Poll: Which sport?
Poll Options
View poll results: Which sport?
Basketball
33 23%
Hockey
49 34%
Football/Soccer
49 34%
Football/Gridiron
28 19%
Rugby
42 29%
Tennis
23 16%
Baseball
19 13%
Golf
18 12%
Boxing
36 25%
Your mum
20794 14242%
Voters: 146.
Page 1 of 6
#3
Different types of athleticism for different sports. For example, American football and rugby is incredibly explosive, whereas proper football is more of an endurance sport.

I would agree though that basketball is definitely up there, as it has explosiveness and endurance, and is in a smaller space than most other sports, which demands greater control over their bodies.

In other words, I don't know
superman is killing himself tonight
#4
this should be good


gymnastics

Edit: ehh, that's probably a lot of skill and athleticism.

I dunno, maybe NFL when you think of guys like Kaep, AP, Shady, Watt, bunch of people I'm forgetting...
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
Last edited by WCPhils at Jun 24, 2014,
#5
NFL, but NBA players are the biggest freaks. Nobody 6'8" should be able to do the things they do.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
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i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

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#6
im never not impressed by american football so i'll say that

the conditioning involved to move that quickly despite taking hit after hit, over a prolonged period, must be ridiculous
| (• ◡•)| (❍ᴥ❍ʋ
Last edited by Cianyx at Jun 24, 2014,
#7
oh you want me to tell you my favorite sport?

baseball
i don't know why i feel so dry
#9
Love, because it takes the most heart.

That or badminton.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#10
~athleticism~ such a nebulous term --
are offensive lineman more ~athletic~ than marathon runners?
#13
Quote by neidnarb11890
~athleticism~ such a nebulous term --
are offensive lineman more ~athletic~ than marathon runners?

uh, yea
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#14
Quote by macashmack
Not your favorite, what you think requires the most athleticism.


see narb:

Quote by neidnarb11890
~athleticism~ such a nebulous term --
are offensive lineman more ~athletic~ than marathon runners?


thus i will stand by my favorite sport, baseball, just because it's my favorite.

~dances like your avatar~
i don't know why i feel so dry
#15
Quote by Weaponized
All sports do if you give 110%

That's not possible. You can only give up to 100%.
#16
dunno if its a 'sport' but anybody that can finish one of these or an equivalent (or longer if such races exist) is way more athletic than most mainstream sport atheletes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ironman_Triathlon
i dunno if i'd consider being able to take lots of hits like in football or rugby makes you super athletic. Its impressive no doubt, but your body isnt as under much stress overall i would argue.
Last edited by ironman1478 at Jun 24, 2014,
#17
Quote by Eastwinn
thus i will stand by my favorite sport, baseball, just because it's my favorite.

~dances like your avatar~

xo
#18
Quote by ironman1478
dunno if its a 'sport' but anybody that can finish one of these or an equivalent (or longer if such races exist) is way more athletic than most mainstream sport atheletes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ironman_Triathlon
i dunno if i'd consider being able to take lots of hits like in football or rugby makes you super athletic. Its impressive no doubt, but your body isnt as under much stress overall i would argue.

To me, and I may be wrong here, but marathons , ironman races, and etc are more moeasures of fitness fitness than sthleticism.
superman is killing himself tonight
#19
Quote by Baby Joel
To me, and I may be wrong here, but marathons , ironman races, and etc are more moeasures of fitness fitness than sthleticism.

They're not even measures of fitness, but endurance. My mom ran a marathon, but she couldn't do a single pullup at the time. Marathon runners tend to have amazing endurance and no strength.
#20
I think American football, ice hockey and rugby are probably up there for me. You need size, strength, speed and endurance to be able to perform well in either of them. Basketball potentially too.
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#21
Quote by Cianyx
im never not impressed by american football so i'll say that

the conditioning involved to move that quickly despite taking hit after hit, over a prolonged period, must be ridiculous
I don't understand the conditioning aspect of American Football.

Isn't it a 60 minute game played over three hours with a roster of around 50 odd players with just 11 on the field at any given time?

Do the same 11 players play the full 60 minutes? Or are those 60 minutes spread between the full roster? Are there limited substitutions? How many different players typically take the field for one team during the course of a game?

When it comes to conditioning, Boxing>American Football.
Si
#22
hey if you guys are going to have this discussion seriously you need to start putting forward working definitions. reading through, these words are could use definitions. and don't just go to a dictionary, the definition needs to be something you can work with. not something vague

fitness/endurance
athleticism *
sport

* most important one obviously
i don't know why i feel so dry
#23
Quote by 20Tigers
I don't understand the conditioning aspect of American Football.

Isn't it a 60 minute game played over three hours with a roster of around 50 odd players with just 11 on the field at any given time?

Do the same 11 players play the full 60 minutes? Or are those 60 minutes spread between the full roster? Are there limited substitutions? How many different players typically take the field for one team during the course of a game?

When it comes to conditioning, Boxing>American Football.


Think of it this way:

If you're in a skill position such as a receiver or defensive back, do 7 40 yard sprints with 10-20 seconds rest in between.

If you're a lineman, do 7 sets of 3 squats at 90% of your maximum with 10-20 seconds in between.

It's not so much that you're moving constantly, it's that what you're doing is at such a high intensity with such short rest period (while you're on the field) that over the period of a game you are absolutely knackered by the end
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#24
Quote by jambi_mantra
Think of it this way:

If you're in a skill position such as a receiver or defensive back, do 7 40 yard sprints with 10-20 seconds rest in between.

If you're a lineman, do 7 sets of 3 squats at 90% of your maximum with 10-20 seconds in between.

