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#1
My friend went on and on about how godlike vintage guitars and amps (especially amps) are. I'm wondering why. Its only logical that a modern guitar would be in better condition than a vintage one, right? Not to mention all the new features and such. This seems to be more obvious with amps. Wouldn't vintage amps have a lot less features? Of course, if they have better sound quality or something, that would be more important to me, but it seems logical that with improved technology and other advancements would make modern instruments superior.

Please explain to me why vintage products are so much better. Thanks.
#2
Because, they were made with better materials, better craftsmanship, and with the intent to make something better than the competition. Now days its who can make the cheapest decent playing guitar/amp and charge the most for it without loosing customers. So they skimp on materials and quality craftsmanship to make up cost. There's not much pride in what people are putting out unless it's like a Fender Custom shop or PRS, etc.

Back in the day, the people making the equipment took more pride in their work, as well as the companies making them.
#3
I just noticed you're an adbot, so **** you, but I'm answering this anyway because it's a decent question.

  • The number of vintage instruments from one year can only decrease. This creates guaranteed exclusivity.
  • Some of the techniques and materials used to make guitars back in the 50s and 60s are not used any more, or are not available, or are rarely used. This creates the perception, real or otherwise, that there is some "vintage magic" that cannot be replicated by modern means.
  • Having an old instrument can be seen as a sort of cultural artifact, in the way that having an original painting from the 1800s might be. Even if you can't tell the difference from a modern replica, some people find sentimental or cultural value in a historic (or at least old) instrument.
  • New features are not generally of high value to musicians. Instruments are often expected to act, look, and sound exactly like the last generation of instruments, so the "originals" or "first generation" instruments of a genre are often perceived as being desirable despite advances in technology or engineering.
  • Changes in technology are not always improvements in sound. If the sound of a 57 Strat through a 59 Bassman is perceived as a "holy grail" vintage tone, any modern attempts to replicate it will be measured against it. Even if the modern replication is very good, there are some people who feel that having that original gear represents perfection that has only been copied and never reproduced.
  • It's cool to have old stuff.
  • Baby boomers love to have the stuff that was new when they were a kid and Jimi was playing Woodstock. This drives prices up which adds to the cultural fascination and creates a feedback loop of "expensive = rare = good" that may or may not reflect reality.
  • Sometimes vintage stuff really does sound totally, unbelievably awesome.


So, there's no definitive answer to the question. Obviously we can't say that vintage gear is always better, or worse, or overvalued, or totally jaw-droppingly inimitable, or complete hype-driven delusion. Certainly all of those adjectives apply to some vintage gear, but as with anything it's case-by-case, subjective, and complicated.

There's no good answer, but there's certainly something special about some old gear and there's certainly some completely silly mythology as well.

Gear is fun, try as much of it as you can and try not to get mad about other people's thoughts on it.
#4
Quote by ethan_hanus
Because, they were made with better materials, better craftsmanship, and with the intent to make something better than the competition. Now days its who can make the cheapest decent playing guitar/amp and charge the most for it without loosing customers. So they skimp on materials and quality craftsmanship to make up cost. There's not much pride in what people are putting out unless it's like a Fender Custom shop or PRS, etc.

Back in the day, the people making the equipment took more pride in their work, as well as the companies making them.


If that were true, it would be an awesome reason.

Since it's bullshit, it's not.

Many of the "good old days" amps were JUNK! There are a few notable counter-examples of course, but amps (and guitars) have always been made to a price point, and the advent of CAD/CAM has seen an explosion of high-quality low (relative) cost guitars and amps that have quality records that the 'vintage' manufacturers wouldn't have dared dream about.

Case in point. Bugera is considered the bastard stepchild of the amp world because of their quality control issues, yet I suspect a rational analysis of the failure rates of early Marshalls/ Vox etc. would show that Bugera looks like a shining example of quality perfection in comparison. One only needs to read a few biographies of notable historical guitarists or bands to find out that they carried so many amps not because they needed that many on stage but because they were notoriously unreliable. Hell, Hartley Peavey built an empire on that fact by building near-bulletproof amps at a reasonable price, and even Peavey has had it's share of epic failures.

Guitars...don't even get me started. The average guitar of today is superior in almost every way to all but the very best historical examples.

