#1
I play in a metal band that frequently uses harmonized guitar leads over bass lines. Aside from adding another rhythm guitar into the mix, what techniques can be used to make the leads sound more full?

Would adding more mids to the leads and bass take care of this?
#2
Quote by guitarmageddon0
I play in a metal band that frequently uses harmonized guitar leads over bass lines.
Now. what does that mean?
Two guitars play harmonies over a bassline, while other guitars play a rhythm part?
A guitar plays a lead while a bassline is played?
Explain yourself.

To make stuff sound more full you usually double track it, compress it, add lows, low-mids, and most importantly you raise the volume.

An example of what you're obtaining and one of what you wanna obtain would greatly help.
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#3
Depends on what kind of fullness you want. You should try different stuff and see what works best.

-Parallel compression can bring more punch to the guitars (and to almost any other instrument);
-Double tracking makes the guitars less dull, but I wouldn't double track depending on the guitar lines;
-When I do harmonized leads, I'll almost always pan then. Most of the times it's a hard pan, one track 100% left, another one 100% right, and if there's a third one it stays in the center (never worked with four harmonized tracks). Sometimes I want the leads to be more "glued", then I'll pan something like 60% and compress the tracks a little bit (some reverb may be nice too);
-You could try adding a effect like a chorus or a flanger or maybe a phaser? It may work;
-You can give the bass some more bass or give it to the rhythm guitar. If you're using chugs for the rhythm, giving the guitars a little boost at around 100hz can give you really nice results, as so removing a little bit around 220hz can give it a little bit more clarity, it all depends on your gear, though. But I usually prefer to add a drum kick following the chug and boosting it at around 80hz.
Last edited by mp8andrade at Jun 20, 2014,
#4
Quote by Spambot_2
Now. what does that mean?
Two guitars play harmonies over a bassline, while other guitars play a rhythm part?
A guitar plays a lead while a bassline is played?
Explain yourself.

Dude, chill. It seems super clear to me that it's two guitars harmonizing on a lead over the bass with no rhythm guitar at that particular moment as it's busy harmonizing with the lead.

Honestly, I'd approach this from an instrumentation standpoint and add a keyboard to fill in some empty spaces. Just a simple synth pad should add texture without being distracting.

Also bi-amp (virtually is fine) the bass with a lower-end clean track and a mid-high gritty dirt track, that will fill out the sound nicely as well.
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