#1
Being a fan of the Arctic Monkeys and Jack White, I wanted to start to learn their guitar solos they have in their songs. I'm not the best guitar player myself, being that I've taught myself for the past year and, frankly, I don't have the time or money to start lessons. I need to know some good techniques and advice to really get my guitar playing skills up to the level where I can play these solos or (hopefully) more complex ones. Anything helps.
#2
There is nothing else for it other than "start learning a solo". The artists you've listed have fairly simple solos so they're actually ideally suited as a starting point.

Liste to the solo over and over until you've got the sound internalised and know exactly what it's supposed to sound like, being able to vocalise the solo will help a lot too. From there it's simply a case of starting at the beginning, breaking it into sections and learining it. If you hit a technique you don't know then go away and learn about it, spend some time practicing it then come back to the solo. It'll take you a while as it's your first time, but the more you practice and the more you learn the better you get at it.
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#3
Quote by what.you.doing.
Being a fan of the Arctic Monkeys and Jack White, I wanted to start to learn their guitar solos they have in their songs. I'm not the best guitar player myself, being that I've taught myself for the past year and, frankly, I don't have the time or money to start lessons. I need to know some good techniques and advice to really get my guitar playing skills up to the level where I can play these solos or (hopefully) more complex ones. Anything helps.


Luckily for you, their solos are tremendously easy from a technical standpoint. Pick a simple sounding solo, and try to figure it out by ear.
#4
^ Nah get tabs/music. Trying to figure it out by ear when you're only starting out and might do it incorrectly is like trying to tell someone who's new to maths to figure out calculus by him/herself.

I'm not saying you should never try to figure them out by ear, but you want to make sure you're on the right tracks before you do that. In my opinion.
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#5
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ Nah get tabs/music. Trying to figure it out by ear when you're only starting out and might do it incorrectly is like trying to tell someone who's new to maths to figure out calculus by him/herself.

I'm not saying you should never try to figure them out by ear, but you want to make sure you're on the right tracks before you do that. In my opinion.


I definitely support this statement. Figuring out anything in the beginning was pretty much impossible for me because it was immensely frustrating and I simply couldn't tell what was what. After a few years I never had issues figuring stuff out by ear if I took my time, and this really doesn't hinder me.

Playing by ear is a very helpful skill, but learning the guitar isn't centered around it. I started out by only using tabs, and over the years added music theory, standard notation and ear training. The only reason I stuck to playing is because the road was both fun and had me progress at a reasonable pace.
#7
I'm inclined to disagree with the advice given above. The math/calculus analogy doesn't hold up.

If we look at all the artists we revere, what's the thing they had in common? They listened and learned by ear. From Hendrix to Petrucci to Jack White, none of them had tabs! They would sit and listen to solos they had on record, pause the record every half second so they could keep the sound of the note in their heads as they fiddled with the fretboard looking for a matching tone. This rinse, wash, repeat method is what helped them be become so intimately familiar with their guitars.

I certainly empathize with the advise given before me, because that's how I went about learning guitar. However, I wish I put more energy into transcribing solos myself rather than relying. I say this because at the end of the day, it's not about memorizing a bunch of your favorite solos.* It's about gaining techniques and understanding the thought process behind them. "How'd they perform this lick? Is that a double-stop?" "Oh that's an F#! But why is she playing it over a C major?"

Besides this, you also get the benefit of having a well-trained ear that is very useful in a jam setting where you might want to replicate or work off of what the other guitarist is doing, and you don't want to be looking at their fretboard the whole time.

I can't claim to have followed his transcribing series fully, but his videos have certainly helped me out and help me keep truckin' when I'm all out of inspirational fuel!

http://youtu.be/xNlyoGud2A0


*This stems from what I would like to get out of guitar. However, if you are looking to get something else out of playing music, my reasons might not apply or jive with how you feel about playing guitar.
Last edited by royisinabox at Jun 28, 2014,
#8
Quote by royisinabox
I'm inclined to disagree with the advice given above. The math/calculus analogy doesn't hold up.

If we look at all the artists we revere, what's the thing they had in common? They listened and learned by ear. From Hendrix to Petrucci to Jack White, none of them had tabs! They would sit and listen to solos they had on record, pause the record every half second so they could keep the sound of the note in their heads as they fiddled with the fretboard looking for a matching tone. This rinse, wash, repeat method is what helped them be become so intimately familiar with their guitars.


To be fair, maybe with the exception of jack white (and even jack white is old enough that his formative years probably predate internet tabs), they didn't have tabs back then. They had to do it by ear. Are you saying that Hendrix, with all the modern gadgets etc. he adopted really pretty quickly, wouldn't have used tab?

It'd be like saying newton and leibniz had to figure out calculus on their own, so you should too. They didn't want to do it- they had to.

I'd say the analogy holds up just fine- in fact what you posted actually backs it up even more.

I tried figuring out some stuff at the start when I didn't have tabs, too- the big problem, if you ask me, is that it's not just your ear. You also have to be familiar enough with the guitar to be playing the thing "right" (I was often playing the right notes, but in an awkward way which a more experienced guitar player wouldn't have done).

I'm not saying you shouldn't work on your ear at all, ever (or even at the start, when it comes to actual ear training, not transcribing)- I'm saying that learning first and working out later is pretty much the foundation of almost all education, as far as I'm aware, at least. Trying to work things out when you have little or no foundation isn't terribly efficient. That's why we have teachers and schools etc.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Yeah in the early days tab is a great help as it helps you know when your ears are correct
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#10
^ It also lets you know how more experienced guitar players would play something on the neck.

(Granted, a lot of tabs have mistakes in them )
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Your best bet would be starting to learn scales. Start with the Pentatonic Minor, Blues Scale, Major Scale and Minor Scale. When you go through these scales in different keys you'll start to recognise notes from your favourite solos and will be in a position to work out the rest. This will also allow you to learn the notes and most importantly intervals on the fretboard.
#12
The way i learned fast solo's was simply playing along with the song and reading the tab. LEARN THE SOLO'S IN CHUNKS! play and memorise little pieces of the solo at a time, once you get that down, continue doing it till you have the whole solo down. Once you get the WHOLE solo down practice it all the way through slowly!! (a bit slower then the actual recording) and once you get it down perfectly (with proper technique & cleanly) Then you can try playing it faster or at the actual recording's pace.... Good luck, In my honest opinion this approach has always worked the best for me and a few others i know. The 1st real fast hard solo i learned were the ones in Mr. Crowley by Ozzy it took me weeks! I thought i'd never nail it! now i can play it clean and even faster then the recording... Its all about determination, i wanted to give up so bad lol!
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#13
First try to learn a few scale shapes like pentatonics, blues scale, major and minor scale.. then listen to the solo you would like to learn and try to find out in which scale pattern it is. If you know the scales you will find it familiar to one of the scales. Then you either try it out from Youtube lessons or if you're good with reading tabs, get a tab of the solo. Listen to the solo to find out how it goes rhythmically and then learn it from the tab piece by piece. First learn one piece, then practice it a bit, then the next piece.... until you know how the whole solo goes. Then first practice it slowly until you get the technique down perfectly, and then try to practice it faster and faster until you reach the pace of the original solo. Listen to the solo's you want to learn, choose the one that seems the easiest and first learn that one. Later choose a more difficult one and so on... This is how I was taught to practice solo's when I first started to learn about lead guitar and I still go this way when trying to figure out new solo's. I guess it works for many guitarists, at least for those I know.
Last edited by guitarbird23 at Jun 29, 2014,