"Vintage" is a catch-all term for the cork-sniffery crowd so they can avoid saying "old".
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#5
I own both and appreciate both. The vintage gear from the 50s and 60s is the sound of early rock and roll and most of it was hand made with materials and methods that will never be available again. It is part of music history. That has value.

These days though I gig almost entirely with 21st century stuff. It is excellent quality and sounds great. A modern LP, Strat or Tele stands up well against my 50s and 60s guitars in terms of tone and playability and I don't have to worry about some skel running off with my rare vintage guitar while I am on break or in the bathroom. If someone runs off with my 2003 Tele, it will be a downer but I can get another good one tomorrow for $600 used.

Appreciate the history behind the vintage stuff but get realistic about what you own and why you own it. They are tools for making music.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 20, 2014,
#6
Quote by Arby911
If that were true, it would be an awesome reason.

Since it's bullshit, it's not.
I agree with all of the message, but this in particular.

It's true though that they don't really make any amp that sounds like an AA864 nowadays...
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
Old amplifiers smell the best. Seriously.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#9
Quote by gregs1020
it is cool to have old stuff.


+1

I love old cars, guitars, amps, etc.

But I don't assign mystical properties to them, I just love 'em for what they are.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
For guitars the vintage vs modern thing does nothing for me.


For amps it does a lot. Vintage amps are easier to work on and replace parts. Easier to maintain. Usually more reliable and no pcb. "Usually" much higher quality parts than what is used today. Simpler circuits with not a lot in the way. Easier to mod if you are into that kind of thing. An example would be a Fender Twin

Top is modern Fender Twin
Bottom is Vintage Fender Twin


Same with Marshall.

Top is Vintage
Bottom is Modern



You definitely can get vintage style handwired amps brand new. You will pay out the ass hole for it though.
Last edited by cheesefries at Jun 20, 2014,
#11
Quote by gregs1020
it is cool to have old stuff.

Truth. I found an old horseshoe in the middle of the woods yesterday. Cool.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#12
I honestly don't know.

I have old stuff that is now typified as "vintage" merely because there's an interest in it. I have several old guitars that I bought back when because I thought they were cool and they were available cheap. They really aren't all that playable in the modern idiom and weren't then. An example is a '50's LP Custom, which has too-low frets for comfortable bending. I have three I bought for about $75 each (don't ask) that are now worth silly money because they're vintage. My ES-335-12 from '67 was cheap then, expensive now. A good guitar in any era, but there's interest in it.

By the same token, however, most of my Gibsons were built pre-1980. I really didn't do that consciously. IMHO, in order to get something with the same attention to quality from Gibson these days, you're really only confident in getting it if you're spending over $3500 (my most recent Gibson was over $4K) and probably only if you're buying from the Custom Shop.

I don't think old (er...vintage) gear necessarily sounds better. I've played over 25 different serial numbers of original "Holy Grail" '59 bursts over the past six years. I've found exactly one that I really considered buying and nearly did. And sometimes it does sound better. I've got a '71 Carvin speaker cabinet, a giant closed back ported thing with two 15" Altec Lansing 418-8B's and a mids/HF tweeter. You really can't get anything like that from a current manufacturer, and it does sound different *and* amazing. But that's simply because most manufacturers these days are no more than task-oriented cookie-cutter carpenters when it comes to both guitars and amps and they just build whatever sells.

Guitarists are sort of sheep, afraid to break out of a mold, and manufacturers are willing to feed that. Bass players seem more accepting of newer technology in their field (1500W solid state bass amps that only weigh 10 lbs are common, etc.). Keyboard players are technology hounds. Drummers...well...who knows what a drummer thinks. Or if.

So we get a lot more "vintage" interest among guitar players than you see among keyboard players. That's cool. I have some gear to sell to those folks.
#13
New versus old?

For some reasons it is hard to say if older is better as if we take the '70s opinion of how great a Fender Stratocaster was back then. Broken in was the case for Eric Clapton and brownie in 1967.

For me I visited a vintage shop in London UK and instantly fell in love with a Marshall 2104 50watt combo. 5 minutes on channel A and I asked for the price. 395£ was the answer and I still got it 13 years later. I love old sounds like Jimi, Fuzz face, univibe etc. but also the heavy tones of and justice for all.

So when you go hunting for the sounds nothing new and fancy this or that would do the job in sounding right. Mesa/Boogie Mark II c+ gain stage? Answer: Mesa Quad pre amp does and that is why I got one from 1991.

