end i have(had?) to admit such amount is not possible to progress at once (cant even remember all the names of the songs i'm trying to learn).

i tried creating a practice routine for my needs , but writing down what technique (or theory, etc) to practice for a set amount of time still doesnt tell me which exercise would fit in at what point.

suggestions what i could do myself until i can afford a teacher again?
i am one of those who has the goal to reach virtuoso level of playing.

sidenote:
(still in debt, working on it since 1,5 years, im reaching critical points to get rid of my debt and after im certain to look for a competent teacher again )
#2
though I am thrilled with your intent and hard work... best thing I'd tell you is to... s-l-o-w down! you're not gonna' learn it all in a day, or a week, or a month, or a year...or heck, in ten years plus. it's a 'constant' learning progress, a little at a time. in fact, from what i can get from reading your post is that you're pushing SO HARD you've taken the 'fun' out of playing altogether! g'ah! and man... without the fun, it don't mean nothing.

you can self-teach yourself a lot, i'm completely self-taught myself and I know plenty of others, so that's no problem. but PACE yourself. even if you get a good teacher, you'll still need to pace yourself, keep it real and keep it FUN.

and good luck to you, amigo.
#3
I agree with beowolff just from reading your post I can see that you're rushing things. Do not rush learning it takes time for your brain to process information stuffing yourself with a whole bunch of technique, and theory that you can't even use properly wont help you get better. Also another thing is a lot of people tend to forget that learning guitar is a never ending journey! Trust me it's not a race what's the point of learning all these techniques if you can't even use most of them correctly?


Slow down dude take your time I can see that you're new to learning how to practice efficiently just remember it's quality of quantity when developing a practice schedule.. As you get better at practicing, and understand the concept of quality practice then you can add more things to your schedule, but for now just slow down it's a trial, and error process especially when you are self taught you're just not going to figure out how to practice perfectly in one day it takes a lot of error to figure it out man..

I can lay down some tips below for you!

1. Set goals

2. Decide what to practice- if you don't know the reason you're practicing something then don't do it!


3. Use a timer- This is very important you need to learn how to time your exercises!
Sometimes my exercises can last 2 short minutes because I know that's how long I can focus, and play at my absolute best when challenging my self with a difficult exercise so I won't make that many mistakes.. Other times I'll set an exercise longer because i'm building endurance Funk guitar is a good example of this.


4. Practice makes permanent- This is super important! When practicing a technique take it to a slow BPM that you know you can do perfectly with a metronome all technical ability is really is muscle memory so practice things slowly, and then when you feel comfortable enough with the set BPM set it up 5 more BPM, and then keep repeating this processes over, and over again!


5. Always start off slowly- This is also very important don't let your ego get ahead of you while practicing take things slowly warm up, and remember to work on a new technique you're learning slowly..


6. Observe your mistakes- This is a very critical part in developing your guitar playing skills you must watch every movement your hand makes! Am I picking the right way? Am I strumming the right way? Is this song i'm playing out of time? Brutal honesty will help you develop much quicker than a player who thinks everything they're doing is flawless.

That's all the tips I have for now.

Last edited by Black_devils at Jun 16, 2014,
#4
Quote by gh0ul666

suggestions what i could do myself until i can afford a teacher again?


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#5
Relax and have fun. Playing guitar needs to be fun or it'll become as chore.

The 'time' you practice in a way isn't important. It's mostly about the quality of time you spend tapping and strumming away. You may spend 6 hours a day playing, while 2 of those are quality minutes. The rest was fluff and bubble stuff.

Amateurs Practice Until They Get It Right; Professionals Practice Until They Can’t Get It Wrong.
#6
I struggle with the same thing. I want to learn everything all at once. The best thing I have found is somewhat of a compromise. I will pick one or two exercises or songs that I want to learn for the week. I will add those to my routine or prioritize those in my practice. After a week or two, I will go back and see if they are important enough to me to keep learning. If so carry on, if not I'll investigate something else. It's worked for my but YMV.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
- Steve Martin
#7
thanks for all your answers there definitely some useful advice in there, for now im just trying to lay back and prioritize few "my heart wants definitely this-things" and try to avoid overloading with mega-huge-information-packages and have set my workbook as priority and include anything else just as extras/bonuses (except for songs which i lowered to a maximum of 2-3 at once and working on them properly instead of rushing through all of them at once)
#8
Quote by gh0ul666
thanks for all your answers there definitely some useful advice in there, for now im just trying to lay back and prioritize few "my heart wants definitely this-things" and try to avoid overloading with mega-huge-information-packages and have set my workbook as priority and include anything else just as extras/bonuses (except for songs which i lowered to a maximum of 2-3 at once and working on them properly instead of rushing through all of them at once)


check out guitarhabit.com great free lessons there. Also watch my site, I'm working on free lessons that I will release soon.