#1
Hey, I was wondering, what would be a good room to record audio in? I write my own music and would love to record, but my space to do the recording is very limited.

What kind of room should I use to get a good sound that I can then manipulate later? Carpets, hard floor, curtains, low ceilings? Size of room? Should I put the microphone next to a wall so I sing into a wall, or into the room. I was told not to record in the center of rooms.

Also, It was suggested that I get myself a Blue Snowball microphone, so I did. I'm noticing that it picks up a lot of noise. Not only does it catch my voice, but also catches the sound of my moving slightly, and records it. It is noticeable in the recordings, even when I have the mic facing at my face. Is this will all microphones, or should I look into getting a different microphone?

Thanks so much!!!
#2
Your best bet would be to experiment in as many places as possible. There is no one size fits all when recording with mics.

If you have too much noise being recorded into the mic, you could try putting a gate plugin and set the threshold appropriately.
#3
I'd only worry about treating the room once you have a decent set up for your actual recording hardware. What you have is a cheap mic, it'll work but don't expect anything great from it.

Treating the room is an expense you can put off until after you've bought better equipment.

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#4
"How to get the best recording?"

Pay someone else to do it, as a general rule.
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#5
Quote by ChemicalFire
"How to get the best recording?"

Pay someone else to do it, as a general rule.


This. Not being a prick or anything but chances are unless you're putting hundreds of dollars and hundreds of hours into learning the ins and outs of what you're doing then you'll be able to find someone else who'll do it for you at a better price.

e.g. I have ~$1000 of equipment (a couple of mics, a beginner level interface, some headphones, and an electronic drum kit) probably accumulated around about 1000 hours of practice recording/mixing/mastering. I could record an album myself no problem, and it would sound pretty good. If I pay myself $15/hr (around what I earn at work, and a bloody cheap rate for a studio engineer) then I've effectively invested $16000 in recording. I have a friend who would track/mix/master tracks for $100 a track. He has better gear, more experience, and usually puts out better stuff than I can. Following that logic I have to record 160 tracks before it's even approaching cost effective for me to learn to record. I chances are I will be lucky to take more than 50 tracks through from tracking to mix to master.
Learn how to record because you want to learn, not because you want to record.

If you're still keen then congratulations. Your mic will do, it's not ideal but there's nothing wrong with it (I've definitely used worse gear). Condenser mics (like yours) are pretty sensitive, little things like movement noise will get covered up in the mix, if you can't bury it then remove it with a noise gate or similar.
#6
The Blue Snowball is a cheap mic that is well suited for podcasting and gaming. You can certainly try it for music recording, but your results will get better with a mic more suited for music AND your particular vocal characteristics. Experiment to see what works best for you and wherever you are trying to record. Every room is different. You can spend hundreds and thousands of dollars on equipment and acoustic treatment, but you need to learn how to work it before you see improvement.
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#7
Good, thanks for the tips, guys! Any suggestions on a better mic? Hopefully something cheaper.......... :P
#8
Quote by Isakale
Good, thanks for the tips, guys! Any suggestions on a better mic? Hopefully something cheaper.......... :P

It's unlikely anything cheaper will be an improvement, the best thing you can do is read the Interfaces sticky.

Gibson LP Traditional, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm > TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#9
Recording takes practice you need to do it more and get comfortable with as many aspects of recording as you can.

Probably the easy way to treat your room is to get one that is quiet and mostly soft surfaces so that it has less effects on your recording.