#1
in your view...i've tried resolutions in 16 bit 44khz all the way up to 96,but anytime i convert to 24/176 it's sounds the most crisp
#2
It's a placebo effect. The sampling frequency only really affects the top reproducible frequency (it's half the samplerate). Since the top of human hearing is ~20kHz, anything above 40k is a moot point. Now in reality it does start to drop a little before half which is why 44.1kHz and 48kHz are common but past that isn't really that big a deal.

16bit vs 24bit is what matters though. You have more headroom between the noise floor and clipping point with 24 bits.
#3
Quote by chatterbox272
Now in reality it does start to drop a little before half which is why 44.1kHz and 48kHz are common but past that isn't really that big a deal.
Drop a little?
Sampling an X frequency at a sampling frequency lower than X/2 generates distortion at an X/2 - X frequency.

People say converters have brickwall filters slightly above 20kHz so that isn't a problem, but I've never read that anywhere other than on not-that-reputable forums so I'd look out for more information about that if I was you.

A higher sampling frequency gives you a more detailed higher frequency material, but you'll not likely end up distributing the vast majority of your audio via 256kbps VBR AAC and 16bit/44.1kHz PCM, and people will not likely mind bits of distortion or lack of clarity.
If you wanna do something very nice you can always record stuff at 88.2kHz or 176.4kHz to get rid of all the distortion and record everything clearly, then downscaling the stuff at 44.1kHz dithering it so you keep most of the high end clarity.

As for the 16 vs 24 bit, that the resolution of the sampled signal.
24 bit means more headroom, but since people don't care shit about headroom you may as well say 24bits gives you a lower noise floor.

Edit: wait I read the thing again.
If you convert stuff from 44.1kHz to whatever other higher sampling requency, you're not getting stuff at the higher sampling frequency, you're getting audio sampled at 44.1kHz in a whatever resolution container.
If the higher frequency is a multiple of the lower frequency and the converter's smart, the result sounds exactly as the starting point, while if the higher resolution is not a multiple and/or your converter's stupid, you get jitter, which is a distortion.
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