#1
Warning: This post is kinda long

Alright, I've been playing guitar for 1.5 years exactly and I've judged myself capable enough to be worthy of an electric guitar. So tomorrow I'm getting my first electric for my birthday. Now as I spent my money on the guitar, I have two options.

Now I can't play my electric guitar without an amplifier, so I have two options. I can buy a decent amp like a Peavey, Roland Cube or Orange 15W amp. Or I can get a multi-effects processor. Apparently I can connect the processor to speakers or a headphone and play my guitar.

Now I can't spend much money on either the amplifier or the processor. I just want to practice my guitar in my room and maybe once in a while jam with my friends. I don't need either for a huge concert or anything.

I only have enough cash to buy a 15 W amp (which should be more than enough for my needs) or a cheap multi-effects processor such as a Zoom 505. My parents told me they'll get me good gear next year after my exams are done, so I have to deal with this. I like guitar effects. I wanna test out effects like distortion, flanger, overdrive etc. I can do either with a processor or a Peavey Vyper Amp.

Can I directly connect my processor do a pair of headphones (with an adapter) and play my guitar? Should I? Or should I just get an amp with built in effects? I can't get both because I'm from a third-world country and shit is seriously over-priced over here .
#2
If I were in your situation, I would probably go for the processor, but get a modeling one like a line 6 POD. They are pretty useful for recording and should have the headphone options. I would save up for the amp and actually buy something decent when the time comes. The amp is just as important as the guitar (maybe more) in getting proper tone so don't skimp.
#3
Quote by Fastmerc
If I were in your situation, I would probably go for the processor, but get a modeling one like a line 6 POD. They are pretty useful for recording and should have the headphone options. I would save up for the amp and actually buy something decent when the time comes. The amp is just as important as the guitar (maybe more) in getting proper tone so don't skimp.

This, but I'd recommend the Zoom G3/G5 as an alternative option to the POD.
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#4
If you want to jam with friends I think you need an amp. (I'm not too well up on the more technological stuff so there may well be some solution I'm not aware of.)

Oh and I judged myself capable of an electric guitar when I'd been playing for 0 years.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#5
This is a cross-post from another thread, but it seems applicable here as well:

We're at a point now with technology where an amp (as we know it) probably isn't necessary at all. Over the past week, I've plugged my guitar into, variously, my iPhone, my Korg PX-5D, a Pod HD (all three with headphones) and from there into a pair of KRK Rokit 8 studio monitors, into a 1500W power amp feeding a pair of fEARless F115s, and into a large PA array and mixer.

The Korg, for example, provides amp, cabinet and FX models. In addition, it includes a tuner, a metronome, a bass line generator, a drum kit plus rhythm tracks, a phrase trainer (takes a piece of a song from an MP3 and plays it over and over again so that I can learn it), a slower-downer (slows down the speed of a song without affecting the pitch), a pitch changer (leaves the speed of the song as is, but changes the pitch if I need to learn the song in a different key) and more. When run into a laptop via a USB cable, you can record (software is provided) and hear yourself back or play along with your own backing. As a practice device, it's far more useful than an amp. The whole thing will run off AA batteries (or a small AC wart), and it's easily able to fit into your pocket.

I have an Axe-FX Ultra and several Line 6 Pods, and honestly, I use a Pod HD (the bean version) these days more than anything. It's relatively inexpensive, small, portable, but it can hold its own with the best tone-generating gizmos on the planet. There are foot pedal choices out there if you get to a point where you need them, but it will also fit into some gig bag pockets so that you can minimize what you have to cart around to do professional-quality work.
#6
^ Will those things work for jamming with friends, though? I agree with you for only practising.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Can't say for sure this would go for all the options dspellman mentioned (although I can't see why it wouldn't), but I know with my Zoom G3 I can plug it straight into PAs, powered monitors etc... or basically anything with an aux input, so things like home stereos as well.

I've used it through a monitor at band practice, it got the job done.

Not sure it would project the sound for a gig in the same way a tube amp would though, so you'd possibly need to consider solid state levels of wattage?

I'd never be without my amps, but there's definitely the potential there to not have one until you can afford the right one.
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#8
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ Will those things work for jamming with friends, though? I agree with you for only practising.


Good point.

