#1
What would you guys rate my voice from 1-10? I would love some pointers as I know I'm not the best singer in the world, but hopefully I'm better than the bad people you hear on american idol/x factor auditions.

By the way, I'm using a laptop mic so the quality is not the best. I also can't afford lessons so I would really appreciate some great advice. Be a tough critic. Thanks in advance. Here's the link:

https://soundcloud.com/someone1236/untitled/s-VAxlW
#2
Foundation is there. You have to learn how to access the higher parts of your range; you fall flat on the higher sounds in the cover ("here in [HE]aven") should be higher, as well as a few other ones.

You had good control over sustained notes from what I could hear, even if they were flat, they were consistent which is a great feature to have. I struggle with this as I overthink a lot of times when I sing.

Also, you're singing the song a lot lower than the recorded version which is completely fine but you don't want to get stuck in the trap of being able to sing in only one octave. This seems like it was done in the second and/or third octave for the most part (I don't think you hit the fourth octave or the first octave). The first octave is tough for most people to hit; hell, anything below an E2 is a struggle for a lot of guys so don't worry too much about that. Worry about the fourth octave; most guys hit their peaks within the fourth octave (right around a G4, give or take a whole step, for most baritones - you sound like a baritone). I know there's a prevailing thought within singing to think that most people have a God-given talent and that you've been cursed, but you can 100% reach the end of the third octave as well as the fourth octave and it won't even take too much effort for the earlier notes (B3, C4, C#4, D4).

Like I said to another poster here; you'll notice that as singers sing higher, the volume of their voice increases; this is tough to do at the start for a lot of people because of self consciousness and not wanting to be heard but you're gonna have to sing loud if you want to sing high. Make sure you're doing it correctly and not scratching your throat.
#3
Quote by Milan999
Foundation is there. You have to learn how to access the higher parts of your range; you fall flat on the higher sounds in the cover ("here in [HE]aven") should be higher, as well as a few other ones.

You had good control over sustained notes from what I could hear, even if they were flat, they were consistent which is a great feature to have. I struggle with this as I overthink a lot of times when I sing.

Also, you're singing the song a lot lower than the recorded version which is completely fine but you don't want to get stuck in the trap of being able to sing in only one octave. This seems like it was done in the second and/or third octave for the most part (I don't think you hit the fourth octave or the first octave). The first octave is tough for most people to hit; hell, anything below an E2 is a struggle for a lot of guys so don't worry too much about that. Worry about the fourth octave; most guys hit their peaks within the fourth octave (right around a G4, give or take a whole step, for most baritones - you sound like a baritone). I know there's a prevailing thought within singing to think that most people have a God-given talent and that you've been cursed, but you can 100% reach the end of the third octave as well as the fourth octave and it won't even take too much effort for the earlier notes (B3, C4, C#4, D4).

Like I said to another poster here; you'll notice that as singers sing higher, the volume of their voice increases; this is tough to do at the start for a lot of people because of self consciousness and not wanting to be heard but you're gonna have to sing loud if you want to sing high. Make sure you're doing it correctly and not scratching your throat.


Thanks for the advice. I think I may have the vocal range of a bass, since I can sing from E2 to C4. How could I increase this range to sing multiple octaves? Also, as of now, does my voice sound annoying or unique to you and would my voice be adequate enough to perform in front of people (friends,family, karaoke, nothing too extreme) without being ridiculed. How would you say my voice is compared to the average untrained singer?
#4
I'd like to hear you sing over a backing track before making that call. Acapella is really tough to judge when it comes to saying how good you'll sound when performing around others. Acapella generally doesn't sound the greatest unless it's sung by pretty damn experienced singers, in my opinion. There's nothing annoying to me about your voice but you do need to add some emotion, which again, is something that I've also struggled with at the beginning. To do this you can accentuate certain lines, or sing certain parts with an 'airy' type feeling or singing louder (and thus higher) for certain parts. When you sing everything relatively the same, it tends to get boring.

I actually am not sure at which point people sound 'good enough' to sing in front of others. I'm actually someone who rarely ever does... In fact, I've only ever sung in front of my vocal teacher and a buddy who I jam with every once in a while. I'm of the opinion that I'm not ready to sing in front of others despite the fact that I've been singing for almost two years, I'm mostly on key, have a good range (about B1-A4), and all that shit. I think somebody else would probably be better suited to answer the question of whether you're ready to perform.

As for the bass vocal range, and singing in multiple octaves (you already have almost a two octave vocal range, so you're pretty well almost there)... You don't sound to me like a bass singer; you may be on the lower end of the baritone spectrum but really do try to hit those higher notes because I'm 100% confident that you can at least stretch your voice out to an E-F4.

I believe in "Hallelujah" by Jeff Buckley, the "baffled king com[posing]" line hits an E4. You can practice with that as it's a well known song. There are also countless songs hitting D4 but I honestly can't think of too many at the moment but look into these things. I'm not sure if this is advertisement because I neither own nor post at these forums but Google "The Range Place". It's a forum which is dedicated to notewatching for particular artists, so you can find songs that peak slightly outside of your E2-C4 vocal range and try hitting those notes.