#1
Hey guys,

as the title said,

i've got a problem with staying in tune only when i dive my Floyd (original Floyd rose) When i pull it, everything remains in tune.

So i decided to go to a local store to have it checked, when i took it back, it has the exact same problem.

Do you guys have an idea of what's going on?
#2
May be the springs not wanting to stretch while returning to normal, which in that case, you could possibly get looser, more responsive springs. Or it could be a poorly set-up Floyd.
Quote by pedromiles101
you're not gonna want to take a dump in a gross, off-colored, vintage toilet. you want something that is white and pearly; something that shines. something that you can put your cheeks against and say, "f*** yeah"
#3
Describe the problem a little more.

After you dive bomb, are all of the strings flat?
How old is the guitar? Has anyone checked the knife edges? Anyone looked in the spring cavity?

There really isn't anything complicated about the Floyd, despite its look. It's a teeter-totter. Spring tension vs. string tension with a fulcrum in between. I've always lubricated my knife edges, and it's a good idea to inspect them to make sure that they haven't become blunted, curled a bit, etc.

Make sure your strings aren't too old (and if you've just put them on, give them a little time to stretch).

Simply taking it to a store isn't the same as taking it to a good guitar tech. Where are you located? This bunch might be able to help you find a good one in your area.
#4
The guitar is six months old and all of the strings are flat when i dive.

Nobody checked the knife edges, maybe a factory problem? Not to mention that the guitar came with a wiring system not grounded.

New, used or old string did not change anything. I'm gonna record an album later this month with this guitar, maybe it's worth going to a guitar tech to set ip up correctly.
Last edited by phidias13 at Jul 1, 2014,
#5
What version of floyd is on it? Try pulling your springs and lifting the floyd out and put a touch of chapstick on the knife edges, or you can use a graphite lubricant, a pencil tip if your in a pinch, see if that works for ya.

Actually, instead of pulling the trem you could also try rotating the trem studs 1/2 a turn and lube the groove and turn back to where it was.
Last edited by Fastmerc at Jul 1, 2014,
#6
Quote by Fastmerc
What version of floyd is on it? Try pulling your springs and lifting the floyd out and put a touch of chapstick on the knife edges, or you can use a graphite lubricant, a pencil tip if your in a pinch, see if that works for ya.

Actually, instead of pulling the trem you could also try rotating the trem studs 1/2 a turn and lube the groove and turn back to where it was.


That's a really good way to ruin the knife edges...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#7
Quote by phidias13
The guitar is six months old and all of the strings are flat when i dive.

Nobody checked the knife edges, maybe a factory problem? Not to mention that the guitar came with a wiring system not grounded.

Check the knife edges, but that shouldn't be an issue if it's only 6 months old. And get the wiring system grounded ASAP; nothing is worse than a small jolt of electricity into your hand as you're playing riffs.

New, used or old string did not change anything. I'm gonna record an album later this month with this guitar, maybe it's worth going to a guitar tech to set ip up correctly.

I would say you need to do 2 things, in regards to setup. 1) Get a guitar tech to set it up properly. If he allows you to, watch him a bit. 2) Get on Youtube next time you change strings and learn how to set it up yourself. You'll probably have forgotten some of the stuff you may have learned by watching the tech previously, assuming he even let you watch him.
The thing is, without a proper setup, a Floyd -- regardless of brand or type -- is going to sound bad and/or causes problems (case in point, what happens now when you divebomb). Oh, and make sure you stretch new strings before you lock down the locking nut. Anyway, if you have a properly setup Floyd system, it should stay in tune, despite crazy divebombs or anything like that. Hell, I even do a trick where I divebomb until the tip of the whammy bar touches a sounding string, which creates a harmonic. My point is, it should stay in tune despite any whammy bar abuse.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 1, 2014,
#8
Yeah,

the wiring system is grounded now, no problem.

I know very well how to set up my floyd. But when it comes to the knives, i don't know much.

The only thing that surprise me is that everything is in tune when i pull it , and when dive it's not. So basically what's i'm doing to retune the guitar after a dive, is to pull it one more time. I don't know why one work and the other don't. I'll definitely bring it to a guitar tech.
#9
if it comes up from a dive flat, springs could be too loose, sharp, too tight


knives are super easy to clean,also do the posts...remove the bridge, likely some debris
Last edited by Tempoe at Jul 1, 2014,
#10
Quote by Arby911
That's a really good way to ruin the knife edges...

Only if its a cheap crap trem. If its a quality trem the knife edges are stronger than any other part on the thing.
#11
yeah, but you can have good edges and crappy posts (like some Jacksons)
#12
It's in one direction because you are tuning it up after a pull up. If you re-tuned it immediately after a dive bomb, and then did a dive bomb, I'll bet it would be in tune. But you would have to continue to dive bomb to stay in tune. There's no particular direction to the "stuck", it just can't swing freely to the rest position. So you must have some friction issues. As everybody has indicated, it's probably in the fulcrum.
Last edited by rigatele at Jul 2, 2014,
#13
Quote by Arby911
That's a really good way to ruin the knife edges...


I have several guitars with trem systems. Every single manual specifically describes how you adjust the action without removing the tension. If it was such a bullet proof way of ruining or causing damage to the knife edges, wouldn't that caution be included in the manual? Most companies go a long way to stop complaints, and I would have thought that Ibanez and others would have got tired of complaints from people who had ruined their trems by following the instrctions in the manual...
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#14
One last question: how many springs in your spring cavity and how are they arranged?

Open that back cavity and take a look -- if the springs seem a bit sloppy at the "rest" position, you may want to screw the claw into the guitar a bit to add some tension (and then you'll have to retune the guitar, of course, since it will now be sharp everywhere). You want to be sure that the springs are under enough tension to pull the Floyd back into position against the string tension. If they're not, your trem can easily go overall flat after a dive. And this will not affect the "pulls" because the string tension is responsible for pulling the Floyd back into position after one of those.
#15
I've got 3 springs in the back, one in the middle and 2 on the sides. Also i'm playing in Drop C tuning. I've read a while ago that when your tuning is getting lower you have to add a spring ( around drop B)
#16
Quote by phidias13
I've got 3 springs in the back, one in the middle and 2 on the sides. Also i'm playing in Drop C tuning. I've read a while ago that when your tuning is getting lower you have to add a spring ( around drop B)


How does the Floyd bridge look with relation to the top of the guitar? They are supposed to be parallel. If not, tighten or loosed the springs to make them parallel and recheck.
#17
As i said before the Floyd rose is well set up, it's parallel.
Last edited by phidias13 at Jul 3, 2014,