#1
So typically when I'm designing a chord progression I plan out all the available chords

So if the song is in E major I have all the chords in the E major scale + all the chords in the E minor scale available to me in my chord progression

from there I just try out random combinations until it works... isn't there some sort of guideline as to how to create chord progression using the number system for example a 1- 4 -5 progression

rather just experimenting trying random numbers and seeing if it works...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCpi7jKoduY

I've just came across this video and it has made me aware that there are rules you must follow when creating a chord progression

I'm sure most of you will say just go with ear and make it sound good...that's fine, but I'm not at that stage yet, I want some guidelines to play around with at the moment
#2
Quote by snakeybizz

So if the song is in E major I have all the chords in the E major scale + all the chords in the E minor scale available to me in my chord progression...[ ]..

In the text book sense this is completely false.

E Major scale: E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E (C#m is the relative minor to E major)

C# minor gives you all the chords of E major.

E Minor scale: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D, E (G major is the relative major to E minor)

G major gives you all the chords in E minor.

I'm not saying you can't play pentatonic minor scales over major chords, and I'm not saying you can't "borrow chords from parallel keys.

But technically, you have NO chords available from E minor, if you're sticking strictly to the E major scale. You can obviously play whatever note, chord, or dyad that moves you, but the chords in E minor have nothing to do with the chords in E major.

Playing using the E harmonic minor scale, B major often replaces B minor, (v to V), and yields a major 7th interval back to the tonic, (Em (i)), instead of the b7th, (Bm), in the natural minor scale.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 3, 2014,
#3
Quote by Captaincranky
In the text book sense this is completely false.

E Major scale: E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E (C#m is the relative minor to E major)

C# minor gives you all the chords of E major.

E Minor scale: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D, E (G major is the relative major to E minor)

G major gives you all the chords in E minor.

I'm not saying you can't play pentatonic minor scales over major chords, and I'm not saying you can't "borrow chords from parallel keys.

But technically, you have NO chords available from E minor, if you're sticking strictly to the E major scale. You can obviously play whatever note, chord, or dyad that moves you, but the chords in E minor have nothing to do with the chords in E major.

Playing using the E harmonic minor scale, B major often replaces B minor, (v to V), and yields a major 7th interval back to the tonic, (Em (i)), instead of the b7th, (Bm), in the natural minor scale.


You can use chords of the minor key too...confused the hell out of when analysing nirvanas chord progressions because it does this all the time

for example rape me goes A, C, E, G

that is chords from A major and the A minor key
#4
Quote by snakeybizz
You can use chords of the minor key too...confused the hell out of when analysing nirvanas chord progressions because it does this all the time

for example rape me goes A, C, E, G

that is chords from A major and the A minor key
Honest, I don't care what Nirvana does. I said you can play whatever chords suit your fancy. The textbook says both you the band, are wrong, relating back to basic music theory. You can do anything you want, and imagine a theoretical exception for it as well.


None of the chords of E minor, exist natively in E major. OTOH, use whatever chords you like without restriction. Lots of artists make major/minor exchanges. Playing a major chord in place of a minor, or vice-verso. It's called "borrowing from the parallel minor, or major".

If you want to maintain the integrity of the E major scale, you can't use the chords from E minor.

If you want to make sweeping statements, "you can use all the chords in any key, in any other key". Why limit yourself to this E major to E minor exchange?

But here again, they won't be native to the key. Does that matter, probably not. All my post was intended to do, is ask you to not rewrite the book, before reading it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 3, 2014,
#5
That's how you can tell a great jazz player. They can find an appropriate place for all 12 notes in a song and it sounds like they meant to do that.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
That's how you can tell a great jazz player. They can find an appropriate place for all 12 notes in a song and it sounds like they meant to do that.
Yeah, either that or play all the notes of any given scale together, and worry about naming the chord later.....

Completely divergent musings/rantings on my part to follow. Read at your own risk:

Mercifully I was never privileged to hear Sun Ra. Someone told me he was, "completely inaccessible jazz".

He sold quite a few albums though. I guess he managed to convince a few people it was music.....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 3, 2014,
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
Honest, I don't care what Nirvana does. I said you can play whatever chords suit your fancy. The textbook says both you the band, are wrong, relating back to basic music theory. You can do anything you want, and imagine a theoretical exception for it as well.


None of the chords of E minor, exist natively in E major. OTOH, use whatever chords you like without restriction. Lots of artists make major/minor exchanges. Playing a major chord in place of a minor, or vice-verso. It's called "borrowing from the parallel minor, or major".

If you want to maintain the integrity of the E major scale, you can't use the chords from E minor.

If you want to make sweeping statements, "you can use all the chords in any key, in any other key". Why limit yourself to this E major to E minor exchange?

But here again, they won't be native to the key. Does that matter, probably not. All my post was intended to do, is ask you to not rewrite the book, before reading it.


I have no interest in maintaining the integrity of the E major scale, at no point did I say that was the idea... I want to create a chord progression that sounds good... I do that using chords of a key and sometimes implement chords from the parallel key

I make random combinations until something sounds good, but I don't want to make random combinations I want to make intelligent decision on what chord to "pick" next

for example one 100% method to making a progression work is to do a Diatonic Circle Progression where you just go up the scale for example A minor, D minor, G, C...in the key of C

that is the kind of example I am looking for... a set in stone rule to create a chord progression
#8
Quote by snakeybizz
...[ ].....that is the kind of example I am looking for... a set in stone rule to create a chord progression
There is no "set in stone rule to create a chord progression". At least AFAIK.

There are common progressions. People make hits from them, and most of the time using the chords in G, C, D, or A, along with a capo.

Your example of the all major chord Nirvana progression, isn't in any way unique to that band.

In fact, "See Me, Feel Me" from "Tommy", uses those 4 chords, (and a few more).

(A)"Listening to you, I hear music, (C), (A) gazing at you, I get the heat (E) (A) Following you, I'd climb the mountain (C) I get (G) excitement (D) at your (Bsus4(!)) feet.

To write a, "surefire chord progression", sounds like, "how do I write a surefire hit"

Dude, I wish I could tell you. But, to write one, you need to convince as many people as possible, (besides yourself), that it indeed is music, and it's music they like. Sadly, easier said than done.


I'm a simple man. Music that resonates most strongly with me, is in its lyrics first. I worry about what chords they're playing much later. (Although you can almost always hear when they're blasting away on D major open).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 3, 2014,