#1
I got my guitar in March and I was trying to learn a new song. I tuned my G string down to E for the song. So I would simply practice the song once a day, which required me to tune it again. I think that because I did this every day, my string broke, even though I was tuning it down, I had to tune it back up every time as well, so it snapped.

Since then I am just afraid to tune my guitar, because I think the strings will break. When should I tune my guitar, and for how long should I keep it in that specific tuning? (Btw, I have Martin LX1E)
#2
I feel you. Try to minimize the tuning, it hurts the strings when tuning too much. Also try to have the guitar in the specific tuning for as long as possible. Search songs that are in the same tuning.

The ideal thing would be to have two guitars with one tuning, imo. So guitar 1 is only in standard. And the other guitar is a whole step down. win
#3
That happens to me pretty often. Probably because I change my tunings all the time. But normally, I try to leave it set in that tuning for about 3 or more weeks.

I recommend tuning each string as slowly as possible. Especially if it's anything higher than standard tuning. It seems like it always pops a lot easier if you're rushing. Just be delicate in general. Works for me.
Quote by snipelfritz
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Sometimes I fuck a bamboo shoot.


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Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#4
We watched a concert with Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young years ago... Stills was very fond of alternate tunings and his guitar-guy brought him out a different guitar for almost every tune...

Until you can afford a dozen guitars, try lubricating the nut slots on yours with some graphite... And make sure the string slots in the nut are not too tight and binding the string.
Also... Next time you change strings, check the tuning posts closely to make sure there are no burrs or sharp edges.
Finally, make sure when you change strings that they are applied to the post properly, with no overlaps when winding them.
All that should at least minimize problems.

Some musicians, like Leo Kottke, made a career out of on-the-fly de-tuning for effects.
#5
Quote by Bikewer
...[ ]....Some musicians, like Leo Kottke, made a career out of on-the-fly de-tuning for effects.
With that said, I think I remember his stage hand bringing him another guitar quite frequently.

I saw him during a dark decade in my current memory, so I can't really say that with the authority I'd like.
#6
This is a common problem. Does it break at the crimp on the tuner post? If so, it might help to take the sharp edge off the post hole to soften the break angle of the string. I've done this a couple of times. Adding a few more turns of string on the post might also help,say four or five instead of the recommended two or three, though that can cause unstable tuning.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
With that said, I think I remember his stage hand bringing him another guitar quite frequently.

I saw him during a dark decade in my current memory, so I can't really say that with the authority I'd like.

On Leo's first album, "6 and 12 String Guitar", you can clearly hear a string break on one cut....

One of our friends spent a week trying to figure out what Leo was doing to make that sound before it dawned on him....
#8
It's the same principle of bending a paperclip constantly, the more you do it, the weaker the strings get. If you want to straight out avoid it, change your strings every 2 weeks, helps maintain tone, fresh strings wont break, and teaches you to eventually string your guitar proficiently.

I hate it when I meet a professional guitar player who can't even string up their own guitar correctly, gonna poke someones eye out, or it looks like a rats nest.
#9
Thanks for all the advice. Since I cannot really afford to own multiple guitars, I'll just keep it in a certain tuning for a few weeks, like Joshua Garcia suggested. Thank you all
#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
....[ ].....I hate it when I meet a professional guitar player who can't even string up their own guitar correctly, gonna poke someones eye out, or it looks like a rats nest.
I from the hip era, when people would coil the strings at the peg end on their Martin D-28s, in lieu of cutting them. Always impressed me as snobbish and annoying. I mean really, I you want to be a hip legend, make a drip candle mountain.
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
I from the hip era, when people would coil the strings at the peg end on their Martin D-28s, in lieu of cutting them. Always impressed me as snobbish and annoying. I mean really, I you want to be a hip legend, make a drip candle mountain.


I always thought they were antennae to pick up the vibes
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
I from the hip era, when people would coil the strings at the peg end on their Martin D-28s, in lieu of cutting them. Always impressed me as snobbish and annoying. I mean really, I you want to be a hip legend, make a drip candle mountain.



Wut?
#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
Wut?
I guess you had to be there....

( Although granted, I did spell, "if" incorrectly... ).



Note also that if this picture were period correct, the wine would have been "Mateus".


Sorry, I couldn't find a Martin.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 2, 2014,
#14
I've always had a problem with this, altered tunings will chew your strings. The G string on an acoustic guitar is the weakest, tuning it down to E is fine, but not if you go right back up to G and do this multiple times your strings won't last 2 weeks. Everytime you tune back up to G from anything below F you run the risk of snapping. I try to keep the G string as stable as possible, meaning that for a week or two I'll stick to G and F#, then down to F or E for a while. Then I might tune it back up to F# and leave there for a day or so, then very carefully back up to G. This way I get the maximum life out of my strings, whereas before they'd last 2 weeks tops.

I'd say for the most part you only have to worry about the G string, the others are pretty resilient. When tuning up I like to go up a bit, tug on the string a bit and stretch it, then a bit, stretch it, repeat (this helps when tuning up). Also changing your strings regularly is always a good thing.
#15
If you are having any problem in tuning your Guitar In the Standard Tuning Then Go For Drop Tunings They Are At A very Much Lower Octave ...By this way You can Prevent Your Strings From Breaking ..