Friend of mine likes to get together around beers and burgers -- one guy brings a drum kit, he's got a guitar with a Pod, a medium-size mixer and a single QSC K12 (powered PA-type speaker with a 12" and a tweeter), and there's a Casio something-or-other 88-key keyboard, some mikes. I bring a Pod, plug into the mixer. The bass guy has a small bass amp. That's it. The K12 is loud enough to overcome the drum kit, and that's about all you really need.
#9
In your post you said "Or I can get a multi-effects processor. Apparently I can connect the processor to speakers or a headphone and play my guitar." This is not entirely correct. You will be able to use headphones, but you can not hook up an effects processor to a speaker without an amplifier. You need an amp of some sort to make sound. Now this comes in many forms. You could use a combo guitar amp, a guitar amp head + a speaker, a power amp and a speaker, or a self powered speaker monitor. All of these will work with an effects processor, but processor and speaker alone won't get you there.
Last edited by Starcounter1 at Jun 20, 2014,
#10
I have a pretty shitty speaker system in my bedroom. One of those cheap $70 ones that I just plugged in to play my X-box.
#11
Quote by GaryBillington


Not sure it would project the sound for a gig in the same way a tube amp would though, so you'd possibly need to consider solid state levels of wattage?


I'm not sure that *just* a tube amp is enough for a lot of gigs. Sitting on the floor, they'll usually lose most of their treble to the first ten rows of audience legs. Worse, you'll develop acoustic coupling that'll give you muddy, booming bottom end. On a stand or a road case is better, and up on a stage better yet, but you still don't get much dispersion to the back of the room. Hence, the whole business of miking an amp and broadcasting through a PA system that's distributing sound over the crowd all the way to the back.

But you get the same thing running directly into the PA through a modeler. All you need is some kind of monitor to let you and your bandmates know what you're playing.
#12
If your speakers have an auxiliary 3.5 mm jack for an input then you may be able to run a 3.5 mm cable from the processor headphone jack to the input on the speakers. It wouldn't sound great though. Otherwise I'm not sure how you would hook them up or if it is possible.
#13
Quote by dspellman
I'm not sure that *just* a tube amp is enough for a lot of gigs. Sitting on the floor, they'll usually lose most of their treble to the first ten rows of audience legs. Worse, you'll develop acoustic coupling that'll give you muddy, booming bottom end. On a stand or a road case is better, and up on a stage better yet, but you still don't get much dispersion to the back of the room. Hence, the whole business of miking an amp and broadcasting through a PA system that's distributing sound over the crowd all the way to the back.

But you get the same thing running directly into the PA through a modeler. All you need is some kind of monitor to let you and your bandmates know what you're playing.

20 years of gigging experience tells me a 30ish watt tube amp is more than enough for most normal pub gigs that a local band would play. Don't know how that translates internationally, but here in the UK most bands just play in local bars which don't have their own PA for you to hook up to - 90+% of the time you're relying on your amp alone.

Obviously if you get the opportunity to move up to larger venues you'll be mic'd up through a house PA system and then maybe you could just plug your modelling unit in direct, but the majority of local bands only play those on an occasional basis.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Jun 20, 2014,
#14
Well, now I'm confused now. Isn't a 15 W Peavey Vyper or Roland Cube amp going to be enough for my needs? I won't get a tone that will make Gilmour cry and won't have enough effects to form my own shoegaze band but it should be enough for practicing in my room and occasionally playing along with my pianist friend. And if I want to jam along with my band, then there will already be Marshall amps at the Jamming Pad which I can connect to my guitar which is good as well as I'll mainly be using overdrive only while jamming.
#15
Quote by Aichuuk
Well, now I'm confused now. Isn't a 15 W Peavey Vyper or Roland Cube amp going to be enough for my needs? I won't get a tone that will make Gilmour cry and won't have enough effects to form my own shoegaze band but it should be enough for practicing in my room and occasionally playing along with my pianist friend. And if I want to jam along with my band, then there will already be Marshall amps at the Jamming Pad which I can connect to my guitar which is good as well as I'll mainly be using overdrive only while jamming.

Plenty for practicing at home, and plenty for playing with your pianist friend.

As soon as you're playing with a band however (assuming there's a drummer involved) you need a real amp. The larger Vypyr Tube could be an option?
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#16
Cant really go wrong with a Peavy Vyper. Sounds decent enough at low volume, sounds decent enough at jam volume. It has most of the effects you can get from a POD etc.

You could always try the likes of the Vox VT series but from what ive heard of them they handle distortion poorly.

I believe they go for around £90-£110 nowadays.
#17
Quote by Aichuuk
Warning: This post is kinda long

Alright, I've been playing guitar for 1.5 years exactly and I've judged myself capable enough to be worthy of an electric guitar. So tomorrow I'm getting my first electric for my birthday. Now as I spent my money on the guitar, I have two options.

Now I can't play my electric guitar without an amplifier, so I have two options. I can buy a decent amp like a Peavey, Roland Cube or Orange 15W amp. Or I can get a multi-effects processor. Apparently I can connect the processor to speakers or a headphone and play my guitar.

Now I can't spend much money on either the amplifier or the processor. I just want to practice my guitar in my room and maybe once in a while jam with my friends. I don't need either for a huge concert or anything.