I can recall trying the Marshall JCM 2000 half stack and finding the channel A clean good but not that different but the gain this and that to much for my needs.

The answer to it all is does all the new features make you a better guitarist? Do you really need them?

How good are you if you plug straight into a vintage Marshall or Fender turned up?
#14
Quote by cheesefries
For amps it does a lot. Vintage amps are easier to work on and replace parts. Easier to maintain. Usually more reliable and no pcb. "Usually" much higher quality parts than what is used today. Simpler circuits with not a lot in the way. Easier to mod if you are into that kind of thing.
Vintage amps aren't particularly easier to mod, it's just a bit easier to access the components.
It's not like pcb's are glued to the chassis in most cases.

They're not really easier to maintain unless your maintenance consists in substituting parts.
The simpler circuits aren't really a plus - I'd rather have a complicated better sounding circuit.
It's also not even true the circuits were simpler.
Now we have a lot of complicated amps while the vast majority of amps there had one channel only or different inputs for different channels, but the majority of the circuit were used by both channels, so the circuits are smaller, but small amps today aren't in any way less complicated than the ones they used to make.

Higher quality parts?
**** no.
The reason why they invented the standby switch is that fender was designing amps with components that weren't high quality enough to handle the initial current they would have been received if they were in the circuit for the first minute or so of activity of the amp.
Nowadays standby switches are useless because they use better components.

The lower components myth comes from the fact that today, there are a lot of manufacturers that cheap out on that.
Thing is, if you were to pay as much as you would have paid for a bassman in the late '50s, you'd get better quality stuff today indeed.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#15
Turret boards are definitely easier to work on, man. With a PCB you have to lift the whole bloody board out to do anything on them; even pots, which often need changing. But any part of it really. You can do everything in situ with turrets. From a tech's perspective, turret boards are a dream.

Some of the old Fender amps were real gems, ie pre CBS. Leo would buy out big batches of things, often military surplus. You're not gonna find military grade shit in any modern mass produced amp.
This is true of other old amps too. Of course - and then there was Silvertone. Makes me laugh how those are now sought after. They were total garbage in their day. The cabinet is little better than cardboard. Complete junk - but people like them because they're old and Jack White uses one.
So as with all things, there was good and bad. Is a genuine Fender Blackface better than a reissue? You bet your arse it is but it will still sound good. But hey, Fender was best when Leo Fender was still calling the shots. Well, der. Of course they were better, what are you stoopid?
Marshalls were better when Jim was running the show too. I mean, of course. The man was a legend. If it wasn't for him they never would have become what they were. Those sort of reputations come from somewhere.

And as for features. Features do not an amp make. Spiders have shitloads of features and they are a piece of crap. For people that like old amps, features aren't a factor. Some people like single channel amps. They have their own charm if you know how to drive one properly. Somebody who wants a JTM45 is gonna spit in your face if you talk about features. "It's got tone controls and a volume knob - wtf else do I need?" Pthoooey!
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Jun 21, 2014,
#16
Quote by Cathbard


And as for features. Features do not an amp make. Spiders have shitloads of features and they are a piece of crap. For people that like old amps, features aren't a factor. Some people like single channel amps. They have their own charm if you know how to drive one properly. Somebody who wants a JTM45 is gonna spit in your face if you talk about features. "It's got tone controls and a volume knob - wtf else do I need?" Pthoooey!


Says the guy running a swappable, midi switchable multi-bay modular preamp design with a power amp that accepts almost any power tube...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#17
Yeah,

But in fact, lately I've been using that as a single channel amp anyway.
And just to be clear, I wasn't the person doing the spitting. There are people out there that don't give a shit about features. I can take 'em or leave them, myself. Depends on what I'm playing.


But really:

Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Jun 21, 2014,
#18
Amen Cathbard !! ..... most of the newer amp stuff is throw away when it breaks .... The Who is the only band I can think of that went through a lot of amps and gear back in the day
#21
Quote by Spambot_2
Vintage amps aren't particularly easier to mod, it's just a bit easier to access the components.
It's not like pcb's are glued to the chassis in most cases.

