#1
Hi Everyone,

I am having an issue with the major barre chord with the root beginning on the 5th string. For instance, A# minor.

I am to barre the first fret and then with my third finger hold down strings: 2,3, and 4 on the 3rd fret while not interfering with the first string.

The problem is, my 3rd finger keeps touching the first string and so, I can't get the E# on the first string and fret to ring out.

Is it humanly possible for the 3rd finger not to interfere with the 1st string when barring the minor chord?

Do you have to play the first string? Do you have to be double jointed.?

I have this problem on all the major chords with the root on the 5th string with both my electric and acoustic.

Any advice would be most helpful. Sometimes I feel I am the only one.

Thanks,
LGuitarjsm
Last edited by LGuitarjsm at Jun 26, 2014,
#2
Try holding the third fret notes with all three available fingers. This can also be hard, crunching all of your fingers into such a small area. Neither technique is easy, but one will be easier than the other.

Also worth noting, I frequently see players just not bother with the highest note, just playing something like x1333x. I'm at least guilty of this while making my own music, though I try to get the highest note if I'm performing someone else's music that clearly includes it. Not that I would suggest limiting yourself and not bothering to get it down, but it's also typically not a big deal and it's a problem that a lot of us run into.
#3
Honestly, and maybe this seems lazy...but I've been playing for 11 years now, and I don't even bother with the note on the high E string with those kind of chord shapes. So, say we have a Bmajor chord, like so:


The notes of the Bmajor chord are always B, D, F#. We're hitting the B on both the A string 2nd fret and the G string 4th fret. We hit the F# on the D string 4th fret.
Now, we can try to hit another F# note on the high E string 2nd fret. But...we don't have to. It might make it sound a bit fuller. But I don't think it makes a difference.


So, I don't worry about it. I put my index finger down for the root note (B, in this case; remember that's A string 2nd fret here) and then barre the F#, B (octave), and D notes with my ring finger. I don't play the F# note that could be played on the high E string.
#4
It is a difficult chord to play but yes it is possible to do it with just your first finger barre and third finger barre while not muting the high e string. It's not very comfortable to do though and so it is often left out of the chord. With or without that high e string note, you are still playing a full major chord with all of the required notes.
#5
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Honestly, and maybe this seems lazy...but I've been playing for 11 years now, and I don't even bother with the note on the high E string with those kind of chord shapes. So, say we have a Bmajor chord, like so:


The notes of the Bmajor chord are always B, D, F#. We're hitting the B on both the A string 2nd fret and the G string 4th fret. We hit the F# on the D string 4th fret.
Now, we can try to hit another F# note on the high E string 2nd fret. But...we don't have to. It might make it sound a bit fuller. But I don't think it makes a difference.


So, I don't worry about it. I put my index finger down for the root note (B, in this case; remember that's A string 2nd fret here) and then barre the F#, B (octave), and D notes with my ring finger. I don't play the F# note that could be played on the high E string.


you lazy git. i totally do that too
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#6
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Honestly, and maybe this seems lazy...but I've been playing for 11 years now, and I don't even bother with the note on the high E string with those kind of chord shapes. So, say we have a Bmajor chord, like so:


The notes of the Bmajor chord are always B, D, F#. We're hitting the B on both the A string 2nd fret and the G string 4th fret. We hit the F# on the D string 4th fret.
Now, we can try to hit another F# note on the high E string 2nd fret. But...we don't have to. It might make it sound a bit fuller. But I don't think it makes a difference.


So, I don't worry about it. I put my index finger down for the root note (B, in this case; remember that's A string 2nd fret here) and then barre the F#, B (octave), and D notes with my ring finger. I don't play the F# note that could be played on the high E string.


This!

Don't worry about the high E string for major chords on the 5th string.
#7
I want to thank everybody for making me feel better about my difficulties and that I am not the only one.

It sounds like, in general, don't worry about the high E string and so, although, I will try my best to technically play it, if I don't allow the high E string to ring, I won't stress over it.

Again, I really appreciate all of your help.

LGuitarjsm
#9
I jut use my pinky instead of my third finger. You can mash it down on there hard enough to put a good backwards bend at the knuckle that allows the high E to ring out nicely. I guess the fingertip is sort of angled up towards the headstock a bit to give it more room.