#1
Here's the thing:

I'm looking to add some tastefully done tapping arpeggios and legato licks to my compositions. Specifically something in the style of a toned down Invalids/Surface Area/ This Town Need Guns.

Of course to do this I need to hone my skills.

Now there's not at lot, if any, of this variety of mathy music tabbed just because it gets so complex. For that reason I'm having trouble figuring things out by ear, but I'd love to have this in my compositional tool box.

I was just wondering if anyone who's dabbled in this style could give me some quick pointers, or interesting licks to try, and help me nail down exactly what make this technique sound so different in practice to what you get from standard tapping lessons. I've made some good leaps recently, but I feel like I need more, you know?

EDIT: I know there are some fingerstyle acoustic guitarists out there who are good with this stuff. Recommendations?
#2
stay away from repeated tapping for one; dont just tap a minor triad three or four times


throw in the taps at the apex of sweeps or legato sections. theyll have to be after a hammer on or two to give your finger time to get to the fretboard

the rest is kind of dependent on what style of music youre playing

also dont be afraid to slide with the tapping finger
Quote by Rick540
I play in drop F. When I chug on the 6th string the floor splits open and satan crawls out.
Last edited by nightsycthe at Jul 1, 2014,
#3
Good stuff, nightsycthe!

Just had a thought: I get the feeling from listening to this stuff that there's an awful lot of fretting hand work that I'm missing when "holding down" chords.
#4
I'm interested in this too. I only know TTNG out of the bands you listed, and the guitarist often uses unconventional tunings, two capos (a normal one and a banjo one if I recall correctly) and just from what I can hear, has quite a "peculiar" fingerstyle technique, all on top of the tapping. Maybe start messing with your own head doing things like that? Instead of trying to think outside your usual stuff, force yourself to find new ways to play! I know I always end up going back to some pattern engraved in my fingers, so that's a way to avoid that. And remember, both hands have to tap.

Also, don't know many acoustic fingerstyle artists, but I'll give you some names: Michael Hedges (the one that influenced everybody in the genre), and the relatively well known: Andy Mckee and Jon Gomm. Also, on the electric guitar: Stanley Jordan has a impressive tapping technique, check him out!

And finally: don't know if this is the type of tapping you want, but these songs might interest you - Tapping Into My Dark Tranquility (Kiko Loureiro), Headless Horsemen, Midnight and A Day at the Beach (Joe Satriani).

Edit: And finally finally: http://youtu.be/UrDEmywnikU
Last edited by Lersch at Jul 1, 2014,
#5
Remember that tapping is just another technique to get from one note to the next, and treat it as such.

If you find that you're doing it to show off and that it doesn't help the song at all, or that it simply sounds better if you slide between the notes (for example) rather than tapping, don't tap.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
Quote by nightsycthe
stay away from repeated tapping for one; dont just tap a minor triad three or four times

I get what you're going for, but sometimes this is appropriate.
#7
Quote by AlanHB
Remember that tapping is just another technique to get from one note to the next, and treat it as such.

If you find that you're doing it to show off and that it doesn't help the song at all, or that it simply sounds better if you slide between the notes (for example) rather than tapping, don't tap.


I get what you mean, but I also think it depends so much on what genre of music you're using it in. Math rock? Almost standard. Pop punk? Non-existent.. for the most part. While I compose music on the more complex end of the spectrum I've never gone over board, because I want to actually play this stuff one day haha this is only a technique to add more of a unique flavour to my music really.

Anyway, thanks to everyone who's commented so far for your little hints and tricks. They're actually helping a lot more than you'd expect.
#8
Quote by Of_Wolves
While I compose music on the more complex end of the spectrum

Sorry, but I found that hilarious.
#9
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Sorry, but I found that hilarious.


Thanks?

Not to be a dick but, I think it's pretty obvious what I mean. I'm not a shredder, I can't and don't want to play pointlessly fast, and my fingers don't stretch as far as I'd like them to at the moment, so I compose music that is "progressive" but doesn't use awkward chords/progressions or insist upon being flashy for the sake of it.

I just prefer musicality and creativity. Whatever.

This is just a thread about me looking to expand my technique.
#10
Quote by Of_Wolves
I get what you mean, but I also think it depends so much on what genre of music you're using it in. Math rock? Almost standard. Pop punk? Non-existent.. for the most part. While I compose music on the more complex end of the spectrum I've never gone over board, because I want to actually play this stuff one day haha this is only a technique to add more of a unique flavour to my music really.


I don't agree with you about the genres, and I don't agree that doing something because everyone else does it makes you "unique".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Does "everyone else" do it? Because I'll be honest I don't care about anything like that, I just like the sound the technique allows. That's all. And let's be honest the more you can do with your instrument, the more variety you can put into your music.

I'm not going to get into genre definition with you.
Last edited by Of_Wolves at Jul 2, 2014,
#12
it isn't one. its a way for a guitarist to play something you write based on your sense of musicianship and good taste.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#13
Quote by Of_Wolves
Does "everyone else" do it? Because I'll be honest I don't care about anything like that, I just like the sound the technique allows. That's all. And let's be honest the more you can do with your instrument, the more variety you can put into your music.

I'm not going to get into genre definition with you.


No genre wars here - you're the one who said "everyone who plays X genre uses tapping".

I'm saying there's no need for you to feel pressured to use it if you play music in the genre.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Quote by AlanHB
No genre wars here - you're the one who said "everyone who plays X genre uses tapping".

I'm saying there's no need for you to feel pressured to use it if you play music in the genre.


No pressure. None at all. I just fancy tightening up my skill at it is all.

I started this thread because I have a genuine interest in the improving my skill in the technique in relation to composition. In other words, it's not so much the "how do I do this?" that's perfectly appropriate for the technique forum but the "how should I integrate it in a musical way" that I thought would fit best in this one. If I'm in the wrong place I happy to concede that one haha

I may not be super good at it yet, but I understand enough to be at the point where I just need to practice more. So that's not under question

You can say "it's a way for a guitarist to play x passage of music if s/he feels like it", but to be fair tapping and the techniques associated with the math rock genre do produce a certain sound that's way past any kind of "that's how they chose to play it because they couldn't otherwise".

Am I making sense? I get the feeling the words aren't quite matching up to what I'm trying to say here.

Tbh, I've gotten a lot of great ideas from this thread, so you've all helped me already... regardless of how you define xyz and what beliefs you think I need to consider No hard feelings guys!
Last edited by Of_Wolves at Jul 3, 2014,