They're not really easier to maintain unless your maintenance consists in substituting parts.
The simpler circuits aren't really a plus - I'd rather have a complicated better sounding circuit.
It's also not even true the circuits were simpler.
Now we have a lot of complicated amps while the vast majority of amps there had one channel only or different inputs for different channels, but the majority of the circuit were used by both channels, so the circuits are smaller, but small amps today aren't in any way less complicated than the ones they used to make.

Higher quality parts?
**** no.
The reason why they invented the standby switch is that fender was designing amps with components that weren't high quality enough to handle the initial current they would have been received if they were in the circuit for the first minute or so of activity of the amp.
Nowadays standby switches are useless because they use better components.

The lower components myth comes from the fact that today, there are a lot of manufacturers that cheap out on that.
Thing is, if you were to pay as much as you would have paid for a bassman in the late '50s, you'd get better quality stuff today indeed.


I have to disagree with most everything you said. There is no friggin way the 4 cent chinese parts that go into the pcbs today are higher quality. Most of the tones people seem to chase after are also amps that have the simpler circuits. Tubes and Pots are mounted to the PCB in newer amps. I guess that's a Good thing eh?

Complicated circuit = better sounding? WUT?

Standby Switches useless? WUT? You ignoring the fact that standby has heaters for the tubes so it warms them up before you turn it on so they last longer?

Then you end with "The lower components myth comes from the fact that today, there are a lot of manufacturers that cheap out on that."
You are bi polar as can be brah
Last edited by cheesefries at Jun 21, 2014,
#22
Quote by cheesefries
I have to disagree with most everything you said. There is no friggin way the 4 cent chinese parts that go into the pcbs today are higher quality.
My chinese green film caps aren't half bad.
Plus lots of manufacturers don't use cheap parts.
Quote by cheesefries
Most of the tones people seem to chase after are also amps that have the simpler circuits.
AA864 Bassman - http://www.davidsonamp.com/sf/images/bassmanaa864.gif
JCM800 - http://mhuss.com/MyJCM/JCM800_2204.gif
Dumble ODS - http://i1.wp.com/pdfelectronics.com/wp-content/gallery/ods-hrm-build/ods-hrm-schematic.jpg
5150 - http://www.blueguitar.org/new/schem/peavey/evh_5150.gif

Now, the AA864 is my favorite sounding amp, but I've found a lot more people looking for the JCM800 sound or the 5150 sound, and among the people who look for the mildly distorted stuff, half of them'd go for the ODS instead of the bassman.
Quote by cheesefries
Tubes and Pots are mounted to the PCB in newer amps. I guess that's a Good thing eh?
Tube sockets are mounted on pcb's, not tubes.
And, unless you want to substitute them, it doesn't change anything.
Quote by cheesefries
Complicated circuit = better sounding? WUT?
What I wrote there was that I'd rather have a better sounding more complicated circuit than whatever other circuit.
In short I don't see what's the advantage in a simpler circuit.
Quote by cheesefries
Standby Switches useless? WUT? You ignoring the fact that standby has heaters for the tubes so it warms them up before you turn it on so they last longer?
As I wrote before, yeah, standby switches are useless nowadays if the amp's designed properly.

They were put there so fender could use cheaper parts that weren't able to handle the initial current load, but now (and even 10 years ago) stuff with higher tolerances is cheap enough for manufacturers to put inside amps.
Tubes don't suffer nor do they last less if you don't use a standby switch.

"Then why did they keep using them?"
When marshall copied the bassman what he did was slightly modifying the thing to accommodate parts that were cheaper in the UK and changing the product's name to JTM45.
People liked the stuff as it was and nobody ever thought about changing it even when it wasn't needed anymore.

Truth is, if you turn on your amp a couple of times without using the standby switch and it works afterwards, it's not gonna break for that reason if you keep doing it.
Quote by cheesefries
Then you end with "The lower components myth comes from the fact that today, there are a lot of manufacturers that cheap out on that."
You are bi polar as can be brah
I meant lower quality components, sorry, and I still stand by my argument.

There are people who use cheap components, but if today you were to pay an amp as much as you would have paid for a good amp in the '60s, you're going to get a product that's the same quality or even higher.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#23
Quote by cheesefries


Standby Switches useless? WUT? You ignoring the fact that standby has heaters for the tubes so it warms them up before you turn it on so they last longer?


Yes, standby switches are useless unless you have an old amp without a robust enough power supply to handle the inrush current.

