#1
hi all,

long time lurker here.


i wanted to know what advice you pro's might have for me. ive played guitar for about 7 years now, im technically sound but a little sloppy but my theory is non-existent.

The truth of the matter is i have many issues, i dont know scales, i cant put them to use, my riffs are boring and samey like im trapped in a box with the same rhythm.

i havent had hardly any band experience and i cant until im happy with how i play guitar!

the thing is im told by many that hear me im really good, mainly cause i play riffs like hot for teacher (at least the verse part anyway) but im really not happy. All i want to do is play music but i dont think im naturally gifted and i never know where to start.

my callouses die out after about an hour despite playing every day, palms sweat profusely and stick to the neck.


where do i start on my road to recovery? i wanna play in a band and live off music, i find it so hard to take that i find i have a vast and intelligent music taste and yet i struggle so much with my own ideas, is this because i dont know where im going, or im expecting too much from just mucking around with basic chords and riffs without any direction?


like i said i can play good guitar, play fast and slow. but i want to make my own music and im just absolutely lost.

i dont need motivation, i love music, its everything to me, so i stick at it, but for the love of jehovah i need pointing in the right direction, my practice now consists of playing black sabbaths supernaut over and over then folsom prison blues then just ****ing about trying to play in a minor fast. Im not going anywhere!!!!!!
#2
- Take formal lessons if you haven't already. You won't need them forever, but it helps to have someone who knows which directions to send you in to help you get to where you want to be with your playing.
- Get yourself a band. It doesn't matter how good you guys sound, playing with people will make you better. I'm from a small town, and even here I've found a great variety of players across all genres and abilities. Nobody is going to care whether or not you sound good.
- Broaden your musical styles. Listen to more genres (even ones you don't like at first), learn more songs and techniques. My favorite bands are ones that I absolutely could not stand the first few times I heard them, but I forced myself to endure.
- Learn theory. Even a basic understanding of what notes make up a scale or how rhythm works will help you write better music and be inspired more. The more you know, the more connections you will make when you listen to music, and you will be inspired more. Learning other instruments on top of guitar can help as well, because they bring a new way to look at things, and help you to better understand the things you already know.
- Slow down. If you sound sloppy, slow it down and make sure everything sounds good before bringing it up to speed.
- Learn to sing. You probably have no intention to sing at all right now, and most of us didn't either when we started. If you want to get out there, being willing to sing is going to help you get into bands, regardless of how good you are.

Don't get discouraged, there are people out there that suck more than you, and we went through most of the problems you're going through.
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#3
^that.

And get your head out of the way. Don't overthink things. You love music so play music. Don't worry about how good or bad you are, don't worry about where you are in your life or where you wish you were, don't worry that it sounds the same all the time, just play music.
Si
#4
You say your callouses 'die out' - I assume you mean your fingertips get very sore. Do you have an acoustic guitar? - practice on it for at least a half hour a day, acoustics are (typically) hard to play, require more finger strength and will build up your finger strength (and callouses).
I've met any number of guitarists who learned (and only play) electric guitars, and can't play an acoustic to save themselves. The converse is not true, though.
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#5
Quote by MikeBmusic

I've met any number of guitarists who learned (and only play) electric guitars, and can't play an acoustic to save themselves. The converse is not true, though.


Maybe not, but you show me an exclusively acoustic player playing an electric and you can tell, all the same. If electric is sufficiently different from acoustic that exclusively electric players find acoustic difficult (and they do, don't get me wrong, I don't disagree really with that statement), it sort of stands to sense that acoustic players will find electric difficult too. At least certain types of electric playing (high gain etc. where you have to have your muting down well etc.).

I guess what I'm saying is it's difficult to play acoustic to a high standard... but it's also difficult to play electric to a high standard, just the same. If it weren't you'd see everyone scooting about the fretboard like guthrie govan or someone like that. The basics are easier on electric, but once you get past that they're pretty much equally difficult, just difficult in different ways.
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jun 27, 2014,
#6
The most important thing right now is to get some band experience. If you say you are technically skilled enough which it sounds like you are, then a band will help get you out of the rut you are in. Have some confidence in yourself and once you start jamming with a bunch of guys you will see the inspiration just start to flow if you let it.

You would be best to look for a band that has a lead guitarist who is writing most of the songs. That guitarist will guide you and teach you many many things that you may have missed. You might even teach him a thing or two.

I think you might be mentally blocking yourself, that is ok we all do it sometime. Some new musical experience will do you good. I have a sneaking suspicion that you brain might be becoming bored with the sound of your own guitar. You are probably playing stuff that is pretty good but because you have heard it or things similar it to many times you ust feel like it is repetitive and crap. Let me repeat, it's all in your head!

Adding a band to the mix will recharge your musical battery and if it take a while to get the band going at least start by changing the way you practice.

Create a new distortion effect that you like and find a drum machine software that is easy to put beats together with. I would recommend EZ drummer 2. This will give your practice and workflow a totally different approach and hearing your guitar riffs with a drum beat may give you that desired inspiration.
#7
Quote by JD Close
- Take formal lessons if you haven't already. You won't need them forever, but it helps to have someone who knows which directions to send you in to help you get to where you want to be with your playing.
- Get yourself a band. It doesn't matter how good you guys sound, playing with people will make you better. I'm from a small town, and even here I've found a great variety of players across all genres and abilities. Nobody is going to care whether or not you sound good.
- Broaden your musical styles. Listen to more genres (even ones you don't like at first), learn more songs and techniques. My favorite bands are ones that I absolutely could not stand the first few times I heard them, but I forced myself to endure.
- Learn theory. Even a basic understanding of what notes make up a scale or how rhythm works will help you write better music and be inspired more. The more you know, the more connections you will make when you listen to music, and you will be inspired more. Learning other instruments on top of guitar can help as well, because they bring a new way to look at things, and help you to better understand the things you already know.
- Slow down. If you sound sloppy, slow it down and make sure everything sounds good before bringing it up to speed.
- Learn to sing. You probably have no intention to sing at all right now, and most of us didn't either when we started. If you want to get out there, being willing to sing is going to help you get into bands, regardless of how good you are.

Don't get discouraged, there are people out there that suck more than you, and we went through most of the problems you're going through.


+1

The most important thing for now, IMO, is to find a good teacher who can show you the way and join a band. Preferably a cover band, since you don't know theory, playing something already written will not be a pain in the ass and, as you said, you already can play some.

Singing is not only important for getting into bands, it also helps training your ears and creativity, since when you sing there is no place where you can put your fingers and get the sound you want (as far as I know), you have to mentalize the sound you want before you actually go for it.
This helps with getting music more in your head and less in your fingers. Sure you can do it without taking singing lessons, but trust me, it's a very effective way.
#8
It's funny, you fit the exact profile of the kind of player I like to help.

I think since you can play well, that more important than anything else, is learn and understand theory, and that in turn raises your confidence. If you are like other students that have come to me, it's not that you can't play, its that you're not confident that you can step into any situation and flourish as a knowledgeable musician. That you will be called to step up to the plate and be found wanting. Riffs are fine, but they aren't songs, they don't teach you to understand what youre doing on the guitar and why it works, and theres probably a small hance inside that, you know this, and it feeds into your lack of ...I dont want to say confidence...because I think you probably have a good feel for where you're at, but *comfort*, and you know that you're not where you want to be.

Listen, I teach all that stuff, but I also mentor people for free. If I can help you out, either by answering questions, or mentoring advice, hit me up and I'll do my best.

Best,

Sean