I only have enough cash to buy a 15 W amp (which should be more than enough for my needs) or a cheap multi-effects processor such as a Zoom 505. My parents told me they'll get me good gear next year after my exams are done, so I have to deal with this. I like guitar effects. I wanna test out effects like distortion, flanger, overdrive etc. I can do either with a processor or a Peavey Vyper Amp.

Can I directly connect my processor do a pair of headphones (with an adapter) and play my guitar? Should I? Or should I just get an amp with built in effects? I can't get both because I'm from a third-world country and shit is seriously over-priced over here .


If you are into effects then a processor could do the job. However this is about sound and the worlds effects would not make you sound much better. Effects ads to sound but your skills are what matters. If you are to much into effects on sounds then you will have trouble playing without. When you plug straight into a good tube amp then you will notice how you sound!

It takes experience but I can tell you that few effects go well with an amp.

I would suggest going to look for a used tube amp with the cash you got. One that sounds good to your ears and guitar. One you can grow with and should your jamming friends play drums you are loud enough.
#18
Alright great. Tomorrow I'll look in the Vyper amps. What would you say about Roland Cube 15x or the 12 watt Orange amps?
#19
Quote by Aichuuk
Alright great. Tomorrow I'll look in the Vyper amps. What would you say about Roland Cube 15x or the 12 watt Orange amps?

If you're playing with a band, the Roland 15x is a definite no.

What 12 watt orange amp are you talking about? If it's one of their solid state practice amps, no. If you're talking about one of their lunchbox style tube heads, that could be an option, but I suspect that is not the case given the other options you're considering.

Seriously, small practice amps and playing with bands do not work.
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#20
Quote by Aichuuk
Alright great. Tomorrow I'll look in the Vyper amps. What would you say about Roland Cube 15x or the 12 watt Orange amps?


Roland Cubes are great but I have a personal dislike for most Orange amps. Peavy is your best bet.

Give everything in your price range a try tho.
#22
Keep an eye out for modeling software as well. There are really 2 themes going on here.

1. Jamming with others - most of the time this takes an amp however with modern times. . . .

2. Modeling software / hardware - this seems to be becoming a viable option, especially when starting out or a practice heavy setup and sometimes it is INSANELY CHEAP! For instance Musicians Friend had Peavey ReValver Modeling software for $30 last week. I didn't need it but for $30 I bought it (and then $40 for a USB instrument cable - doh - but the one that comes with Rocksmith works really well if you already have it). This software sounds really great, especially for mainly practicing. You have to get a little creative hooking the modeling software / hardware up to external speakers in a jam situation (line out into a mixer, stereo, or powered speaker) but if you can get a great deal, go for it and use it to figure out what kind of amp and effects you want / need.

If I was starting over again I would have gotten a really good modeler software / hardware on day 1. Amps get freaking expensive when chasing tone.
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Amps:
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#23
I would try and get a roland cube 40xl.it has quite a few effects built in.its more than loud enough.ive got the zoom 505 and whilst the effects are pretty good most of them I dont use and I didnt really like the amp modelling features but the amp modelling features on the cube are excellent.

I only paid £100 for the amp as it was second hand.go to youtube and check numerous videos about the amps your intrested in as it will help make your decision.


I hope you find my advice helpful as I dont usually give advice.
#24
Quote by GaryBillington
Can't say for sure this would go for all the options dspellman mentioned (although I can't see why it wouldn't), but I know with my Zoom G3 I can plug it straight into PAs, powered monitors etc... or basically anything with an aux input, so things like home stereos as well.

I've used it through a monitor at band practice, it got the job done.

Not sure it would project the sound for a gig in the same way a tube amp would though, so you'd possibly need to consider solid state levels of wattage?

I'd never be without my amps, but there's definitely the potential there to not have one until you can afford the right one.


Yeah. I mean for just jamming i doubt it matters all that much. Just as long as you can get loud enough. It'd be worth checking those mates have a stereo or whatever.

Quote by dspellman
Good point.

Friend of mine likes to get together around beers and burgers -- one guy brings a drum kit, he's got a guitar with a Pod, a medium-size mixer and a single QSC K12 (powered PA-type speaker with a 12" and a tweeter), and there's a Casio something-or-other 88-key keyboard, some mikes. I bring a Pod, plug into the mixer. The bass guy has a small bass amp. That's it. The K12 is loud enough to overcome the drum kit, and that's about all you really need.


Again, like I said to Gary, it'd be worth checking the mates have that type of stuff. If they do, that'd be great.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Quote by Aichuuk

Then no. As a practice amp, the Roland would be better.

As an amp for playing with your band, neither would work.

Read this:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=31052894&postcount=2

Then start a dedicated "What Amp?" thread over in GG&A.
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#26
My advice is to not buy things urgently. The Vypr will not disappoint and I doubt you'll need many effects when practicing or jamming with friends.