It's not so much that you're moving constantly, it's that what you're doing is at such a high intensity with such short rest period (while you're on the field) that over the period of a game you are absolutely knackered by the end

also, you have tons of gear on making you slower & heavier, and its pretty ****ing hot (miami for example, is ridiculously hot, combining that with the gear can lead to heat stroke, something that happens a lot in high schools). so you have to be pretty strong.
#25
I understand having to be stupid strong to be good at AmericN football, but I've always myer prefer athleticism to mean more of your body's natural strength/build. For instance, LeBron James is probably one of the most athletic people alive. But is he as strong as a lineman? Probably not.

I agree with Eastwinnnnn. We need proper, working definitions that we can all agree on.
superman is killing himself tonight
#26
It comes down to who runs and jumps the most during a game. There should be numbers out there.
#28
Quote by Baby Joel
I understand having to be stupid strong to be good at AmericN football, but I've always myer prefer athleticism to mean more of your body's natural strength/build. For instance, LeBron James is probably one of the most athletic people alive. But is he as strong as a lineman? Probably not.

I agree with Eastwinnnnn. We need proper, working definitions that we can all agree on.


Half the issue is that there's so many positions that have specific physical traits that it's hard to pin point individual ones. I mean even with "lineman", yea an offensive guard is just gonna be a fat guy who's hella strong type, but a defensive end? He's gonna be strong as hell but also damn fast.
No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable


@gossage91
@overtimefitnessau
#29
Quote by Baby Joel
I agree with Eastwinnnnn. We need proper, working definitions that we can all agree on.


without prior agreement i can easily argue for baseball, since it's my favorite.

there is an intense amount of practice required to pitch even a shitty pitch. the amount of skill involved in throwing a fast ball at 96mph then following up with 80mph curve ball dead in the zone both times because you planned it to be, then throwing one right down bottom center and having it drop and the last second and striking em out. that is ungodly skill. there is both precision and strength required to do that, and starters are expected to do that consistently for over half the game.

on the batting angle, you need to put the power of your whole upper body into a flimsy piece of wood to hit a target about the size of you first that may not end up exactly where you expected. you have to be able to make split second decisions about whether a pitch is good or not while also consider who's at base and where. that's not just power, that's intelligence and skill. again, ungodly skill.

then when the ball skirts past short stop and it's time for a double play, the diamond turns into a synchronized swimming team as base men must decide, in a split second, which play to execute and do it as fast as possible.

if you disagree with me, it's cause your definition of athleticism is different than the one i made up to justify baseball as my choice. this is why you all need to be explicit on these terms.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#30
Quote by jambi_mantra
Half the issue is that there's so many positions that have specific physical traits that it's hard to pin point individual ones. I mean even with "lineman", yea an offensive guard is just gonna be a fat guy who's hella strong type, but a defensive end? He's gonna be strong as hell but also damn fast.

In that case you have to compare the most athletic positions in each sport. For basketball it would probably be small forward. Proper football it wouldn't really matter, like maybes midfielder has more athletic demands but I don't know. American football would probably be wide receiver or something.
superman is killing himself tonight
#34
Ice hockey. Endurance to skate full blast for at least 20 min a game, strength to give and take hits, hand eye coordination for playing the puck, speed to catch up to the play, and balance to do all of this on ice.

Players range from age 18 to their ****ing 40s and still somehow play and it boggles my mind. I also don't understand how big Ben Bishop at 6'8 can play goal as well as he does.
#35
Quote by lolmnt
NFL, but NBA players are the biggest freaks. Nobody 6'8" should be able to do the things they do.

Check your privilege.

poll makes me happy

^ height is a significant advantage as a goaltender, think about it.
#36
why is darts not on this list?
You who build these altars now

To sacrifice these children
You must not do it anymore
#37
Quote by the bartender
why is darts not on this list?

Because its nothing compared to the excruciating trial that is bag toss.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#38
Quote by DukeDeRox
Players range from age 18 to their ****ing 40s and still somehow play and it boggles my mind. I also don't understand how big Ben Bishop at 6'8 can play goal as well as he does.

In a lot of sports you just don't get very many guys over 40 playing at the highest level of competition because they're just too old and simply no longer have the athletic edge to compete with guys in their 20s.

The fact that so many hockey players can continue to compete in the highest level of competition over the age of 40 is not an argument that the sport requires more athleticism than other sports, in fact it could be used as an argument to the contrary.

For example, in the NBA there have been around 22 players in history that have played over the age of 40. In hockey the number is around 80. Why? Because as you get older athletic ability deteriorates and top level basketball requires a higher level of athleticism than hockey.

EDIT According to ESPNScrum.com's list of oldest test rugby players only three are over 40. (none of them were 41 or over - it's a young man's game) Baseball on the other hand has had seven guys over 50 playing in the majors.
Si
#39
"athleticism" is way too vague a concept. More specifics are needed. Is it more athletic to be able to sprint 100 yards faster than your competitor, or is it more athletic to complete a marathon faster than your competitor? Is strength involved in athleticism, or does it involve purely speed and agility? Does the mental process of, say, an MLB pitcher count as an athletic ability? While not physically exerting, it allows them to dominate an athletic event. What about the different demand of different positions in each game? An MLB catcher isn't going to outrun an NFL wide receiver, but he's sure as hell going to outrun an NFL center. Tom Brady makes me look like Usain Bolt, but he'd still probably be able to outrun Prince Fielder. Chris Davis could probably bench press Trindon Holliday, but Joe Thomas could probably bench press Chris Davis.

More details are needed for how we're defining athleticism.
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Last edited by necrosis1193 at Jun 24, 2014,