#1
So I just got a new guitar and was reading about care and maintenance, and apparently humidity can warp and crack guitars, and cause all sorts of problems.

I live in Minnesota where the humidity can very quite a bit, yesterday night it was about 65%-70% and it can also get quite low during parts of the year. I read that a guitar should be kept around 40-50% humidity.

I was planning on keeping it on a guitar stand in my room, but I'm worried about the humidity causing problems.

Is there a good way to regulate the humidity of my room or part of it without a big and noisy humidifier/dehumidifier? It's a pretty small room, maybe 10' x 11' and do they have small portable humidity controllers for cases and bags for when I store it? I don't want to spend very much as I already spent a lot on the guitar.
#2
Unless you live in the desert or in a fridge and your guitar is made of nitro I wouldn't worry about it.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#3
Humidity is a huge deal for acoustic guitars but not nearly as big a deal for electric guitars. During the summer, spring, and fall you don't have much to worry about. In the winter when it gets really cold it would be a good idea to keep the guitar in the case with a humidifier. For most people in most places this wouldn't be necessary but having lived in Minnesota myself, I know that Minnesota winters are much dryer than most places.
Not taking any online orders.
#4
Does everyone in Minnesota keep their guitars in a case with a humidifier? Don't you guys have climate control in your houses/apartments? Or radiators?
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#5
^it regularly gets as cold as -20 during Minnesota winters. These low temps make the moisture fall out of the air so humidity is VERY low. If you heat your home with central air it actually pulls even more moisture from the air. A radiator doesn't zap away moisture like central air but it doesn't add it moisture either so if the outside air is dry then the inside air is dry too.
Not taking any online orders.
#7
Quote by CorduroyEW
Humidity is a huge deal for acoustic guitars but not nearly as big a deal for electric guitars. During the summer, spring, and fall you don't have much to worry about. In the winter when it gets really cold it would be a good idea to keep the guitar in the case with a humidifier. For most people in most places this wouldn't be necessary but having lived in Minnesota myself, I know that Minnesota winters are much dryer than most places.


Thanks for answering ^^
Yeah, I'm not too worried about the summer. When it gets really humid and hot we turn on the air/dehumidifier. I'm more worried about in the winter when it gets really cold and dry. I played the oboe all throughout middle and high school and cracking was a huge problem with wooden oboes if you didn't keep a small sponge with some water in the case.

What are your suggestions for a small humidifier I can buy to put in the case? Also, currently I have a real durable, well crafted soft case for it. Will this be good at maintaing humidity inside, or should I get a hard case?
#8
OP even electrics need to be kept care of. If the guitar is new and came from a totally different humidity it'll need time to acclimate to its new home.
Too dry and you'll get fret sprout which can be even cause damage if you've got fretboard binding. Gibsons/Epiphones binding will often crack/split when the fret ends protrude from the sides of the fingerboard. For unbound fretboards you need to file the ends down.
Moving on.....
#9
Humidity does indeed damage the guitar, but it's almost unnoticeable unless the difference is huge and drastic difference in the humidity, salinity on the other hand is a huge problem. Unless you have an acoustic guitar, it won't do much of a difference (sound wise). But if you really want to control the humidity around the instrument there are stuff built for this purpose, I just can't remember the names.
Last edited by mp8andrade at Jun 21, 2014,
#10
Just buy a cigar humidifier and put it in the case (using distilled water to charge it), if it would make you feel better. It will keep your case ~60% RH, considering it's not as tightly sealed as an actual humidor. Something like this: http://www.cigarsinternational.com/humidification/38308/large-rectangle-humidifier/#p-8431 and can be found at any cigar shoppe.

We run humidifiers all winter long, I hate getting zapped by static!!