There is NO other reason to have them, contrary to the myths that have perpetuated.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#24
Quote by Cathbard
Turret boards are definitely easier to work on, man. With a PCB you have to lift the whole bloody board out to do anything on them; even pots, which often need changing. But any part of it really. You can do everything in situ with turrets. From a tech's perspective, turret boards are a dream.


False. Through hole PCBs are practically eyelet boards with traces. You can heat them up from above and work on them just like any turret/eyelet amp. Cheap single sided boards are moderately more work, but I honestly don't see the big deal about removing one. Hell, I probably tore my 6505's board out 7 or 8 times per day when I was modding it and didn't think twice about it. It's really just not that big of a deal.

Also, turrets are pretty shit, TBH. If you're not careful and you run wires to the bottom of them, you run the risk of having a cold joint when replacing parts up top. Suhr actually ditched them solely because of that and now uses eyelets on their handwired amps.

Quote by Fumble fingers
Amen Cathbard !! ..... most of the newer amp stuff is throw away when it breaks .... The Who is the only band I can think of that went through a lot of amps and gear back in the day


It honestly sounds like you have no idea what you're talking about. Anything is repairable. Anything. It just depends on whether or not the cost of replacing it is lower than the cost of repairing, which when you're dealing with cheap entry level amps, is often the case. I'm not going to throw out my Fryette or Rhodes just because a grid resistor fried when a power tube blew. I actually had to do just that on my Ultra Lead a few weeks ago when a power tube went out and took a grid resistor with it. Took all of 10 minutes to swap it out, and almost all of that time was opening up the amp and closing it back up. A Germino I had for a while had the same thing happen, and it took the same amount of time.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#25
Quote by cheesefries
For guitars the vintage vs modern thing does nothing for me.


For amps it does a lot. Vintage amps are easier to work on and replace parts. Easier to maintain. Usually more reliable and no pcb. "Usually" much higher quality parts than what is used today. Simpler circuits with not a lot in the way. Easier to mod if you are into that kind of thing. An example would be a Fender Twin

Top is modern Fender Twin
Bottom is Vintage Fender Twin

Same with Marshall.

Top is Vintage
Bottom is Modern

You definitely can get vintage style handwired amps brand new. You will pay out the ass hole for it though.


That second Twin is a clone, not a vintage original. Those components are all modern manufacture, and no vintage original is that clean or color coordinated.

As for the Marshall, you're comparing two completely different amps. Try building JVM on turret board. It would be a pain in the ass, and take far too long to make it worthwhile at their target price point.

Leo and Jim didn't exactly use the highest quality components back in the day either. Most were barely adequate at best. Caps in particular were rated at expected voltage or just marginally higher. Same with resistors. Same with transformers (especially the tweed era, the OTs are laughably underspec'd). Marshall used mil surplus transformers for a time, IIRC, but eventually moved on to using parts from the lowest builder by the beginning of the 70s. Shit wasn't rainbows and unicorns back then.

Furthermore, simplicity does not equal good. I can think of a number of simple amps that sound like poo, and a number of complex ones that sound awesome. Not to mention that most simple amps don't get the sounds that I want, and what use is an amp if it can't even do that?
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#26
Quote by mmolteratx
That second Twin is a clone, not a vintage original. Those components are all modern manufacture, and no vintage original is that clean or color coordinated.

As for the Marshall, you're comparing two completely different amps. Try building JVM on turret board. It would be a pain in the ass, and take far too long to make it worthwhile at their target price point.

Leo and Jim didn't exactly use the highest quality components back in the day either. Most were barely adequate at best. Caps in particular were rated at expected voltage or just marginally higher. Same with resistors. Same with transformers (especially the tweed era, the OTs are laughably underspec'd). Marshall used mil surplus transformers for a time, IIRC, but eventually moved on to using parts from the lowest builder by the beginning of the 70s. Shit wasn't rainbows and unicorns back then.

Furthermore, simplicity does not equal good. I can think of a number of simple amps that sound like poo, and a number of complex ones that sound awesome. Not to mention that most simple amps don't get the sounds that I want, and what use is an amp if it can't even do that?

old stuff is cool.
#27
Quote by gregs1020
old stuff is cool.



You already said that?

