#1
I'm 44 years old and decided that I want to take up the guitar.

Just for fun, my reasons are:

1- I really enjoy music a lot and would like to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for it.
2- My daughter is learning (she's 10) and asked me if I wanted to learn to.
3- I want to exercise my brain in a different way

I like alternative and rock, think U2, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Arcade Fire, Def Leppard, The Killers, Coldplay, Oasis, a little David Bowie now and then.

I am not kidding myself, this is just a hobby and a desire to gain a basic competency and hopefully be able to play some songs that I like pretty well and pick up a few songs that my daughter likes (the pop rock stuff that kids her age listen to, she doesn't have terrible taste in music so it'll be okay).

Based on this, where do I start in terms of buying a guitar? My daughter has a new acoustic guitar that she and her mother bought.

Essentially what's the easiest thing to learn to play that will not highlight my lack of musical talent? I have browsed guitars for sale online but without an idea of what I'm looking for I'm just spinning my wheels.

In terms of budget I'd rather not overbuy because, really, who knows? Looking at local classifieds there is fair bit of availability in the $100-$200 range (nice looking acoustic Yamaha at $150, a Tagima (?) acoustic/electric for $150 (new, this does not fill me with confidence but I know nothing), a Fender Sonoran California SCE for $250 and so on).

My own conclusion is either acoustic or acoustic/electric, just based on the fact that my daughter has an acoustic.

Any feedback/suggestions/encouragement sincerely appreciated.
#2
Hi and welcome James.

You're kind of on the horns of a minor dilemma here it looks like. The style of music you listen to (and would presumably like to learn to play) is largely electric. However with your daughter playing acoustic, there may be some wisdom in maintaining some sort of parity with regard to equipment.

With regard to electrics, there are usually a bunch of pretty decent inexpensive used instruments at Guitar Center, still others on sites such as Craig's List and ebay, etc. The Yamaha Pacifica generally gets pretty good grades at being a quality entry-level electric that can be had pretty cheap even brand new. Leave some room in your budget for a small practice amp if that's the way you decide to go.

Acoustics are a little different animal, and I confess I'm out of my depth here. You may want to check the Acoustic/Classical Guitar sub-forum here and try to get some feedback from folks more in-the-know than myself.

Best of luck and let us know how you make out! And again, welcome!
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#3
Hi James, It warms my heart hearing your story. I am much younger then you and I really hope that one day I get to play music with a child of my own.

On to your questions. I recently posted a thread here that you might want to take a look at, just to get a grips with what to look for on a guitar.
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1648212

Like Tim said, the music that you are hoping to play is prominently played on electric guitars yet your daughter has an acoustic and you want to jam with her. My advice, get an electric!

An electric guitar and the right amp will be able to produce a wonderful clean sound that will compliment your daughters guitar as long as your amp is not to loud.

Considering you are both beginners it would be a great thing to have an electric and an acoustic around the house, I'm sure you would let her play it if she wanted and I can almost guarantee that if she continues to play she will eventually want to get her own electric.

Having both types of guitars opens up many musical possibilities, acoustics and electric both have their place. Sometimes they can sound almost identical and other times worlds apart depending on the effects and playing style.

Some recommendations. This is a great starting guitar with quality you can trust.
http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Les-Paul-Special-II.aspx

and a smaller one for your daughter
http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Les-Paul-Express.aspx

For your amp just get one of these.
http://www.marshallamps.com/products/amplifiers/micro-amp-series/


Trust me those little 15watt practice amps ARE NOT LITTLE, they pack a punch and is totally unnecessary for bedroom playing. These 1Watt Marshall micro amps are awesome.

All the best to you
#4
I bought an Epiphone Les Paul 100 as a first electric and was pleased with it as well. Many of the online stores allow you to pay over time interest free which is a nice way to go. It's great when one of your children has a shared interest.

Last edited by NormH3 at Jun 26, 2014,
#5
Thanks very much for the advice. The guitar recommendation is really appreciated.

Victorgeiger - Thanks for the link to the other thread which will be really helpful. Also for the amp advice, I for sure would have overbought.
#6
I spent over three decades playing acoustic, and making unsuccessful efforts to play electric before I finally realised that I was paying way too much attention to the guitar and nowhere near enough to the amp. Victor's advice re the Marshall micro might work well for you, but it certainly didn't for me. I would be thinking about getting something like a Roland Micro Cube amp at the very least. That is a good modelling amp that allows you to experiment with different sounds of fairly good quality.

There are plenty of good inexpensive guitars these days - Yamaha, Squier, Ibanez are the first that come to mind for me. - But get something that makes you want to pick it up and play it!
#7
Quote by Tony Done
I spent over three decades playing acoustic, and making unsuccessful efforts to play electric before I finally realised that I was paying way too much attention to the guitar and nowhere near enough to the amp. Victor's advice re the Marshall micro might work well for you, but it certainly didn't for me. I would be thinking about getting something like a Roland Micro Cube amp at the very least. That is a good modelling amp that allows you to experiment with different sounds of fairly good quality.

There are plenty of good inexpensive guitars these days - Yamaha, Squier, Ibanez are the first that come to mind for me. - But get something that makes you want to pick it up and play it!


Yes the Roland Cube is also a fantastic option. I was unlucky enough to have a terrible first amp, so much so that there was so little drive without decent volume that it either sounded soft and terrible or over loud and unruly. Something about the volume knob that when it went above 2.5 it hit another level of loud that drove my parents crazy.

So just be warned about the cheap 15watt that are going around. If you stick to a good name like Marshall or Roland then you wont go wrong.