#1
A friend and I have been writing a few songs together just for fun. I've been in a few bands before and know the delicate balance that needs to be kept.

I am the guitarist and he is the singer. I have a decent set up for recording. We have been jamming at his place because we can make noise there. It has been a lot of fun and nice to just do some jamming again but he wants to get a full band going and take it seriously again. We already had one practice with the "new members"

Thing is, I write the songs and he does the vocals and he does help to push the song in the right direction. I write the drums in midi and everything else. I know I do most of the work but it's ok, I enjoy it.

If we get more members in I'm worried that A) the drummer (and other guitarist and bassist) is going to want to change everything (I would encourage the guitarist and bassist to come up with their own stuff for the most part but if the drummer starts changing stuff it will mess up the song, it already has with the one I showed him) and B) they are going to want to tour and play shows almost straight away.

I have a problems with this because A) they want to change most of the stuff and make it "their own" and B) I am the only one with a car so guess who is going to do all the driving for gigs.

I would really like to keep jamming and writing songs with the vocalist because he is good and brings my songs to life, I am trying to convince him to focus more on recording and maybe an internet project but he is convinced that we need a band and a stage presence and to hit the road but honestly the music scene sucks here and touring is just going to cost money.

I want to hear what you guys think. I don't want to be an ass because these other members are good friends of the vocals and kinda my friends also, (I know them from a few years back). I just don't want this fun thing that I am already putting a lot of time into to become work that doesn't even sound how I envisioned anymore.

I feel like i want a group of session musicians who arnt gonna butcher everything and I also feel like trying to make a good recording and spreading it online is a better route to take.

Thoughts, opinions, am I being an ass?
Last edited by Victorgeiger at Jul 4, 2014,
#2
No, but you are in ass territory, be careful how you say things, but i'd look for a compromise. Put some stuff out, play a few shows, put some stuff out, play a few shows

i.e BE the reason your local music scene becomes good.
"Everyone should embrace their inner old-man."

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Pissing off people since 2012
#3
4 words: Walk Off The Earth

they went from 2 to 5 with no problems at all.

if you prefer just the two of you then there's no reason why you shouldn't... loads of great bands have only 2 people... white stripes, tenacious D, simon and garfunkel, Daft Punk...
Belief is a beautiful armour but makes for the heaviest sword.
#4
I think the drummer should listen to your original drum ideas. Of course he doesn't need to play them note for note. But the overall groove should be similar. Of course if the stuff he comes up with sounds better than the original groove, that's great. But if he just wants to play his own stuff for the sake of playing his own stuff, that's not good. When I write songs, I don't only write my own parts. I try to write all parts. I of course let people tweak them. But the original idea needs to stay the same. Tell your bandmates what you are after. And tell them that they can tweak them, as long as the original idea stays the same. In a band you can't play whatever you want to play. You need to listen to the other members and play something that fits their parts.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#5
What type of music are you playing man? I mean maybe I'm just lucky but nearly everything I write can be broken down onto paper as a the lyrics, changes, maybe a little tab for a riff or riffs, and then general tempo and rhythm guidelines. 99% of rock/folk/pop/reggae/blues/jazz songs can be broken up that way.

The rest should be interpreted by the band. Every group has it's own groove and if you don't like the groove you're in, than you shouldn't be a part of that groove.

I'm sorta in the same position as you: I've been writing with a singer for the past month and we've put together quite a number of demos and we're looking to expand.

The thing is that we're not trying to make every song exactly the way we wrote it. Music evolves. Even your own songs will. Some of my older songs have gone through 5+ iterations/overhauls. It happens. I mean, it's one thing to have a vision of where you want to go, it's quite another to be a musical tyrant

If you're not "feeling it" with this drummer, than maybe you need to find a new one if you guys want to actually get serious. I mean it sounds to me that if you guys can't find a groove that's close to how the song was intended to be played, than you're playing with bad musicians or playing with musicians who don't want to play the type of music you're going for. Neither is a group of musicians that you should be associating yourself with.

The drummer should be able to give you something relatively close to what you need. It's your job to make a few adjustments here and there if need be or to say "Hey dude, I need to play this. This is the idea I came up with before. How do we make it work?"
#6
Thanks for all the input and advice guys, I had a good think about it and I decided to invite the drummer over to my place, just me and him and we sat and worked on the midi together. He just left so I thought I would just post to let you all know that I think it's all going to work out.

Seams like we just needed some time to get our visions lined up, he made the midi sound much more realistic like how a drummer would really play and now he has the files to practice to at home.

So we will see how it goes but I'm excited about it, we also agreed to take it easy on the gigging and lay down some tracks first. Amped \m/
#7
Quote by Victorgeiger
Thanks for all the input and advice guys, I had a good think about it and I decided to invite the drummer over to my place, just me and him and we sat and worked on the midi together. He just left so I thought I would just post to let you all know that I think it's all going to work out.

Seams like we just needed some time to get our visions lined up, he made the midi sound much more realistic like how a drummer would really play and now he has the files to practice to at home.

So we will see how it goes but I'm excited about it, we also agreed to take it easy on the gigging and lay down some tracks first. Amped \m/

Of course he will make it more real sounding. I don't think he should play it note for note the way you wrote it, as long as the groove stays pretty much the same - and if he has improvement ideas, of course listen to him. He's the drummer and knows what he's doing. But if you don't like it, tell him that it isn't what you are after.

Yeah, it's good to talk about your parts and make them fit each other.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Don't worry about things that haven't happened yet.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#9
There are 2 types of bands:
1) Backing bands - the players are 'for hire' and play what the 'leader(s)' of the band dictate. Some freedom of expression is fine, but again, per the leader's input.
2) Democratic bands - all players get equal input on decisions. Some democratic bands still have a leader who can make the final 'yay or nay' call.

What type of band you have and how it is going to be run needs to be decided at the very start so there are no questions when things need to be decided on.
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