#1
Hi guys, I have been playing guitar for a few years now, mostly learning technique and now I am trying to get into all of the theory and create my own music and improvs by listening to some country music that uses pretty much 4 chords the whole song for me to play to.

Now what I am puzzled with, is with an artist called kasey chambers (nullabor song to be specific) she uses a capo on the 2nd fret, and then does these chord shapes. G, D, Em, C.

Now I understand those shapes transposed to the capo on 2nd is F, C, Dm, Bb which is in the key of F if I understand correctly.

So what I am not understanding is how could I improvise over those chords, How do I run an F pentatonic scale if the capo is on the 2nd, blocking my F root note on E string, which I am guessing there is a way to move the scale around somehow.

Any ideas on solo structure would be greatly appreciated, I just need to see some soloing or improvisations over these chords that I can sort of break down and study how they work. Thanks for reading sorry for the wall of text
#2
First of all , youre asking about soloing right? so why would you use a capo to solo? Capos are only useful (to my knowledge) to transpose open chords.

This "scale" as you have it in your mind, is just a geometric shape youve gotten used to.
What makes it a scale are the notes not the shape, and the notes as im sure you know repeat over the entire Fretboard. So since the notes of an F major pentatonic scale are: F G A C D. Just find these notes all over the fretboard and you dont have to think about fixed shapes or running out of notes.
#3
thanks for the reply, first of all, the capo is needed for the song and I cant take it off mid song. Now, if I can use the F Maj pentatonic scale, can I change to the C Maj pentatonic scale for the chord progression, and can I change scales mid solo, like use the F Maj pentatonic and transition into a F Major harmonic scale as well. Thanks for your input. If it seems like I am not getting something please assist me.
#4
Ok the song is in F, which gives us the diatonic scale of F G A Bb C D E.
the C major pentatonic is made out of. C D E G A, all of these notes are in the F major scale already.
So if youre changing to the "c Major pentatonic scale" all youre really doing is playing the F major scale but making it more complicated. catch my drift? the Song is in F and has a normal, in-key- progression. it's an I V VI IV, which is very beautiful and i actually use in one of my songs as well. So just play the F major scale and have fun. no need to change to c Major pentatonic, there is nothing to gain from it but complication. the sounds are the same.

Sure you can use the F major harmonic scale, if you can make it work. You can use any scale you want really. But i wouldnt with this progressions because the F major harmonic scale has a b6 in it, the Db. And since no chord in the progressions uses this note it would sound out of place, that doesnt mean you cant use it though. If the progression had an A7 chord(III7) for example, it would work great at that point.

if this is gibberish to you, i suggest you start learning Basic theory and your fretboard.
Last edited by Ignore at Jun 23, 2014,
#5
I don't want to sound stupid, but you're not in F. If the shapes are G, D, Em, C, and you've moved those UP two semitones with the capo, then you are in A major, with this progression: A, E, F#m, D.
You'd then need an A pentatonic (or E blues if you're feeling adventurous) rather than the F pentatonic. I believe the capo would not be restricting you at this point, as A is fret 5 on the E string amongst multiple other places. The simple thing to do is learn your major scales in every position, and the same with your pentatonics, blues, harmonic/melodic minor, and perhaps for a jazzy sound the 7 modes, the diminished scales and once you have this level of knowledge of the fret board, your capo no matter where it is will never be in the way as you know the alternatives for each scale. Practise, practise, practise is the key principle of learning scales and once you know them you can literally play anything.
#6
Quote by Ignore
Ok the song is in F, which gives us the diatonic scale of F G A Bb C D E.
the C major pentatonic is made out of. C D E G A, all of these notes are in the F major scale already.
So if youre changing to the "c Major pentatonic scale" all youre really doing is playing the F major scale but making it more complicated. catch my drift? the Song is in F and has a normal, in-key- progression. it's an I V VI IV, which is very beautiful and i actually use in one of my songs as well. So just play the F major scale and have fun. no need to change to c Major pentatonic, there is nothing to gain from it but complication. the sounds are the same.

Sure you can use the F major harmonic scale, if you can make it work. You can use any scale you want really. But i wouldnt with this progressions because the F major harmonic scale has a b6 in it, the Db. And since no chord in the progressions uses this note it would sound out of place, that doesnt mean you cant use it though. If the progression had an A7 chord(III7) for example, it would work great at that point.

if this is gibberish to you, i suggest you start learning Basic theory and your fretboard.



Thanks for the input, some parts I will read up on a bit more, but just by playing around with the F major scale I can feel the music in my ears sounding very nice haha.

@Boreesimo Thanks for your input too, but I am not sure if you are correct (though you could be), for example, with the capo on the 2nd fret, the G shape makes an F sound, I got my info from this chart here - > http://www.geneclark.com/capochordchart.html

And that is where I figured the shapes make up to be in he key of F. But I may not be grasping something, so I am definetly looking forward to additional input. playing around with the F major pentatonic scale does sound like it fits in good with the progression I am using though, so again its puzzling me a bit lol.
#7
Here's the F major pentatonic over the whole fretboard.



The root notes are marked in black.

I'd practice just playing in F major pentatonic and as your knowledge of theory expands over time, then start thinking about adding in chord tones that aren't in the scale, using other scales, etc.
#8
An open G chord capoed on the second fret will move up two semi tones which makes it an A chord, the song is A. But in the end it doesnt matter at all, because the theoretic example above translates towards all keys. Just play the major scale over that progression and if you miss any sounds that you are looking for just start filling in the missing notes and see what sounds good to you, have fun
#9
Thanks guys I will play around a little ( a lot) tomorrow and work some sweet tones out. You have all helped me a lot. Any additional input doesn't hurt but for now I feel I can only help myself at the moment
#10
The Capo will raise the notes up, if you look at the frets/notes you have in the G-shape chord with the capo on 2nd fret you have
5 - A
2 - C#/Db
2 - A
2 - E
4 - C#/Db
5 - A

An A major chord.

The same for the other shapes
D - goes up 2 semi-tones to E
Em - goes up to F#m
C - goes up to D

Easy way to work it out instead of a chart is to just count up the number of notes equal to the Fret the capo is on. So I have the capo on 4 and play a G shape chord. I think G, (1)G#, (2)A, (3)A#, (4)B

You can play the song without the Capo, but you will have different voicings of the chords. You can play A, E and D open but you'd probably need to barre the F#m for the easiest way to play it.
Last edited by Sephiroth976 at Jun 24, 2014,