#1
Hi,
i was wondering if every scale has the same amount of positions on the fretboard or not...
Thanks
#3
^ I thought he meant more like, for example, are there as many positions of G major as C major (but I might have misinterpreted what he meant).

Or maybe he meant different families of scale (say major versus minor versus pentatonics etc. ), in which case it's sort of dependent on how many notes that scale has since you can technically form a new position from every note in the scale.
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#4
yes I did mean how if there are as many positions for the C major for example as a G major. Sorry if I was not clear enough
#5
No worries, I thought that was what you meant. Sean will be able to answer better than me (as he's put a lot more thought into this than I have), but the simple answer is yes. Just where exactly the frets fall might mean that you run out of room for one of the positions etc.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#6
There are as many notes in C major as in G major so yeah, there are as many positions. But I wouldn't think scales as positions.

I would suggest learning more about scales. Don't just learn them on the fretboard. Learn how to construct a scale. Learn the intervals in a scale and learn the note names in a scale. The most important scales are the major and minor sclaes so learn them first. Oh, and most importantly, learn how they sound. Sound is the most important thing in music. That's because music is all about sounds. Nobody cares if you use the 1st or 5th position of a scale. What matters is how it sounds like. So don't just learn the scales visually. Also learn their sound.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Every scale spans the entire fretboard.

The answer to your question depends completely on how you break that down into "positions".

If you build each position around the root note then you will typically have five positions as there are six places that any given note will appear on the fretboard (before it repeats), one on each string. Two strings are both E notes so the root notes there occur on the same fret so will be part of the same position. This gives five positions.

If you build each position off each scale degree of the given scale on the E string then you will have the same number of positions as there are notes in the scale.

But whatever method you use, if you are comparing the same scale built off a different root note they will have the same number of positions.
e.g.
C Major scale, G Major scale, A Major scale... etc they all have the same number of positions.
C Pentatonic, G Pentatonic, A Pentatonic...all have the same number of positions.

But depending on how you break up the fretboard the C Major scale and the C Major Pentatonic scale might have the same number of positions or they might have a different number of positions.
Si
#8
thanks for your answers guys! and maggaramarine, thanks for the tip! I have just started learning scales and understanding them but I haven't thought about the fact that is is also very important to know how they sound, so thank you!
#9
^ Yeah. Many people kind of take the sound for granted. But it is the most important thing in music. And when you think about it, it's pretty obvious.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
it is pretty obvious when you think about it but what I'll try to do now is always close the gap between theory and music by applying the concepts I just learned