#1
I'm looking for a Gibson Les Paul with the thicker 1950's neck. I prefer the 498 pickups. Finding one of these in a guitar shop is pretty much a crapshoot. There are plenty online. Is there a big difference in the feel on Gibsons or if I like a certain model in a store would it pretty much play/feel like one I got online?
#2
Just order it from someone who makes it easy to exchange it if you get a botched guitar.
#3
If i where you i would visit a shop and try out a lot of les pauls. I love les pauls, but some can be dark, some can be bright. Go check some out and pick one.
#4
Buying in person is always better, but if it isn't possible, shop with reputable dealers with good return policies. So far, most of my purchases have been sight unseen, and I've had almost no issues. The two problems I had were quickly rectified.

How expensive a guitar are we talking about?
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#5
The Gibson necks are a lot more uniform than they used to be. Most of the shaping is done by machine these days, then they rub it down with sandpaper and call it "hand-carved". If you can find ten Les Pauls offering the 50's profile that you prefer, the differences between the necks will be nearly indistinguishable. The sound is a different story.
#6
Quote by scorpio2billion
Most of the shaping is done by machine these days, then they rub it down with sandpaper and call it "hand-carved".


Said sandpaper is a an electric roller that can strip away a lot of wood. Gibson seems to employ these machines rather liberally, thus the reputation for producing necks of inconsistent thickness.
#7
Yes, a belt sander. But they're for finish work, not shaping. The shaping is done en masse by machine. They use steel contour gauges to check for uniformity, too, so they're pretty consistent. Unlike 10 or 15 years ago, when all shaping was done with a bandsaw and files by a guy at a bench.
#8
neck profile consistency aside, there's still a very good chance that you can end up with a perfectly good les paul that you just don't like very much.

For some reason Gibsons all just feel completely individual and unlike any other Gibson guitar, in my experience, regardless of how technically identical they may be. Some just feel right, and others just don't, and you can't necessarily point to any specific reason why you'd love one and hate another.

It's always a bit of a gamble when you're buying a guitar online whatever you buy, and when you're spending that much on a guitar, I wouldn't recommend it.
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#9
Quote by Blompcube
neck profile consistency aside, there's still a very good chance that you can end up with a perfectly good les paul that you just don't like very much.

For some reason Gibsons all just feel completely individual and unlike any other Gibson guitar, in my experience, regardless of how technically identical they may be. Some just feel right, and others just don't, and you can't necessarily point to any specific reason why you'd love one and hate another.

It's always a bit of a gamble when you're buying a guitar online whatever you buy, and when you're spending that much on a guitar, I wouldn't recommend it.

Agreed.

I spent months shopping for a Les Paul to be my main guitar, I tried dozens in numerous shops, some were good, some were great, some were meh, some were terrible. That included Juniors, Studios, Standards and Customs.

Eventually I found that one guitar with the 'It' Factor that made me fall in love with it, and I spent about a 1/4 of my budget on a Faded Satin Studio.
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#10
Gibson LP's are in almost every single guitar store available. Since the option to try before you buy is there, do take complete advantage of it.
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#12
Well I went to the store today and spent $2300 (after tax) on a 2014 Honeyburst Gibson Les Paul Traditional with a fat neck and 1959 pickups. I probably could have bought a new (or even used) online for cheaper but didn't want to take any risks of 1) counterfeits and 2) sitting in a UPS truck in 115 degree Phoenix heat, etc. for a guitar I haven't seen. It plays great and sounds a lot better than my Mexican Strat. Although this doesn't exactly help my retirement plans, this is a really nice guitar and I don't have buyers remorse.
#13
Happy NGD! Can't wait to see the pics.
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#15
sweet
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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