#1
Just introducing myself, 40 years old and finally learning to play the guitar! I've had a love for classic and hard rock since my first Quiot Riot cassette lol. I first started last year by buying a Fender acoustic electric package at my local music store (yeah I know, but I want to make sure before I get that Strat lol). Anyways I jumped in with an instructor who didn't show up half the time, and after 3 months when I couldn't even play a chord he was talking about a recital in the mall where the music store is, I knew it was time to move on. After laying off the whole winter, and finally finding a different teacher (a classically trained one), after 2 months I'm playing chords, and simple songs. I'm just now on the third g string notes but I can read some simple music and I know I'm improving. I guess a lesson here is not all teachers can teach. I have a lot of theory and no practice lol. I read constantly about different players/guitars and can tell one guitar from another. I love the Stratocaster and have even held one and I'm not getting into which is better, I just like it. I'm rambling on here but I'm just enthused to do something I've always wanted to do. I practice anywhere from 30-45 minutes a day..lots of late work days. Two questions I have which I'm sure have been asked two billion times, how long before I can really be able to play fairly well? And, any hints, tips or tricks for a newbie? My teachers favorite saying is, do that a couple thousand times and you'll get it lol. Thanks for listening!
#2
Hello and welcome! Sounds like you're well on your way, I'm glad you didn't get altogether discouraged with your first "teacher."

As far as how long before you will be able to play fairly well...I guess that all depends on the individual. Younger players tend to absorb things a lot faster, but older players generally have a bit more focus. Some can sound pretty amazing after a few months, others may practice for a couple of years and still not quite have their chops. Just keep at it, grow at your own pace, and most of all have fun!
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#3
Yeah just to add on, having fun has a lot to do with learning and absorbing the info also. So try the songs that sound easy but are a all time personal favorite too. Like Iron Man. Play on the easy songs until you can fling your wrists all around nice and relaxed playing it behind your head and walking around singing and not looking at the fret board all while playing. Then keep learning new things. Good luck with it
#4
Thanks guys! Yeah I'm playing twinkle twinkle little star and even my wife says "you're getting better!" LOL
#5
There ya have it, everyone knows wives don't fib. LOL That's awesome tho, bud! Good on ya!
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp
#6
Quick question. I was reading another post by a fellow that was talking about starting guitar and liking rock...I too love rock music and as I mentioned I'm now learning on the Fender acoustic I bought. With the fact that I eventually want to move on to an electric, how different playing wise is an acoustic and electric for someone like me? I mean besides the obvious physical characteristics, is transferring from acoustic to electric fundamentally the same or is it a whole different ball game?
#7
Aside from the obvious sound and look/feel of the instruments, the main difference (usually) is that electrics typically have a lower action than many acoustics. The action of a guitar describes the distance between the bottom of a string and the finger board, and is an indicator of how firmly a string must be pressed in order to fret the note clearly. A high action takes more effort to press the string, and can result in more fatigue and sore fingers after prolonged playing. On the other hand, an action that is set too low can result in fret "buzz" where the string actually vibrates against the frets, causing an audible buzzing sound and often interferes with the actual note being played.

Obviously, a properly set-up action is going to be one that hits the sweet-spot: being low enough to allow effortless fingering while high enough to avoid buzz.
I am a StarGeezer: some call me..."Tim."*

* - Heartfelt apologies to Monty Python for blatant plagiarism. Those responsible have been sacked.
__________

Epiphone G-400 "Goth"
Peavey Vypyr 75 Amp