#1
Hey all,

I have been playing guitar for roughly 3 years now but for about the past two years I have been what i call "stagnating". By this I mean: I have learnt all the basic open chords and lots of the more advanced chords (e.g. 7ths, barre chords etc) but since learning those after about 1 year of playing I haven't really improved over the last two years.

So, I wanted to ask some of the more experienced players where I would go from there? What should I learn next? I have started learning the blues scale as I want to be able to have a good knowledge of scales, is this a good place to start? What else should i be learning next after basic chords?

Any help greatly appreciated!!!

thanks!
#3
Hey Funkprint, welcome! Unfortunately, I'm just getting back into playing after many years absence (and even then, never reached even an intermediate level of proficiency) so I'm not sure I can provide much insight.

I can, however, perhaps point you in a direction where folks might be able to speak to your current state of aridity. I would think the "Musician Talk" forum (under Music) or "Guitar Techniques" (under Instruments) right here at Ultimate Guitar might render far more fruitful results from folks who have far more experience than I.

In extremely general terms, I can pass along some advice I recently heard a rather gifted teacher provide: keep a clear distinction between practice and playing. Practice is what you do to learn and perfect your technique. Playing is what you do with the material you already know. When you sit down to practice, then practice. When you go to play, play. If you practice when you should be playing, you get frustrated with what you can't do yet. If you play when you should be practicing, you get bored with what you are already proficient in. So if you're going to work scales or arpeggios or some other aspect you're unclear on, then block out that time and just do that. Likewise, if you just feel like jamming and riffing, then go ahead and do that.

Hope that helps, friend! Stick with it, and I'm sure you'll eventually get over this current bump in the road. Best regards!
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#4
Quote by StarGeezerTim
Hey Funkprint, welcome! Unfortunately, I'm just getting back into playing after many years absence (and even then, never reached even an intermediate level of proficiency) so I'm not sure I can provide much insight.

I can, however, perhaps point you in a direction where folks might be able to speak to your current state of aridity. I would think the "Musician Talk" forum (under Music) or "Guitar Techniques" (under Instruments) right here at Ultimate Guitar might render far more fruitful results from folks who have far more experience than I.

In extremely general terms, I can pass along some advice I recently heard a rather gifted teacher provide: keep a clear distinction between practice and playing. Practice is what you do to learn and perfect your technique. Playing is what you do with the material you already know. When you sit down to practice, then practice. When you go to play, play. If you practice when you should be playing, you get frustrated with what you can't do yet. If you play when you should be practicing, you get bored with what you are already proficient in. So if you're going to work scales or arpeggios or some other aspect you're unclear on, then block out that time and just do that. Likewise, if you just feel like jamming and riffing, then go ahead and do that.

Hope that helps, friend! Stick with it, and I'm sure you'll eventually get over this current bump in the road. Best regards!


thanks for the advice, the tip about keeping practising and playing separate is a great idea as i tend to just focus on scales to try and get the technique perfect but then i go a bit mad repressing the same scale for an hour which then puts me off playing for the day,

thanks!
#5
Hi friends, i am new into music,i initially start with piano playing and later develop intress into guiter, i can play just but few chords(G,C,D,Em, and Am). So pls i want u guys to help me out on where to start thou i have mind personal guiter but transpossing have been confusing, y is because not knowing where to starts pls help
#6
There's a an electric guitar subsection where you can ask these questions.
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#7
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#8
hey Funkprint

it's not unusual to get in a bit of a funk. the common advice is to start listening to new styles of music and learning the new songs you hear. that extra bit of perspective can transform how you play. guitarists often recommend jazz standards but to be truthful i don't think it matters what you start learning, so long as it's totally new to you.

i would also recommend getting more invested in music theory. we have a great subforum here called Musician's Talk dedicated to music theory, composition, and band leading. they can give you a sense of direction if you don't know where to start.

you can jump straight there with this link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=8

about 4 years ago now i made a post with links to music theory resources. i dug it up and here it is: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1395462

welcome to the forums
i don't know why i feel so dry
#9
Quote by Eastwinn
it's not unusual to get in a bit of a funk. the common advice is to start listening to new styles of music and learning the new songs you hear. that extra bit of perspective can transform how you play. guitarists often recommend jazz standards but to be truthful i don't think it matters what you start learning, so long as it's totally new to you.


I already have a pretty broad and eclectic taste in music, which helps. But I've been purposely "getting outside my comfort zone" recently by listening to stuff I don't ordinarily listen to. I may not necessarily become a fan of the new music, but as I develop my ear, I can pick up influence and phrasing from other genres. And it's definitely helped to keep things from getting stale.

Quote by Eastwinn
i would also recommend getting more invested in music theory. we have a great subforum here called Musician's Talk dedicated to music theory, composition, and band leading. they can give you a sense of direction if you don't know where to start.


I see that theory will increasingly become a necessity, even for someone who is primarily a "bedroom" player. Whether it's understanding chord patterns, scales, etc., having at least a passing understanding seems to be unavoidable.
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp