#1
Like, for example, in Dream Theater's Voices, can be heard from 1:40:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDGSvbpB9Kg

From what I found it should probably be what is called a volume pedal, but from the few demonstration videos of such products that I've watched it didn't sound so similar. In this example (and some other Petrucci-tracks) it almost sounds like it was reversed. I assume that in the studio you could add these effects as a part of the sound mixing in the DAW in order to use less pedals, but when playing live - what is the dedicated effect? Turning around your guitar's volume knob isn't so practical.

Thanks in advance.
#2
Well; the easiest way to do a fade-in or a fade-out in the studio is by using the fader(s) on the mixing board. Just move the fader up or down when you are completing the mix-down, and you are there. That is how most of them are done.

If you want to do it live, then careful manipulation of a good volume pedal is probably the best way. Trying to manipulate the volume knob on an electric guitar is generally not a good idea for such fades, because the pots on most guitars are not smooth and continuous across the turning rotation. Some of them are practically on/off switches; given the way they suddenly cut off or let loose the volume.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
I think a lot of those things are studio done but like Fatal said you can manipulate things in a live setting with gear/gadgets but in most recordings its all studio work.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#4
I believe this is referred to as "volume swelling" or just "swelling." There's a bunch of examples on YouTube, here's one that shows how to set up your effects:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1HZeF-axDU
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#5
Quote by FatalGear41
If you want to do it live, then careful manipulation of a good volume pedal is probably the best way. Trying to manipulate the volume knob on an electric guitar is generally not a good idea for such fades, because the pots on most guitars are not smooth and continuous across the turning rotation. Some of them are practically on/off switches; given the way they suddenly cut off or let loose the volume.

Then the guitar has the wrong taper pot and should be replaced.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#7
Speed pots exist so you can do volume swells with your pinky while playing.
#8
Pinky swells are easy IF you have the volume knob close enough to where you're doing your picking that you can easily nab it. It also makes a bit more sense to have a master volume.