Maybe you forgot, because you're "vintage"...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#28
I saw an old silvertone at gc a few months back I wabted it because it had the most omiinous clean tone I ever heard. But yeah silvertones are generaly crap my stance on vintage gear is if you like it buy it, that simple just be preparrd for headaches with electronics.
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I'd honestly fap to anything with a set of genitals as long as I find it aesthetically appealing.
Last edited by losing battle at Jun 21, 2014,
#29
Yeah, Matt, if you've got a Rhodes. I thought we were talking about mass produced stuff. Boutiquey type stuff will crap all over 99% of vintage stuff (excluding dodgey crap like Phaze of course, I mean good builders). Mass produced in Leo's day wasn't the same as mass produced modern stuff. If you're including small manufacturers then yeah, no advantage. Fender with Leo in command was better than Fender after he let go of the reins. Same with Marshall, as soon as Jim handed control over to the bean counters - well, you know what happened.


Edit: I knew I should have written turret/eyelet. I was being lazy, I'd just got home from a gig. Underwiring can be a pita on turret boards but most of us have our own little tricks to cope with that. I use icecream (popsicle) sticks. I slide it under the board beneath what I am soldering to hold the under wires in place. No dry joints then.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Jun 21, 2014,
#30
Quote by gregs1020
old stuff is cool.

Reported for being old and senile.
mojostompboxes.com
#31
Quote by cheesefries


Standby Switches useless? WUT? You ignoring the fact that standby has heaters for the tubes so it warms them up before you turn it on so they last longer?


I really haven't found a really good reason for standby switches to exist. And there's no real evidence that tubes last longer if you switch to standby first and then turn on the amp (and yeah, I've always known what they're *supposed* to do). My experience with this is going to be anecdotal, but there are about 15 tube amps sitting around here and none of them really seem to care if the standby switch is ever used.
#32
A standby switch reduces inrush current by staggering switch on. It doesn't increase tube life, it's just kinder on the transformer.
Tube radiograms didn't have standby switches so they weren't concerned about inrush current on those. Standby switches were only on guitar amps; it had nothing to do with inrush current or any other bs. They were to be used for standby (ie muting between sets) so you didn't have to wait for the amp to warm up again.
It was realised that that wasn't a good way to mute the amp because it caused cathode poisoning so they stopped recommending that. However people expect to see a standby switch on a tube amp. If people don't see one they often think they are looking at a solid state amp so standby switches continue to be put on amps. They switched tact to "it is a better way to switch on your amp" to justify their existence.
The reality is that they are there for marketing purposes. Nobody makes an amp with a PT so shitty that it needs a staggered switch on. Basically, standby switches are now marketing bollocks and nothing more.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#33
Quote by greeny23
Reported for being old and senile.

i'm just resonating part of colin's post.

lern to reed.
#34
Quote by gregs1020
i'm just resonating part of colin's post.

lern to reed.


Reported for making dad jokes
mojostompboxes.com
#36
Vintage equipment is great for being an indy music snob who only uses vintage gear when playing covers of artists you listened to before they were cool.
#37
i have a bunch of old stuff. most of it i bought because it was a affordable, i think it is cool and i liked the sound of it (actually, those are the same reasons i bought all my new stuff too, though my new stuff on average has been more expensive).

my favorite old stuff generally has some weird stuff going on with like pentode preamp tubes or old inefficient speakers... stuff they wouldn't use today.

i have new stuff too, i use both quite a bit.

Quote by jpnyc
Vintage equipment is great for being an indy music snob who only uses vintage gear when playing covers of artists you listened to before they were cool.


well, looks like i am pigeonholed. it's funny cuz i don't feel like a snob, i don't play hardly any covers and i have no idea if the artists i listen to are popular or cool.

i still have no idea what 'independent music' is supposed to be, all these new classifications for music i hear getting thrown around are mind-numbing to me.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Jun 24, 2014,
#38
I think a lot of it comes from Fender and Marshall. Fender was better under Leo and Marshall was better under Jim. That is to be expected because people like Leo and Jim don't come along every day; they are legends for a reason.
But that doesn't mean that all vintage stuff is better. As I pointed out, Silvertone existed too. But there are some really good modern builders as well. Old Fenders (pre CBS) are better than new Fenders, nobody would argue that point. That doesn't mean the same holds true for ALL amps. All trout are fish but not all fish are trout.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#39
All of it is crap. Make it yourself.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#40
Now you're talking.



Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
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